ChemPlusChem

Cover image for Vol. 78 Issue 3

March 2013

Volume 78, Issue 3

Pages 201–278

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Preparation of Fluorescent Tubulin Binders (ChemPlusChem 3/2013) (page 201)

      Dr. Elena Riva, Dr. Martin Mattarella, Dr. Stella Borrelli, Dr. Michael S. Christodoulou, Dr. Daniele Cartelli, Dr. Marcus Main, Dr. Stephen Faulkner, Dr. Daniel Sykes, Prof. Dr. Graziella Cappelletti, Prof. Dr. John S. Snaith and Prof. Dr. Daniele Passarella

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201390010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a lighthouse spreading its light on a stormy sea; this could be compared to the complexity of the biological role of tubulins and their involvement in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Just like a lighthouse, the microtubule structure could cast new light on live cell imaging studies if it incorporates fluorescent tubulin units. The compounds obtained by conjugation of tubulin binders with fluorescent probe molecules act as a bulb that can secure a direct assay to evidence the tubulin/microtubules network and offer a solution to overcome the invasive techniques of transfection or microinjection but also time-consuming immunofluorescence staining. A full account can be found in the Full Paper by D. Passarella and co-workers on page 222 ff.

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preparation of Fluorescent Tubulin Binders (page 202)

      Dr. Elena Riva, Dr. Martin Mattarella, Dr. Stella Borrelli, Dr. Michael S. Christodoulou, Dr. Daniele Cartelli, Dr. Marcus Main, Dr. Stephen Faulkner, Dr. Daniel Sykes, Prof. Dr. Graziella Cappelletti, Prof. Dr. John S. Snaith and Prof. Dr. Daniele Passarella

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “We are also investigating the role of microtubules in neurodegenerative diseases and potential microtubule-targeted therapies.” This and more about the story behind the front cover can be found on page 202.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPlusChem 3/2013 (pages 203–207)

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201390011

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemPlusChem 3/2013 (page 209)

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201390012

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Noninnocent Behavior of Nitrosoarene–Pyridine Hybrid Ligands: Ruthenium Complexes Bearing a 2-(2-Nitrosoaryl)Pyridine Monoanion Radical (pages 214–217)

      Siu-Chung Chan, Dr. Jason England, Wing-Chun Lee, Prof. Dr. Karl Wieghardt and Prof. Dr. Chun-Yuen Wong

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200314

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Redox-active ligands: Structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical studies of ruthenium(II) complexes bearing 2-(2-nitrosoaryl)pyridine ligands and their reduced analogues reveals the redox noninnocence of 2-(2-nitrosoaryl)pyridine (see scheme).

    2. Synthesis of Single-Crystalline LiMn2O4 and LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 Nanocrystals and Their Lithium Storage Properties (pages 218–221)

      Dr. Ziyang Lu, Xianhong Rui, Huiteng Tan, Wenyu Zhang, Prof. Huey Hoon Hng and Prof. Qingyu Yan

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Yolk–shell spheres as nanoreactors: Single-crystalline LiMn2O4 and LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 nanocrystals have been prepared by using yolk–shell spheres as nanoreactors to confine the size of the nanocrystals to a range of 14–19 nm (see scheme). These nanocrystals were subsequently employed as cathode materials and showed high lithium-ion storage capacities and stable charge–discharge cycling, especially at high current densities.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Preparation of Fluorescent Tubulin Binders (pages 222–226)

      Dr. Elena Riva, Dr. Martin Mattarella, Dr. Stella Borrelli, Dr. Michael S. Christodoulou, Dr. Daniele Cartelli, Dr. Marcus Main, Dr. Stephen Faulkner, Dr. Daniel Sykes, Prof. Dr. Graziella Cappelletti, Prof. Dr. John S. Snaith and Prof. Dr. Daniele Passarella

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A chip off the old block: Thiocolchicine, taxol and cephalomannine have been used as building blocks for the preparation of four different fluorescent compounds designed to image the tubulin/microtubule network in cells (see figure). Thiocolchicine gave the best results and the compound derived from conjugation with fluorescein minimally inhibits tubulin polymerization, is cell permeable and binds microtubules.

    2. Microwave-Assisted In Situ Synthesis of Graphene/PEDOT Hybrid and Its Application in Supercapacitors (pages 227–234)

      Dong Sun, Li Jin, Yun Chen, Prof. Jian-Rong Zhang and Prof. Jun-Jie Zhu

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200206

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Do it in the microwave: A graphene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (G/PEDOT) hybrid has been prepared by the in situ polymerization of EDOT monomer using the precursor of graphene, graphene oxide, as an oxidant under microwave heating. The G/PEDOT hybrid as a supercapacitor material exhibits high specific capacitance (see figure), excellent electrochemical stability, and high energy density.

