Back Cover: Conversion of Cellulose into Isosorbide over Bifunctional Ruthenium Nanoparticles Supported on Niobium Phosphate (ChemSusChem 11/2013)

Authors

  • Dr. Peng Sun,

    1. Laboratory for Nano-catalytic Material & Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (PR China)
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  • Xiangdong Long,

    1. State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18, Lanzhou 730000 (PR China)
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  • Hao He,

    1. Laboratory for Biofuel and New Energy, PetroChina Petrochemical Research Institute, Beiwucun Road A 25, Beijing 100195 (PR China)
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  • Prof. Dr. Chungu Xia,

    1. State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18, Lanzhou 730000 (PR China)
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  • Prof. Dr. Fuwei Li

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Nano-catalytic Material & Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (PR China)
    2. State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18, Lanzhou 730000 (PR China)
    • Laboratory for Nano-catalytic Material & Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (PR China)

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Abstract

original image

The back cover image shows the production of isosorbide from the one-pot hydrolytic hydrogenation and dehydration of inedible cellulose. Dr Fuwei Li and co-workers show that isosorbide production can be achieved under hydrothermal conditions over a recyclable ruthenium catalyst supported on mesoporous niobium phosphate without the addition of soluble acids. This efficient and sustainable protocol could close the carbon cycle as a result of plants taking up CO2 generated from the end products. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Sun et. al on page 2190 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300701).

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