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Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Efficiency of a Hematite–Ordered Sb:SnO2 Host–Guest System

Authors

  • Dr. Lei Wang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, WW4-LKO University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)
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  • Dr. Anna Palacios-Padrós,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, WW4-LKO University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)
    2. Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)
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  • Dr. Robin Kirchgeorg,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, WW4-LKO University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)
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  • Dr. Alexei Tighineanu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, WW4-LKO University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Patrik Schmuki

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, WW4-LKO University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)
    2. Department of Chemistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, WW4-LKO University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

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Abstract

Host–guest systems such as hematite/SnO2 have attracted a great deal of interest as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In the present work we form an ordered porous tin oxide layer formed by self-organizing anodization of Sn films on a FTO substrate. Subsequently the anodic tin oxide nanostructure is doped with antimony (ATO) by a simple impregnation and annealing treatment, and then decorated with hematite using anodic deposition. Photoelectrochemical water splitting experiments show that compared to conventional SnO2 nanostructures, using a Sb doped nanochannel SnO2 as a host leads to a drastic increase of the water splitting photocurrent response up to 1.5 mA cm−2 at 1.6 V (vs. RHE) in 1 M KOH under AM 1.5 (100 mW cm−2) conditions compared to 0.04 mA cm−2 for the non-Sb doped SnO2 scaffold.

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