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The Synthesis and the Chemical and Physical Properties of Non-Aqueous Silylamine Solvents for Carbon Dioxide Capture

Authors

  • Amy L. Rohan,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Jackson R. Switzer,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Kyle M. Flack,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 911 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Ryan J. Hart,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Swetha Sivaswamy,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Elizabeth J. Biddinger,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Manish Talreja,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Manjusha Verma,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 911 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Sean Faltermeier,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Paul T. Nielsen,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Pamela Pollet,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 911 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    2. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • George F. Schuette,

    1. Phillips 66, Bartlesville, OK 74005 (USA)
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  • Prof. Charles A. Eckert,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 911 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    3. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Prof. Charles L. Liotta

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    2. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 911 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    3. Specialty Separations Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    • School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-9085
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Silylamine reversible ionic liquids were designed to achieve specific physical properties in order to address effective CO2 capture. The reversible ionic liquid systems reported herein represent a class of switchable solvents where a relatively non-polar silylamine (molecular liquid) is reversibly transformed to a reversible ionic liquid (RevIL) by reaction with CO2 (chemisorption). The RevILs can further capture additional CO2 through physical absorption (physisorption). The effects of changes in structure on (1) the CO2 capture capacity (chemisorption and physisorption), (2) the viscosity of the solvent systems at partial and total conversion to the ionic liquid state, (3) the energy required for reversing the CO2 capture process, and (4) the ability to recycle the solvents systems are reported.

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