ChemPlusChem

Cover image for Vol. 77 Issue 11

November 2012

Volume 77, Issue 11

Pages 959–1050

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Lithium Subhydrides under Pressure and Their Superatom-like Building Blocks (ChemPlusChem 11/2012) (page 959)

      James Hooper and Eva Zurek

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201290047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows that at pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell LiH may react with elemental Li to yield the lithium subhydride, Li5H. In their Communication on page 969 ff., J. Hooper and E. Zurek use an evolutionary algorithm coupled with first-principles calculations to predict a new class of compounds in the lithium-rich region of the lithium/hydrogen phase diagram under pressure. The building block of all of the LimH, 5<m<9, structures predicted in this study is an Li8H cluster, which can be thought of as a superalkali atom. Detailed theoretical calculations show that the geometries and electronic structures of the subhydrides are analogous to that of the well-known alkali metal suboxides. Pictures created using Endeavour 1.7, Crystal Impact, Bonn, Germany (2012); http://www.crystalimpact.com/endeavour, E-mail: info@crystalimpact.com.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemPlusChem 11/2012 (page 960)

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201290048

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPlusChem 11/2012 (pages 961–965)

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201290049

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Lithium Subhydrides under Pressure and Their Superatom-like Building Blocks (pages 969–972)

      James Hooper and Eva Zurek

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200130

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Feeling the pressure: First principles calculations exploring the lithium-rich region of the lithium/hydrogen phase diagram show that the extended systems LimH (m=4–9) become stable at approximately 50 GPa. These lithium subhydrides are constructed from superalkali Li8H clusters, and are both structurally and electronically similar to the well-known alkali metal suboxides.

    2. Construction of Rechargeable Batteries Using Multifused Tetrathiafulvalene Systems as Cathode Materials (pages 973–976)

      Yuu Inatomi, Nobuhiko Hojo, Taisuke Yamamoto, Sho-ichiro Watanabe and Prof. Dr. Yohji Misaki

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200197

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rechargeable batteries using bis- or tris-fused tetrathiafulvalenes as an active electrode material exhibit good cycle performance by controlling the number of electrons participating in the redox reaction. The TTPY cell using a four-electron redox process shows a discharge capacity of 168 mAh g−1 and good cycle-life stability of 84 % of the initial capacity after 100 cycles (see charge-discharge curves).

    3. Manganese Salen Compounds Embedded within Cross-Linked Chiral Polyethylenimine: Asymmetric Epoxidation in an Aqueous Biphasic Medium (pages 977–981)

      Dr. Noam Levi and Prof. Ronny Neumann

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chiral cross-linked polyethylenimines were used to intercalate MnIII salen catalysts, thereby inducing a chiral environment upon an achiral metal complex. The synzyme, dispersed in water, catalyzes the aqueous biphasic asymmetric epoxidation of styrene derivatives (see structure; L=Cl, OAc, R=isopropyl, phenyl). In the presence of the chiral catalyst there is a significant synergistic effect that increases the enantioselectivity of epoxidation.

    4. Trypsin-Immobilized Metal–Organic Framework as a Biocatalyst In Proteomics Analysis (pages 982–986)

      Yung-Han Shih, Sheng-Han Lo, Ni-Shin Yang, Brenda Singco, Yi-Jie Cheng, Cheng-You Wu, I-Hsin Chang, Prof. Hsi-Ya Huang and Prof. Chia-Her Lin

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200186

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enzyme immobilization: The protease enzyme was successfully immobilized onto dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC)-activated metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). After separation by nano-LC-MS2 (liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry), detection, and database searching the protein digestion efficiency of trypsin-MOF was comparable to traditional in-solution digestion (see figure). Furthermore, the trypsin-MOF was reusable.

    5. Water Detoxification by a Substrate-Bound Catecholamine Adsorbent (pages 987–990)

      Mihyun Lee, Junsung Rho, Dr. Dong-Eun Lee, Seonki Hong, Sun-Ju Choi, Prof. Phillip B. Messersmith and Prof. Haeshin Lee

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bio-inspired approach for detoxification of water has been investigated. In this approach, three major classes of toxic agents, heavy-metal ions (Cr, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Cd), toxic organic species (4-aminopyridine), and a radioisotope (Lutetium-177) were effectively removed from contaminated water by polydopamine, a mussel-inspired adhesive catecholamine (see figure). In addition, this polydopamine filter was easily regenerated by treatment with acid or hydrogen peroxide.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Hydrogenated TiO2 Nanotube Arrays as High-Rate Anodes for Lithium-Ion Microbatteries (pages 991–1000)

      Dr. Zhouguang Lu, Dr. Cho-Tong Yip, Dr. Liping Wang, Prof. Haitao Huang and Prof. Limin Zhou

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200104

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Battery powered: Annealing under a reducing atmosphere (5 % H2 and 95 % Ar) has considerably improved the high-rate capability of TiO2 nanotube arrays, which have been applied as anodes for lithium-ion microbatteries. This improvement is attributed to the increased bulk electronic conductivity, making the TiO2 nanotubes favor a bulk n-type conductor (see figure).

    2. Synthesis, Physicochemical Studies, Molecular Dynamics Simulations, and Metal-Ion-Dependent Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Properties of Cone ICL670-Substituted Calix[4]arenes (pages 1001–1016)

      Dr. Pascal Rouge, Dr. Alexandra Dassonville-Klimpt, Dr. Christine Cézard, Dr. Stéphanie Boudesocque, Dr. Roger Ourouda, Dr. Carole Amant, Dr. François Gaboriau, Dr. Isabelle Forfar, Prof. Dr. Jean Guillon, Prof. Dr. Emmanuel Guillon, Dr. Enguerran Vanquelef, Dr. Piotr Cieplak, Prof. Dr. François-Yves Dupradeau, Prof. Dr. Laurent Dupont and Prof. Dr. Pascal Sonnet

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let′s stick together: A series of calix[4]arenes substituted at the lower rim with ICL670, a strong FeIII chelator (see figure), has been synthesized. This grafting improved the iron-chelating and lipophilicity properties of the calixarenes and their antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties were investigated.

    3. Controlled Synthesis of Anatase TiO2 Single Crystals with Dominant {001} Facets from TiO2 Powders (pages 1017–1021)

      Hongmei Li, Prof. Yangsu Zeng, Prof. Tongcheng Huang, Prof. Lingyu Piao and Dr. Min Liu

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Easy does it: Anatase TiO2 single crystals with dominant {001} facets have been fabricated in a controlled manner from TiO2 powders through a facile route (see figure). The obtained crystals show a superior photoreactivity to that of P25 TiO2 powders, thus opening a new avenue to the preparation of highly active TiO2 single crystals with {001} facets from low-cost TiO2 powders.

    4. Highly Asymmetric Tribenzonaphtho-Condensed Porphyrazinatozinc Complex: An Efficient Near-Infrared Sensitizer for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1022–1027)

      Lijuan Yu, Xiaole Zhou, Yinghui Yin, Dr. Yuwen Liu, Dr. Renjie Li and Prof. Tianyou Peng

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) derivatives containing tribenzonaphtho-condensed porphyrazine (see figure) are reported. As a dye for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the highly asymmetric derivative containing tBu groups yields a 3.56 % efficiency with the highest IPCE of 60.7 % in the red/near-IR region, which is higher than that of the derivative containing nBuO groups (2.20 % with an IPCE of 22.9 %) under AM 1.5G solar irradiation.

    5. Easy Derivatisation of Group 10 N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes and In Vitro Evaluation of an Anticancer Oestradiol Conjugate (pages 1028–1038)

      Dr. Edith Chardon, Dr. Gian Luigi Puleo, Georges Dahm, Prof. Sylvie Fournel, Dr. Gilles Guichard and Dr. Stéphane Bellemin-Laponnaz

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Right on target! Ruthenium-catalysed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition has been used to functionalise a series of Pd and Pt N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes (see scheme). This strategy was applied to the conjugation of amino acid, polyethylene glycol and oestradiol derivatives. These results bode well for the development of Pt–NHC complexes functionalised with cell-targeting elements.

    6. Organic Ionic Plastic Crystals and Low Viscosity Ionic Liquids Based on the Dicyano(nitroso)methanide Anion (pages 1039–1045)

      Dr. Judith Janikowski, Mohd R. Razali, Prof. Stuart R. Batten, Prof. Douglas R. MacFarlane and Dr. Jennifer M. Pringle

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plastic crystals: The dicyano(nitroso)methanide anion has been used to produce a new series of ionic liquids with low viscosities and good ionic conductivities, in addition to new organic ionic plastic crystals with desirable phase behaviour (see structure; O red, N blue; C green).

    7. Oxyhumolite as a Sorbent of CuII from Phosphate-Containing Solutions (pages 1046–1050)

      Hana Kohutová, Dr. Bruno Kostura and Dr. Jana Kukutschová

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adsorption studies: The most efficient and relatively accessible sorbents of metals seem to be oxyhumolites. Their good sorption efficiency for metals (CuII) is caused by a high content of humic acids and strongly depends on pH. The sorption of phosphate anions on oxyhumolite was found to be constant and independent of the pH value (see plot).

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION