ChemPlusChem

Cover image for Vol. 79 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 79, Issue 1

Pages 1–180

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Assembly Dependent Fluorescence Enhancing Nucleic Acids in Sequence-Specific Detection of Double-Stranded DNA (ChemPlusChem 1/2014) (page 1)

      Dr. Osman Doluca, Dr. Tracy K. Hale, Dr. Patrick J. B. Edwards, Prof. Dr. Carlos González and Dr. Vyacheslav V. Filichev

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300370

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      The cover picture shows a DNA strand forming a highly stable G-quadruplex that can be converted into an efficient DNA triplex-forming oligonucleotide by incorporating a pyrene intercalator into the sequence. Further modification by a thiazole orange derivative results in a highly fluorescent DNA triplex that is formed even in the presence of complementary RNA. These properties pave the way to visualise genes in a sequence specific manner via DNA triplex formation in live cells. Further details can be found in the Full Paper on page 58 by Vyacheslav V. Filichev, Carlos González and co-workers.

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
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      Assembly Dependent Fluorescence Enhancing Nucleic Acids in Sequence-Specific Detection of Double-Stranded DNA (page 2)

      Dr. Osman Doluca, Dr. Tracy K. Hale, Dr. Patrick J. B. Edwards, Prof. Dr. Carlos González and Dr. Vyacheslav V. Filichev

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300369

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      The striking discriminative fluorescent property of our probes … opens an exciting opportunity to establish generally applicable gene visualisation protocols in live cells.” This and more about the story behind the cover in the Cover Profile can be found on page 2 and about the research itself on page 58.

  3. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
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      Back Cover: Fluorescent Nanodiamonds with Bioorthogonally Reactive Protein-Resistant Polymeric Coatings (ChemPlusChem 1/2014) (page 184)

      Dr. Ivan Rehor, Dr. Hana Mackova, Dr. Sergey K. Filippov, Dr. Jan Kucka, Dr. Vladimir Proks, Jitka Slegerova, Dr. Stuart Turner, Prof. Gustaaf Van Tendeloo, Dr. Miroslav Ledvina, Dr. Martin Hruby and Dr. Petr Cigler

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300395

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      The back cover picture shows fluorescent, near-IR-emitting diamond nanoparticles coated with a biocompatible polymer interface. The coating is partially peeled off from the particle to reveal the layered structure. First, an ultrathin silica layer is attached to the diamond core. The copolymer chains formed from N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide and alkyne-containing methacrylamide monomer are grafted from the silica layer. In their Full Paper on page 21, P. Cigler and co-workers show that thanks to their superior colloidal stability, the nanoparticles can be dissolved in an aqueous buffer of high ionic strength. The coating is translucent, and moreover, it is protein-resistant: it protects the particles against nonspecific protein adsorption.

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
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      A Growing Reputation with a Bright Future (pages 3–6)

      Dr. Marisa Spiniello

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300396

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      Towards a bright future: Take a look at the achievements and new features introduced in 2013 (Cover Profiles), and what′s new for 2014 (author interviews and the Early Career Series).

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
  7. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemPlusChem 1/2014 (page 19)

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201490001

  8. Interview

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
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    5. Editorial
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    7. News
    8. Masthead
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    10. Communications
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      Petr Cígler (page 20)

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300383

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      “If I were not a scientist … I definitely would be a musician. One time I almost decided to pursue a music career. But, fortunately, my attraction to chemistry proved stronger.” This and more about Petr Cígler can be found on page 20.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds with Bioorthogonally Reactive Protein-Resistant Polymeric Coatings (pages 21–24)

      Dr. Ivan Rehor, Dr. Hana Mackova, Dr. Sergey K. Filippov, Dr. Jan Kucka, Dr. Vladimir Proks, Jitka Slegerova, Dr. Stuart Turner, Prof. Gustaaf Van Tendeloo, Dr. Miroslav Ledvina, Dr. Martin Hruby and Dr. Petr Cigler

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300339

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      A shining example: Fluorescent nanodiamonds were coated by a thin layer of methacrylate copolymer enabling high-yield attachment of molecules by click chemistry (see scheme). The particles are protein-resistant and extremely colloidally stable in buffers and biological media. The polymer fully preserves the unique optical properties of the fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers that are crucial for bioimaging applications.

