A Tandem Water-Splitting Device Based on a Bio-inspired Manganese Catalyst

Authors

  • Dr. Robin Brimblecombe,

    1. School of Chemistry and Australian Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia), Fax: (+61) 3 9905 4597
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  • Dr. Annette Koo,

    1. School of Chemistry and Australian Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia), Fax: (+61) 3 9905 4597
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  • Prof. G. Charles Dismukes,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, (USA)
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  • Dr. Gerhard F. Swiegers,

    1. Australian Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science and Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)
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  • Prof. Leone Spiccia

    1. School of Chemistry and Australian Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia), Fax: (+61) 3 9905 4597
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Abstract

original image

Multiple photoanodes, comprising a manganese water oxidation catalyst doped in a Nafion membrane, are combined in series and powered with two dye-sensitized solar cells. The tandem device is capable of direct, solar-driven splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen.

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