ChemPlusChem

Cover image for Vol. 78 Issue 11

November 2013

Volume 78, Issue 11

Pages 1313–1420, beide–0

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Fabrication of Metal-Nanoparticle-Modified Semiconducting Copper– and Silver–TCNQ Materials as Substrates for the Reduction of Chromium(VI) Using Thiosulfate Ions at Ambient Temperature (ChemPlusChem 11/2013) (page 1313)

      Dr. Andrew Pearson and Dr. Anthony P. O'Mullane

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300367

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      The cover picture shows a SEM image of a semiconducting CuTCNQ microrod whose surface is decorated with metal nanoparticles by a simple galvanic replacement process. A. O'Mullane and A. Pearson report on the use of this composite material as a catalyst for reducing CrVI ions to a less hazardous CrIII state using thiosulfate ions at ambient temperature in their Full Paper on page 1343. The nature of the semiconducting substrate and metal nanoparticle combination is hypothesized to be highly influential on the reaction rate with the CuTCNQ/Pt composite demonstrating the best results.

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Fabrication of Metal-Nanoparticle-Modified Semiconducting Copper– and Silver–TCNQ Materials as Substrates for the Reduction of Chromium(VI) Using Thiosulfate Ions at Ambient Temperature (page 1314)

      Dr. Andrew Pearson and Dr. Anthony P. O'Mullane

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300329

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      The fabrication of new materials with increasing functionality is an extremely fast moving field with a myriad of new formulations and applications which make the materials science area so fascinating.” This and more about the story behind the cover in the Cover Profile can be found on page 1314 and about the research itself on page 1343.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPlusChem 11/2013 (pages 1315–1321)

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201390042

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
  5. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemPlusChem 11/2013 (page 1326)

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201390044

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Facile Structural Elucidation of Glycans Using NMR Spectroscopy Data and the Program CASPER: Application to the O-Antigen Polysaccharide of Escherichia coli O155 (pages 1327–1329)

      Carolina Fontana, Prof. Andrej Weintraub and Prof. Göran Widmalm

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300273

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      Time saver: The program CASPER was successfully employed to rapidly elucidate a new O-antigen polysaccharide structure (obtained from a strain of Escherichia coli serogroup O155), using solely unassigned NMR spectroscopy data as input information. Thus, what is considered the most tedious and time-consuming part of the structural elucidation process has been reduced from several hours (or even days) of manual interpretation to about four minutes of automated analysis.

    2. Windowsill Hydrogen Production under Daylight Irradiation (pages 1330–1333)

      Dr. Bertrand Vileno, Prof. Philippe Turek, Dr. Jean Weiss and Dr. David Martel

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300201

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      Here comes the sun! Hydrogen can be produced on a windowsill under daylight irradiation of TiO2-supported platinum by using a self-buffered electron-donor solution that optimizes the interfacial processes (see figure).

    3. Efficient Terpene Synthase Catalysis by Extraction in Flow (pages 1334–1337)

      Oscar Cascón, Prof. Dr. Gerald Richter, Prof. Dr. Rudolf K. Allemann and Prof. Dr. Thomas Wirth

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300303

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      Flowing enzymes: Continuous extraction of products enhances the enzymatic productivity of sesquiterpenes (see figure). Even unnatural substrates are tolerated leading to valuable unnatural target molecules in superior yields compared with batch protocols.

    4. Ricinoleic Acid-Capped Upconverting Nanocrystals: An Ideal Capping Ligand to Render Nanocrystals Water Dispersible (pages 1338–1342)

      Brahmaiah Meesaragandla, Shyam Sarkar, Chanchal Hazra and Dr. Venkataramanan Mahalingam

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300205

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      Cap in hand: Ricinoleic acid (RA) replaces oleic acid as capping ligand in the synthesis of upconverting nanocrystals in the size range of 10 nm. The presence of hydroxyl groups near the double bond in RA is advantageous in hydroxylation of the bond (see figure), and the size of the nanocrystals is preserved. The small size, high water dispersibility, and strong upconversion from the nanocrystals could be utilized in sensing and bioimaging applications.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Masthead
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Fabrication of Metal-Nanoparticle-Modified Semiconducting Copper– and Silver–TCNQ Materials as Substrates for the Reduction of Chromium(VI) Using Thiosulfate Ions at Ambient Temperature (pages 1343–1348)

      Dr. Andrew Pearson and Dr. Anthony P. O'Mullane

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300293

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      In reduced circumstances: Readily recoverable and reusable organic semiconducting Cu- and AgTCNQ (TCNQ=7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) microstructures decorated with Pt and Pd nanoparticles have been applied to the removal of CrVI ions from aqueous solutions at room temperature using thiosulfate as reductant (see figure). The semiconductor–metal nanoparticle combination is critical to the catalyst performance: the best-performing material is CuTCNQ/Pt.

    2. Real-Time Monitoring of the Dephosphorylating Activity of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Using Microarrays with 3-Nitrophosphotyrosine Substrates (pages 1349–1357)

      Dr. Jeroen van Ameijde, Dr. John Overvoorde, Prof. Dr. Stefan Knapp, Prof. Dr. Jeroen den Hertog, Dr. Rob Ruijtenbeek and Prof. Dr. Rob M. J. Liskamp

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300299

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      Keeping it real: The activity of important protein tyrosine phosphatases has been monitored in real time in parallel with a novel substrate microarray through formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (see figure).

