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Efficient CO2 Capture by Porous, Nitrogen-Doped Carbonaceous Adsorbents Derived from Task-Specific Ionic Liquids

Authors

  • Xiang Zhu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, 200237 (PR China), Fax: (+86) 021-64252921
    2. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
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  • Dr. Patrick C. Hillesheim,

    1. Chemical Sciences Divisions, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA), Fax: (+1) 865-576-5235
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  • Shannon M. Mahurin,

    1. Chemical Sciences Divisions, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA), Fax: (+1) 865-576-5235
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  • Prof. Congmin Wang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
    2. Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (PR China), Fax: (+86) 571-8795-1895
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
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  • Chengcheng Tian,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, 200237 (PR China), Fax: (+86) 021-64252921
    2. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
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  • Suree Brown,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
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  • Dr. Huimin Luo,

    1. Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA)
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  • Dr. Gabriel M. Veith,

    1. Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA)
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  • Dr. Kee Sung Han,

    1. Chemical Sciences Divisions, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA), Fax: (+1) 865-576-5235
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  • Dr. Edward W. Hagaman,

    1. Chemical Sciences Divisions, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA), Fax: (+1) 865-576-5235
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  • Prof. Honglai Liu,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, 200237 (PR China), Fax: (+86) 021-64252921
    • State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, 200237 (PR China), Fax: (+86) 021-64252921
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  • Prof. Sheng Dai

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
    2. Chemical Sciences Divisions, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (USA), Fax: (+1) 865-576-5235
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (USA)
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Abstract

The search for a better carbon dioxide (CO2) capture material is attracting significant attention because of an increase in anthropogenic emissions. Porous materials are considered to be among the most promising candidates. A series of porous, nitrogen-doped carbons for CO2 capture have been developed by using high-yield carbonization reactions from task-specific ionic liquid (TSIL) precursors. Owing to strong interactions between the CO2 molecules and nitrogen-containing basic sites within the carbon framework, the porous nitrogen-doped compound derived from the carbonization of a TSIL at 500 °C, CN500, exhibits an exceptional CO2 absorption capacity of 193 mg of CO2 per g sorbent (4.39 mmol g−1 at 0 °C and 1 bar), which demonstrates a significantly higher capacity than previously reported adsorbents. The application of TSILs as precursors for porous materials provides a new avenue for the development of improved materials for carbon capture.

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