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Solvent-Free Conversion of Linalool to Methylcyclopentadiene Dimers: A Route To Renewable High-Density Fuels

Authors

  • Dr. Heather A. Meylemans,

    1. Research Department, Chemistry Division, US Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD), 1900 N. Knox Rd Stop 6303, China Lake, CA 93555 (USA), Fax: (+1) 760-939-1617
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  • Roxanne L. Quintana,

    1. Research Department, Chemistry Division, US Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD), 1900 N. Knox Rd Stop 6303, China Lake, CA 93555 (USA), Fax: (+1) 760-939-1617
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  • Bryan R. Goldsmith,

    1. Research Department, Chemistry Division, US Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD), 1900 N. Knox Rd Stop 6303, China Lake, CA 93555 (USA), Fax: (+1) 760-939-1617
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  • Dr. Benjamin G. Harvey

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Department, Chemistry Division, US Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD), 1900 N. Knox Rd Stop 6303, China Lake, CA 93555 (USA), Fax: (+1) 760-939-1617
    • Research Department, Chemistry Division, US Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD), 1900 N. Knox Rd Stop 6303, China Lake, CA 93555 (USA), Fax: (+1) 760-939-1617
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

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Neat biofuel in HD: Linalool, a linear terpene alcohol, can be selectively converted by ruthenium metathesis catalysts under solvent-free conditions to 1-methyl-cyclopent-2-enol and isobutylene in quantitative yield. Dehydration of the alcohol under mild conditions followed by low-temperature thermal dimerization yields methylcyclopentadiene dimer, which can be readily converted into a high-density fuel.

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