ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 10

October 24, 2008

Volume 1, Issue 10

Pages 789–866

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Efficient Catalytic Decomposition of Formic Acid for the Selective Generation of H2 and H/D Exchange with a Water-Soluble Rhodium Complex in Aqueous Solution (ChemSusChem 10/2008) (page 789)

      Shunichi Fukuzumi, Takeshi Kobayashi and Tomoyoshi Suenobu

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890028

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      The cover picture shows a scheme for the efficient rhodium-catalyzed evolution of H2 or D2 from formic acid (HCOOH), a substance produced naturally by ants. The use of hydrogen as an environmentally benign secondary energy resource has attracted much attention, however, high-density storage and safe transportation of gaseous hydrogen remain problematic. An approach that can contribute also to cut carbon dioxide emissions is the use of CO2 as hydrogen carrier to produce formic acid, a water-soluble liquid which is easy to store and carry. In their Full Paper on page 827 ff., S. Fukuzumi et al. describe how HCOOH is efficiently and selectively decomposed to produce H2 and CO2 in 1:1 ratio without the formation of CO in aqueous solution at 298 K catalyzed by the water-soluble rhodium aqua complex [RhIII(Cp*)(bpy)(H2O)]SO4. H2 evolution occurs by formation of the hydride complex (Rh[BOND]H), which undergoes efficient H/D exchange with deuteron in D2O to form the deuteride complex (Rh[BOND]D) in competition with the reaction with deuteron to yield D2 and HD.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 10/2008 (pages 791–795)

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890029

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 10/2008 (pages 796–797)

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890030

  4. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
    1. Carbon Dioxide—The Hydrogen-Storage Material of the Future? (pages 801–804)

      Stephan Enthaler

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800101

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      Fuelling the economy: In the search for sustainable and renewable energy systems, the hydrogen economy could be an alternative if several requirements can be fulfilled in the future. One major challenge is still the search for appropriate hydrogen-storage systems. The potential application of carbon dioxide as a hydrogen carrier is discussed in this Highlight.

    2. Breakthroughs in Hydrogen Storage—Formic Acid as a Sustainable Storage Material for Hydrogen (pages 805–808)

      Ferenc Joó

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800133

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      A boost for fuel cells: Recent results suggest that formic acid is a convenient hydrogen-storage material: its decomposition yields CO-free hydrogen while the co-produced carbon dioxide can be hydrogenated back to formic acid. The hydrogen generated in this way is suitable for fuel cell applications.

  5. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
    1. Greening the Construction Industry: Enhancing the Performance of Cements by Adding Bioglycerol (pages 809–812)

      Michele Rossi, Cristina Della Pina, Mario Pagliaro, Rosaria Ciriminna and Paolo Forni

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800088

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      Greener building blocks: The addition of glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel manufacturing, to cement eases its grinding and handling while considerably enhancing the strength of the resulting concrete. For instance, less energy is needed to grind the so-called clinker (a calcined mixture of limestone, sand, clay, and iron ore) to the required particle size in a ball mill (see picture: photograph courtesy of Grace Construction Products).

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
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    1. Dimethyl Carbonate: An Eco-Friendly Solvent in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis Transformations (pages 813–816)

      Xiaowei Miao, Cédric Fischmeister, Christian Bruneau and Pierre H. Dixneuf

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800074

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      Ru 'n' DMC: A series of ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis transformations were performed in the eco-friendly solvent dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and it was demonstrated that this solvent can be used as a substitute to dichloromethane or aromatic solvents. The ethenolysis of methyl oleate using the first-generation Hoveyda catalyst was also performed in DMC, where similar conversions were observed to those in toluene (82 vs 88 %).

    2. Deep Desulfurization of Fossil Fuels by Air in the Absence of a Catalyst (pages 817–819)

      Xiaoding Xu, Jacob A. Moulijn, Eri Ito, Rudi Wagemans and Michiel Makkee

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800109

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      Desperately seeking desulfurization: Organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) in transportation fuels contribute to acid rain and can deactivate catalysts in automotive applications. A new catalyst-free method to convert OSCs into sulfones in lactones by air at 140 °C and atmospheric pressure has been developed which can be used in the removal of OSCs from oil fractions or as a post-treatment to remove refractory sulfur after standard hydrodesulfurization.

    3. Simple Synthesis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes from Natural Resources (pages 820–822)

      Morinobu Endo, Kenji Takeuchi, Yoong Ahm Kim, Ki Chul Park, Takuya Ichiki, Takuya Hayashi, Tomoyuki Fukuyo, Satoshi Iinou, Dang Sheng Su, Mauricio Terrones and Mildred S. Dresselhaus

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800150

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      Bucket-and-spade chemistry: An environmentally friendly and highly efficient method for growing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (T) on a large scale has been developed which uses naturally abundant resources, namely garnet sand (G) as a catalyst precursor and support, and city gas as the carbon source. The as-produced carbon nanotubes have a well-crystallized wall structure and are easily separated from the garnet sand by sonication.

    4. Copper-Catalyzed Highly Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols under Ambient Conditions (pages 823–825)

      Nan Jiang and Arthur J. Ragauskas

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800144

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      Up the TEMPO: A novel, three-component catalyst system consisting of acetamido-TEMPO, copper bromide, and 4-pyrrolidinopyridine not only gives the highest reported turnover frequencies (up to 200 turnovers per hour) for solvent-free aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes at ambient temperature and pressure, but also displays exceptionally high selectivity toward benzylic and allylic primary alcohols.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
    1. Efficient Catalytic Decomposition of Formic Acid for the Selective Generation of H2 and H/D Exchange with a Water-Soluble Rhodium Complex in Aqueous Solution (pages 827–834)

      Shunichi Fukuzumi, Takeshi Kobayashi and Tomoyoshi Suenobu

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800147

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      Forming formate and generating gas: The water-soluble rhodium aqua complex [RhIII(Cp*)(bpy)(H2O)]2+ efficiently and selectively catalyzes the decomposition of formic acid to H2 and CO2 in aqueous solution at 298 K. Hydrogen evolution occurs through formation of the formate complex, [RhIII(Cp*){OC(O)H}(bpy)]+, followed by a rate- determining β-hydrogen elimination to afford the hydride complex, [RhIII(Cp*)(H)(bpy)]+, the catalytic active species.

    2. Glycerol Upgrading over Zeolites by Batch-Reactor Liquid-Phase Oligomerization: Heterogeneous versus Homogeneous Reaction (pages 835–844)

      Yuni K. Krisnandi, Reinhard Eckelt, Matthias Schneider, Andreas Martin and Manfred Richter

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800128

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      Touching base: The selective conversion of glycerol to linear dimers was studied in a liquid-phase batch reaction at 260 °C under base catalysis. The reaction only marginally benefits from the use of Na/Cs-modified solid zeolites, as the crystallinity of the zeolite is lost within the first 2–6 h of reaction (see SEM images of CsX). The alkali cations are released into the liquid, and the reaction profile becomes similar to that of a homogeneously catalyzed reaction.

    3. DMAP as an Effective Catalyst To Accelerate the Solubilization of Waste Fiber-Reinforced Plastics (pages 845–850)

      Akio Kamimura, Kazuo Yamada, Tomohiro Kuratani, Yusuke Oishi, Takeru Watanabe, Takayuki Yoshida and Fumiaki Tomonaga

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800151

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      Break up, make up: Waste fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP), which is a difficult plastic in terms of monomer recycling, can be efficiently depolymerized in the presence of 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP) in supercritical methanol. The present method also enables separation of the FRP into its monomeric material, linker units, and inorganic ingredients such as glass fiber and filler, all ready for recycling.

    4. Efficient Synthesis of Dimethyl Ether over HZSM-5 Supported on Medium-Surface-Area β-SiC Foam (pages 851–857)

      Svetlana Ivanova, Estelle Vanhaecke, Benoit Louis, Suzanne Libs, Marc-Jacques Ledoux, Sévérine Rigolet, Claire Marichal, Charlotte Pham, Francis Luck and Cuong Pham-Huu

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800024

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      Foam lends support: The performance of a supported zeolite catalyst was studied in the methanol dehydration reaction to produce dimethyl ether. The smaller size of the HZSM-5 zeolite particles supported on β-SiC foam as compared to regular HZSM-5 particles leads to better diffusion of reactant molecules in and product molecules out of the catalyst, in turn leading to superior catalyst stability and better resistance to deactivation.

  8. Interview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
  9. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlights
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Interview
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 11/2008 (page 866)

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890031

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