    2. Synthesis of Hybrid Cyclic Peptoids and Identification of Autophagy Enhancer (pages 25–30)

      Kolla Rajasekhar, Nagarjun Narayanaswamy, Piyush Mishra, S. N. Suresh, Dr. Ravi Manjithaya and Dr. T. Govindaraju

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300343

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      Simplicity makes the difference: A methodology for the synthesis of small and medium-size hybrid cyclic peptoids from functionalized N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine monomers is described. αN-Alkyl- and αN-acyl substituents enforce differential cyclization to 6- and 12-membered products, respectively. Screening of a cyclic peptoid library identified a potential enhancer of the autophagy process (see figure).

    3. Synthesis of Polyboronic Acid Functionalized Hierarchically Ordered Macro-/Mesoporous Silica for Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides for Mass Spectrometric Analysis (pages 31–34)

      Dr. Yinghua Yan, Prof. Chunhui Deng, Zhifang Zheng, Prof. Xiangmin Zhang and Prof. Pengyuan Yang

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300335

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      Hierarchically ordered macro/mesoporous silica materials have been prepared by a dual-templating approach using ordered polystyrene colloidal crystals as a hard template, amphiphilic triblock copolymer pluronic P123 as a soft template, and TEOS as the silica source. Then the boronic-acid-functionalized materials were used to selectively capture glycopeptides, thus taking advantage of macro/mesopores exhibiting fast mass transport and interactions between boronic acid and glycopeptides.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Masthead
    9. Interview
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Supramolecular Organogels Formed through Complementary Double-Helix Formation (pages 35–44)

      Dr. Motonori Banno, Prof. Zong-Quan Wu, Wataru Makiguchi, Prof. Yoshio Furusho and Prof. Eiji Yashima

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300108

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      Solidifying relationships: A complementary amidine–carboxylic acid based duplex, with a m-terphenyl backbone, forms an optically active fluorescent organogel as a result of supramolecular polymerization. The supramolecular organogel exhibits reversible thermo- and chemoresponsive behavior (see picture).

    2. Energy Transfer at the Zeolite L Boundaries: Towards Photo- and Electroresponsive Materials (pages 45–57)

      Dr. Fabio Cucinotta, Dr. Aurélie Guenet, Dr. Claudia Bizzarri, Wojciech Mróz, Dr. Chiara Botta, Dr. Begoña Milián-Medina, Dr. Johannes Gierschner and Prof. Luisa De Cola

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300272

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      Hybrid nanoarchitectures: Cationic iridium(III) complexes are used as stopper molecules for the channels of zeolite L. They act as effective donor units for transferring excitation energy to dye molecules entrapped in the zeolite channels. Hybrid light-emitting diodes can be fabricated with this material because the electrogenerated iridium excited state can sensitize the entrapped dyes (see picture).

    3. Assembly Dependent Fluorescence Enhancing Nucleic Acids in Sequence-Specific Detection of Double-Stranded DNA (pages 58–66)

      Dr. Osman Doluca, Dr. Tracy K. Hale, Dr. Patrick J. B. Edwards, Prof. Dr. Carlos González and Dr. Vyacheslav V. Filichev

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300310

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      A single attachment of the thiazole orange derivative to 2′-O-propargyl nucleotide in the structure of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) led to probes with low fluorescent intensity in the single-stranded state (ΦF=0.09–1.5 %; see figure). A significant increase in fluorescent intensity was detected after formation of DNA triplexes (ΦF=23.5–34.9 %). Under similar conditions, Watson–Crick-type duplexes showed low fluorescent intensities.

    4. Double Photoinduced Jahn–Teller Distortion of Tetrahedral AuI[BOND]SnII Complexes (pages 67–76)

      Dr. R. Vilma Bojan, Prof. Dr. José M. López-de-Luzuriaga, Dr. Miguel Monge, Dr. M. Elena Olmos, Raquel Echeverría, Dr. Olli Lehtonen and Prof. Dr. Dage Sundholm

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300314

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      Golden rules: Complexes [L3Au(SnCl3)] (L=PMe3 (1), PMe2Ph (2), PMePh2 (3), and PPh3 (4)) display tetrahedral environments for gold. Compounds 3 and 4 display low-energy phosphorescence in the solid state. The structural distortion of the lowest triplet excited state T1 for models of these compounds was analyzed. The large structural distortion of the T1 state arises from a first-order Jahn–Teller effect at the gold center and a second-order Jahn–Teller effect at the tin center (see figure).

    5. Quantification of Hydrogen Sulfide and Methanethiol and the Study of Their Scavenging by Biocides of the Isothiazolone Family (pages 77–82)

      Eric Frerot, Alain Bagnoud and Esmeralda Cicchetti

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300234

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      What a stinker: For the quantification of hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol, a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method with in-fibre derivatisation and GC–MS/MS analysis was developed and validated. It was used to demonstrate that biocides of the isothiazolinone family are able to trap these malodourous compounds (see figure). The mechanism of the scavenging reaction was studied by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-MS.

    6. Cooperative Effects in the Detection of a Nitroaliphatic Liquid Explosive and an Explosive Taggant in the Vapor Phase by Calix[4]arene-Based Carbazole-Containing Conjugated Polymers (pages 83–89)

      Patrícia D. Barata and Prof. José V. Prata

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300280

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      Detecting the threat from the mist! Recognition and signalizing events occurring in calix[4]arene–phenylene ethynylene–carbazolylene ethynylene complexes upon contact with nitroaliphatic guests are described (see picture).

    7. “Clicking” Porphyrins to Magnetic Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy (pages 90–98)

      Merlyn Thandu, Dr. Valentina Rapozzi, Prof. Dr. Luigi Xodo, Prof. Dr. Fernando Albericio, Dr. Clara Comuzzi and Dr. Silvia Cavalli

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300276

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      Theranostic nanoagents: A porphyrin is “clicked” to a rhodamine-TAT-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (see figure). Upon light irradiation, these nanodevices behave as promising theranostics for achieving the combined action of localizing and tracking drugs through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based techniques and treating cancer cells through photodynamic therapy (PDT).

    8. Oxidative Coupling of 1-Naphthols over Noble and Base Metal Catalysts (pages 99–106)

      Mabuatsela V. Maphoru, Prof. Dr. Josef Heveling and Dr. Sreejarani K. Pillai

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300307

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      Show your true colors: 1-Naphthols with electron-donating substituents at the ortho or para position couple oxidatively in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and metallic-state catalysts, such as platinum, gold, and nickel to give brightly colored conjugated diones. Yields of up to 99 % can be obtained within 20 minutes under mild reaction conditions (<60 °C and ambient pressure; see scheme).

    9. A Hierarchical Nanoporous PtCu Alloy as an Oxygen-Reduction Reaction Electrocatalyst with High Activity and Durability (pages 107–113)

      Prof. Caixia Xu, Huan Zhang, Qin Hao and Huimei Duan

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300311

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      A binding agreement: A hierarchical nanoporous PtCu (HNP-PtCu) alloy with a bimodal interconnected network nanostructure was easily fabricated based on a dealloying/annealing/redealloying strategy (see figure). With the specific bimodal nanoporous architecture, HNP-PtCu shows superior electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen-reduction reaction compared with Pt/C and single NP-PtCu catalysts.

    10. Solid-State Properties and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy in Solution of Hybrid Foldamers Stereoisomeric Mixtures (pages 114–121)

      Dr. Nicola Castellucci, Prof. Giuseppe Falini, Dr. Lorenzo Milli, Prof. Magda Monari, Prof. Sergio Abbate, Prof. Giovanna Longhi, Dr. Ettore Castiglioni, Dr. Giuseppe Mazzeo and Prof. Claudia Tomasini

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300306

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      Two wrongs make a right: A 1:1 mixture of Boc-(L-Phe-L-Oxd)2-OBn and Boc-L-Phe-L-Oxd-D-Phe-L-Phe-OBn (Boc = tert-butyloxycarbonyl; L-Oxd=trans-(4S,5R)-4-carboxy 5-methyloxazolidin-2-one, Bn=benzyloxycarbonyl; see picture) form single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction, whereas the two pure oligomers do not. This mixture forms crystals, fibers and globules, depending on the solvent.

    11. Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition of a Copper Gallium Oxide Spinel (pages 122–127)

      Dr. Caroline E. Knapp, Iasson D. Prassides, Dr. Sanjayan Sathasivam, Prof. Ivan P. Parkin and Prof. Claire J. Carmalt

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300289

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      Having a gas: Copper-based spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of a simple one-pot solution-based aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) method. AACVD of copper(II) 2,2,6,6,-tetramethylheptan-3,5-dionate and gallium(III) acetylacetonate (acac) in toluene resulted in the formation of CuGa2O4 films along with copper(I) oxide (Ga2O3 at the surface of the film; see scheme). Annealing the films resulted in oxidation and formation of CuGa2O4 and copper(II) oxide.

