Enhanced Stability of (111)-Surface-Dominant Core–Shell Nanoparticle Catalysts Towards the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

Authors

  • Dr. Jianbo Wu,

    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 114 Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Miao Shi,

    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 114 Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. University of Rochester, 206 Gavett Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Xi Yin,

    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 114 Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Prof. Dr. Hong Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 114 Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 114 Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)

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Abstract

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Holy GRAILS: The synthesis of composition- and shape-controlled alloy@alloy core–shell multimetallic nanoparticles using the GRAILS method is reported. Pt-M@Pt-Pd (where M=Co and Ni) nanocrystals are synthesized in the forms of truncated and regular octahedra by using carbon monoxide. Compared to an octahedral Pt3Ni catalyst, the Pt3Ni@Pt3Pd catalyst shows a comparably high activity but better stability towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

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