    3. Recover, Recycle, and Reuse: Prove-Out of Pyrotechnic Illuminants Containing Demilitarized Magnesium (pages 1358–1362)

      Dr. Jesse J. Sabatini, Dr. Jared D. Moretti, Derrick R. Hall and Prof. Dr. Leon L. Robert Jr.

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300231

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      Reuse old news: Pyrotechnic illuminants containing recycled magnesium recovered from demilitarization of obsolete military pyrotechnic illuminators have been successfully proven-out for military signaling (see picture), and are found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli. The “green” technology of using recycled materials in illuminating pyrotechnics serves to benefit both the military and civilian fireworks communities.

    4. Synthesis and Structure of Organobismuth Chlorides and Triflates Containing (C,E)-Chelating Ligands (E=O, S) and Their Catalytic Application in the Allylation of Aldehydes with Tetraallyltin (pages 1363–1369)

      Dr. Nianyuan Tan, Dr. Yi Chen, Dr. Yongbo Zhou, Prof. Dr. Chak-Tong Au and Prof. Dr. Shuang-Feng Yin

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300288

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      Hyped up: Four air-stable hypervalent organobismuth compounds with (C,O)- or (C,S)-chelating ligands, R2BiCl (R=2-(MeECH2)C6H4; E=O, S), [2-(MeOCH2)C6H4]2BiOSO2CF3 (see picture) and [{2-(MeSCH2)C6H4}2Bi][OSO2CF3], have successfully been synthesized and characterized. The pictured compound shows excellent catalytic activity and reusability for the allylation of aldehydes with tetraallyltin.

    5. Selective Hydrogenation of Phenol and Derivatives over Polymer-Functionalized Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Palladium Using Sodium Formate as the Hydrogen Source (pages 1370–1378)

      Prof. Dr. Aibing Chen, Yonglei Li, Prof. Dr. Jinzhu Chen, Guoying Zhao, Prof. Dr. Longlong Ma and Prof. Dr. Yifeng Yu

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300238

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      Source material: Palladium supported on nitrogen-containing-polymer-functionalized carbon nanofibers was used as the catalyst for selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone using sodium formate as the hydrogen source in aqueous media (see figure). The hydrogenation involved a hydrogen-transfer reaction pathway with cyclohexanone as the “intermediate”.

    6. Syntheses of LiCoO2 Mesocrystals by Topotactic Transformation and Their Electrochemical Properties (pages 1379–1383)

      Keisuke Nakajima, Prof. Yuya Oaki and Prof. Hiroaki Imai

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300213

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      Morph into one: New synthetic routes to LiCoO2 mesocrystals with a porous and single-crystalline structure are developed by using topotactic transformation of precursor crystals (see picture). Octahedral LiCoO2 frameworks and hollow LiCoO2 plates, consisting of oriented subunits, exhibit enhanced charge–discharge cycle stability and rate performance as the cathode material of lithium-ion batteries.

    7. Mixed Co–Mn Oxide-Catalysed Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Vanillyl Alcohol to Vanillin in Base-Free Conditions (pages 1384–1392)

      Ajay Jha, Dr. Kashinath R. Patil and Dr. Chandrashekhar V. Rode

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300247

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      It takes two: Mn in the MnCo mixed oxide (MO) forms a metal hydroperoxo complex simultaneously giving the phenolate ion of vanillyl alcohol under base-free conditions, which undergoes smooth air oxidation to give vanillin with >83 % selectivity (see scheme). The high catalytic activity of the MnCo-MO results from a synergic effect of the MO phases, which is absent in single Mn or Co oxides.

    8. Highly Efficient Povidone–Phosphotungstic Acid Catalyst for the Tandem Acetalization of Aldehydes to Bis- and Tris(indolyl)methanes (pages 1393–1399)

      Sumit B. Kamble, Rameshwar K. Swami, Sachin S. Sakate and Dr. Chandrashekhar V. Rode

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300248

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      One after the other: A hybrid of heteropoly acid and polyvinylpyrrolidone (povidone) catalyzes the acetalization of aldehydes in methanol at room temperature followed by reaction with indole to give bis- and tris(indolyl)methanes. The reaction proceeds through the acetal as an intermediate and not through the azafulvene (see scheme). The catalyst can be recycled efficiently.

    9. Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and SnO2/SiO2 Hybrid Materials by Twin Polymerization Using Tin(IV) Alkoxides (pages 1400–1412)

      Christian Leonhardt, Susann Brumm, Dr. Andreas Seifert, Dr. Gerhard Cox, Dr. Arno Lange, Dr. Tobias Rüffer, Dieter Schaarschmidt, Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang, Nathanael Jöhrmann, Michael Hietschold, Dr. Frank Simon and Prof. Dr. Michael Mehring

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200242

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      Double act: Well-defined tin alkoxide precursors have been prepared for application in the twin polymerization process, which provides composite materials composed of SnO2 nanoparticles entrapped in a polymer matrix (see scheme). Subsequent oxidation of the composite materials gives high-surface-area tin oxide and composites composed of SnO2/SiO2.

    10. Exploring Pathways for Activation of Carbon Monoxide by Palladium Iminophosphines (pages 1413–1420)

      Dr. Navaratnarajah Kuganathan, Edward Veal, Prof. Malcolm L. H. Green, Prof. Jennifer C. Green and Dr. Sofia I. Pascu

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300214

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      A competitive advantage: DFT calculations on methyl-substituted palladium(II) complexes incorporating P/N ligands demonstrate that CO activation in the presence of competing ligands, such as CH3CN or C2H4, occurs through an associative mechanism involving CO/ligand exchange, followed by migratory insertion of CO into the Pd[BOND]Me bond.

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