Cover Picture: Solar Water Splitting: Progress Using Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Photoelectrodes (ChemSusChem 4/2011)

Authors

  • Dr. Kevin Sivula,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 21 693 41 11
    • Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 21 693 41 11
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  • Florian Le Formal,

    1. Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 21 693 41 11
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  • Prof. Dr. Michael Grätzel

    1. Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 21 693 41 11
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Abstract

original image

The cover picture shows the geologic features in the Valley of Fire State Park (Nevada, USA, photo courtesy Frank Kovalchek), which exhibit a red-orange color due to the large concentration of iron oxides. The most stable iron oxide, α-Fe2O3 or hematite, is a promising material for sustainable hydrogen production via solar water splitting. The recent progress in understanding and overcoming the limitations presented by this material is reviewed by Sivula et al. on page 432 of this issue.

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