Get access
Advertisement

A Versatile Protocol for the Quantitative and Smooth Conversion of Phosphane Oxides into Synthetically Useful Pyrazolylphosphonium Salts

Authors

  • Kai-Oliver Feldmann,

    1. Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, WWU Münster, Corrensstr. 30, 48149 Münster (Germany), Fax: (+49) 251-83-33126
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stephen Schulz,

    1. Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, WWU Münster, Corrensstr. 30, 48149 Münster (Germany), Fax: (+49) 251-83-33126
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Felix Klotter,

    1. Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, WWU Münster, Corrensstr. 30, 48149 Münster (Germany), Fax: (+49) 251-83-33126
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Jan J. Weigand

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, WWU Münster, Corrensstr. 30, 48149 Münster (Germany), Fax: (+49) 251-83-33126
    • Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and Graduate School of Chemistry, WWU Münster, Corrensstr. 30, 48149 Münster (Germany), Fax: (+49) 251-83-33126
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A convenient protocol for the smooth conversion of the resistant P[BOND]O bond in phosphane oxides into a reactive P[BOND]N bond of synthetically useful pyrazolylphosphonium salts is described. A highly charged, oxophilic, phosphorus-centered trication is employed and the reactions are conducted at room temperature with quantitative yields. The resulting pyrazolylphosphonium cations are valuable synthetic intermediates and are used for the synthesis of a variety of organophosphorus compounds. This represents a new approach towards the transformation of the rather inert phosphoryl group under very mild reaction and workup conditions and aims towards alternatives to existing reduction methods for phosphane oxide functionalization.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary