Selective Glycerol Oxidation by Electrocatalytic Dehydrogenation

Authors

  • Dr. Hyung Ju Kim,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (USA)
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  • Jechan Lee,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (USA)
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  • Sara K. Green,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, 686 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (USA)
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  • Prof. George W. Huber,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (USA)
    • George W. Huber, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (USA)===

      Won Bae Kim, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (South Korea)===

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  • Prof. Won Bae Kim

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (South Korea)
    • George W. Huber, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (USA)===

      Won Bae Kim, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (South Korea)===

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Abstract

This study demonstrates that an electrochemical dehydrogenation process can be used to oxidize glycerol to glyceraldehyde and glyceric acid even without using stoichiometric chemical oxidants. A glyceric acid selectivity of 87.0 % at 91.8 % glycerol conversion was obtained in an electrocatalytic batch reactor. A continuous-flow electrocatalytic reactor had over an 80 % high glyceric acid selectivity at 10 % glycerol conversion, as well as greater reaction rates than either an electrocatalytic or a conventional catalytic batch reactor.

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