Chemical Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles Using Amine–Boranes

Authors

  • Dr. Suresh Babu Kalidindi,

    1. Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, 560012 (India), Fax: (+91) 80-2360 1552
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  • Udishnu Sanyal,

    1. Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, 560012 (India), Fax: (+91) 80-2360 1552
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  • Prof. Balaji R. Jagirdar

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, 560012 (India), Fax: (+91) 80-2360 1552
    • Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, 560012 (India), Fax: (+91) 80-2360 1552
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Abstract

The development of new synthetic strategies to obtain monodisperse metal nanoparticles on large scales is an attractive prospect in the context of sustainability. Recently, amine–boranes, the classical Lewis acid–base adducts, have been employed as reducing agents for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. They offer several advantages over the traditional reducing agents like the borohydrides; for example, a much better control of the rate of reduction and, hence, the particle size distribution of metal nanoparticles; diversity in their reducing abilities by varying the substituents on the nitrogen atom; and solubility in various protic and aprotic solvents. Amine–boranes have not only been used successfully as reducing agents in solution but also in solventless conditions, in which along with the reduction of the metal precursor, they undergo in situ transformation to afford the stabilizing agent for the generated metal nanoparticles, thereby bringing about atom economy as well. The use of amine boranes for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles has experienced an explosive growth in a very short period of time. In this Minireview, recent progress on the use of amine boranes for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, with a focus towards the development of pathways for sustainability, is discussed.

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