Get access
Advertisement

Microfocused X-ray Study on Precipitate Formation in the Separator Region of Nonaqueous Li–O2 Batteries

Authors

  • Dr. Jiang-Lan Shui,

    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (USA), Fax: (+1) 630-252-4176
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. John S. Okasinski,

    1. X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Dan Zhao,

    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (USA), Fax: (+1) 630-252-4176
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Jonathan D. Almer,

    1. X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Di-Jia Liu

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (USA), Fax: (+1) 630-252-4176
    • Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (USA), Fax: (+1) 630-252-4176
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Using a microfocused synchrotron X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) method, we systematically investigated the distributions of insoluble lithium precipitates, which formed through electrolyte decomposition, separately in all three regions (cathode, separator, and anode) of failed batteries with a spatial resolution of 20 μm. We found unexpectedly that there was a significantly higher concentration (almost twice as much) of precipitates in the separator than in the cathode. SEM revealed that the precipitates grew on the separator fiber surface, ultimately obstructing the pores serving as the ion-transport channel. A “refurbished” battery, which was composed of a spent separator from a failed battery, showed a much higher overpotential and shorter cycle life than that found in a new battery.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary