Get access

Mechanical Activation of CaO-Based Adsorbents for CO2 Capture

Authors

  • Maryam Sayyah,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Yongqi Lu,

    1. Illinois State Geological Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 615 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Richard I. Masel,

    1. Dioxide Materials, 60 Hazelwood Drive, Champaign, IL 61820 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Kenneth S. Suslick

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA), Fax: (+1) 217-244-3186
    • Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA), Fax: (+1) 217-244-3186
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The reversible cycling of CaO adsorbents to CaCO3 for high-temperature CO2 capture is substantially improved by mechanical treatment. The mechanical milling intensity and conditions of grinding (e.g., wet vs. dry, planetary vs. vibratory milling) were determined to be the main factors that control the effectiveness of the mechanochemical synthesis to enhance the recycling stability of the sorbents prepared. In addition, MgO was used as an example of an inert binder to help mitigate CaCO3 sintering. Wet planetary milling of MgO into CaCO3 allowed efficient particle size reduction and the effective dispersion of MgO throughout the particles. Wet planetary milling yielded the most stable sorbents during 50 cycles of carbonation–calcination.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary