A Practical Approach for Ambient-Pressure Hydrogenations Using Pd on Porous Glass

Authors

  • Christine Schmöger,

    1. Institute for Technical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Lessingstrasse 12, 07743 Jena (Germany), Fax: (+49) 3641-948400
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  • Achim Stolle Dr.,

    1. Institute for Technical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Lessingstrasse 12, 07743 Jena (Germany), Fax: (+49) 3641-948400
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  • Werner Bonrath Dr.,

    1. Institute for Technical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Lessingstrasse 12, 07743 Jena (Germany), Fax: (+49) 3641-948400
    2. R&D Chemical Process Technology, DSM Nutritional Products, P.O. Box 2676, 4002 Basel (Switzerland)
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  • Bernd Ondruschka Prof. Dr.,

    1. Institute for Technical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Lessingstrasse 12, 07743 Jena (Germany), Fax: (+49) 3641-948400
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  • Thomas Keller Dr.,

    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena (Germany)
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  • Klaus D. Jandt Prof. Dr.

    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena (Germany)
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Abstract

A Pd on porous glass catalyst system was used in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of terpenoid substrates with dihydrogen at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A multitude of substances were hydrogenated selectively with yields of 90–100 %. In all experiments, only C[BOND]C, C[BOND]N, and N[BOND]N double bonds were hydrogenated. Studies revealed that carbonyl and aromatic double bonds are inert towards catalytic reduction with dihydrogen under the conditions employed. In some cases, hydrogenation was accompanied by isomerization, so that treatment of β-pinene, for example, afforded isomeric α-pinene, which was subsequently hydrogenated to pinane.

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