    12. Design of a Nitrogen-Doped, Carbon-Coated Li4Ti5O12 Nanocomposite with a Core–Shell Structure and Its Application for High-Rate Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 128–133)

      Dr. Hongsen Li, Dr. Laifa Shen, Jie Wang, Dr. Bing Ding, Dr. Ping Nie, Guiyin Xu, Xiaoyan Wang and Prof. Xiaogang Zhang

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300316

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      Made to fit: A nitrogen-doped, carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 nanocomposite with a core–shell structure has been synthesized using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimdazolium tricyanomethanide as the carbon source. The well-defined nanocomposite displays better cycling and rate performances than those of Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles, and has a superior lithium-storage capability even at high rates (see picture).

    13. Modulation of Reaction Kinetics for the Tuneable Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Quantum Clusters: Application of Gold Quantum Clusters as “Turn-Off” Sensing Probe for Sn4+ Ions (pages 134–142)

      Puneet Khandelwal, Dheeraj K. Singh, Subha Sadhu and Dr. Pankaj Poddar

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300319

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      To cap it off… The mineralization behavior of a cephalosporin antibiotic (cefadroxil (CFX)) for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles and quantum clusters (QCs) has been studied to assess the influence of different reaction parameters such as HAuCl4/CFX concentration, temperature, and pH (see picture). The sensing of Sn4+ ions has been demonstrated by using CFX-labeled Au QCs.

    14. Stable Cycling of Fe2O3 Nanorice as an Anode through Electrochemical Porousness and the Solid–Electrolyte Interphase Thermolysis Approach (pages 143–150)

      Dr. Jianwen Liang, Dr. Denghu Wei, Dr. Qiushi Cheng, Dr. Yongchun Zhu, Dr. Xiaona Li, Dr. Long Fan, Dr. Jingjing Zhang and Prof. Yitai Qian

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300324

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      Hollow grains: A new method for improving the cycling stability of Fe2O3 nanorice by combining electrochemical porousness and the solid–electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer thermolysis approach is proposed (see picture). This process can be applied to prepare porous Fe2O3 and enables coating of a porous SEI thermolysis layer on the surface of Fe2O3, leading to remarkable lithium storage performance.

    15. Access to Ultra-High-Molecular Weight Poly(ethylene) and Activity Boost in the Presence of Cyclopentene With Group 4 Bis-Amido Complexes (pages 151–162)

      Dr. Gurram Venkata Narayana, Guangjuan Xu, Dr. Dongren Wang, Dr. Wolfgang Frey and Prof. Dr. Michael R. Buchmeiser

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300378

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      Flying high: Novel Group 4 bis-amido complexes bearing the 6-[2-(diethylboryl)phenyl]pyrid-2-ylamido motif (see figure) have been synthesized and used for the synthesis of ultra-high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene). Addition of cyclopentene (CPE) boosts polymerization activity. The role of CPE has been elucidated.

    16. Surface-Modified TiO2 Photocatalysts Prepared by a Photosynthetic Route: Mechanism, Enhancement, and Limits (pages 163–170)

      Susann Neubert, Dr. Ayyappan Ramakrishnan, Dr. Jennifer Strunk, Haoyu Shi, Dr. Bastian Mei, Lidong Wang, Michal Bledowski, Dr. Dmitrii A. Guschin, Max Kauer, Dr. Yuemin Wang, Prof. Dr. Martin Muhler and Prof. Dr. Radim Beranek

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300277

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      Shedding light on things: Aromatic molecules like benzene or toluene can be activated by visible light (λ>455 nm) at the surface of TiO2, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous polymeric deposits on TiO2 (see figure). The photosynthesized surface-modified TiO2 shows enhanced photoactivity in the complete mineralization of 4-chlorophenol under visible-light irradiation.

    17. Encapsulated Ruthenium(II) Complexes in Biocompatible Poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) Nanoparticles for Application in Photodynamic Therapy (pages 171–180)

      Gaëlle Bœuf, Gaëlle V. Roullin, Dr. Juliette Moreau, Laurence Van Gulick, Dr. Nebraska Zambrano Pineda, Dr. Christine Terryn, Prof. Dominique Ploton, Prof. Marie Christine Andry, Prof. Françoise Chuburu, Dr. Sylvain Dukic, Prof. Michaël Molinari and Prof. Gilles Lemercier

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201300242

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      Leading light: Encapsulation and confinement of ruthenium complexes in biocompatible poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles has been performed. The Ru complex@PLGA nanosuspensions are stable. Once gathered in tumor tissues, irradiation would autoaccelerate the release and hence the toxicity of the Ru complex (see figure), thus making these nanoparticles candidates for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and two-photon excited PDT.

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