    3. Understanding Electronic Ligand Perturbation over Successive Metal-Based Redox Potentials in Mononuclear Ruthenium–Aqua Complexes (pages 235–243)

      Dr. Lydia Vaquer, Dr. Pere Miró, Dr. Xavier Sala, Dr. Fernando Bozoglian, Dr. Ester Masllorens, Dr. Jordi Benet-Buchholz, Dr. Xavier Fontrodona, Dr. Teodor Parella, Dr. Isabel Romero, Dr. Anna Roglans, Dr. Montserrat Rodríguez, Dr. Carles Bo and Dr. Antoni Llobet

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200268

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It′s all relative: A family of ruthenium complexes containing polypyridyl and carbene ligands has been prepared and characterized from structural, spectroscopic, and redox viewpoints. A correlation between ΔE1/2—the difference between E1/2(RuIV/III) and E1/2(RuIII/II)—and the activity and selectivity of some catalytic oxidation processes has been established. A correlation between the number of carbene ligands and ΔE1/2 was also found (see figure).

    4. Synthesis of Water-Soluble, Multicolored Fluorescent ZnxCd1−xSe Quantum Dots for Developing Latent Fingerprints (pages 244–249)

      Xuejiao Yu, Shengli Zuo, Hai Xiong, Yingchun Yu, Prof. Jianjun Liu and Prof. Ruiqin Yang

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200286

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Latent fingerprints: ZnxCd1−xSe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in water through cation exchange between Cd2+ and ZnSe QDs. With increasing Cd2+, the emission wavelengths of these QDs shifts from 430 to 578 nm, the diffraction peaks shift to lower 2θ angles, and the unit cell volumes increase. These multicolored QDs were used to develop latent fingerprints by varying the fluorescent color of the QDs to produce the best images (see figure; MPA=mercaptopropionic acid).

    5. Controllable Fabrication of CuS Hierarchical Nanostructures and Their Optical, Photocatalytic, and Wave Absorption Properties (pages 250–258)

      Shuai He, Guang-Sheng Wang, Chang Lu, Xin Luo, Bo Wen, Lin Guo and Mao-Sheng Cao

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200287

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A series of CuS hierarchical nanostructures have been synthesized. The CuS nanostructures with large surface area show excellent photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue. The formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures was discussed. Selected CuS nanostructures possess excellent microwave absorbing properties. When the absorbers have a thickness is 3.5 mm, the minimum reflection loss can reach −76.4 dB at 12.64 GHz (see graph).

    6. Folic Acid Functionalized Nanoprobes for Fluorescence-, Dark-Field-, and Dual-Imaging-Based Selective Detection of Cancer Cells and Tissue (pages 259–267)

      Amit Ranjan Maity, Arindam Saha, Dr. Arun Roy and Dr. Nikhil R. Jana

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Probes with a preference: Folate-functionalized quantum dots, gold/silver nanoparticles, and magnetic quantum dots have been synthesized and used as fluorescence, dark-field, and dual-imaging probes for the selective detection of cancer cells and tissues (see figure).

    7. Catalytic Oxidation of Benzene on Liquid Ion-Exchanged Cu,H(Na)/ZSM-5 and Cu,H(Na)/Y Zeolites: Spin Trapping of Transient Radical Intermediates (pages 268–273)

      Alexander Kromer and Prof. Dr. Emil Roduner

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200285

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The zeolites ZSM-5 and Y were exchanged with copper ions, with the aim to oxidize benzene with molecular oxygen at ambient temperature in cyclohexane solution. Transient radical intermediates were detected in high yield using the spin trap technique. The Cu,H/ZSM-5 acts as a redox/Brønsted acid bifunctional catalyst and shows high activity for radical formation. Remarkably over 30 % of the benzene was converted into radicals (DMPO=5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide).

    8. Direct Growth of Fe2V4O13 Nanoribbons on a Stainless-Steel Mesh for Visible-Light Photoreduction of CO2 into Renewable Hydrocarbon Fuel and Degradation of Gaseous Isopropyl Alcohol (pages 274–278)

      Dr. Ping Li, Prof. Yong Zhou, Dr. Wenguang Tu, Dr. Qi Liu, Prof. Shicheng Yan and Prof. Zhigang Zou

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201200289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recyclable ribbons: Fe2V4O13 nanoribbons (see figure) growing on a stainless-steel mesh were fabricated by a simple and facile hydrothermal reaction. The nanoribbons can be easily recycled and used in the photocatalytic conversion of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) and in the degradation of gaseous isopropyl alcohol.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION