Superior Pseudocapacitive Behavior of Confined Lignin Nanocrystals for Renewable Energy-Storage Materials

Authors

  • Dr. Sung-Kon Kim,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Republic of Korea)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Yun Ki Kim,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Republic of Korea)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Dr. Hyunjoo Lee,

    1. Clean Energy Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Republic of Korea)
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  • Prof. Sang Bok Lee,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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  • Prof. Ho Seok Park

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Republic of Korea)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Republic of Korea)===

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Abstract

Strong demand for high-performance energy-storage devices has currently motivated the development of emerging capacitive materials that can resolve their critical challenge (i.e., low energy density) and that are renewable and inexpensive energy-storage materials from both environmental and economic viewpoints. Herein, the pseudocapacitive behavior of lignin nanocrystals confined on reduced graphene oxides (RGOs) used for renewable energy-storage materials is demonstrated. The excellent capacitive characteristics of the renewable hybrid electrodes were achieved by synergizing the fast and reversible redox charge transfer of surface-confined quinone and the interplay with electron-conducting RGOs. Accordingly, pseudocapacitors with remarkable rate and cyclic performances (∼96 % retention after 3000 cycles) showed a maximum capacitance of 432 F g−1, which was close to the theoretical capacitance of 482 F g−1 and sixfold higher than that of RGO (93 F g−1). The chemical strategy delineated herein paves the way to develop advanced renewable electrodes for energy-storage applications and understand the redox chemistry of electroactive biomaterials.

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