ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 6

June 23, 2008

Volume 1, Issue 6

Pages 473–570

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Enhancing H2 and CO Production from Glycerol Using Bimetallic Surfaces (ChemSusChem 6/2008) (page 473)

      Orest Skoplyak, Mark A. Barteau and Jingguang G. Chen

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through reforming of oxygenates such as glycerol, ethylene glycol, and ethanol over a Ni monolayer on Pt(111) surface, designated Ni-Pt-Pt(111). This bimetallic surface exhibits stronger interactions with adsorbates as compared to unmodified Pt(111), increasing the activity for C[BOND]H and O[BOND]H scission reactions of interest in oxygenate reforming. In their Communication on page 524 ff., M. A. Barteau et al. report that the reforming activity of glycerol on the Ni-Pt-Pt(111) surfaces is increased as compared to that on Pt(111), Ni(111), and Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surfaces. The trend of glycerol reforming activity is similar to previous results for ethylene glycol and ethanol, with increasing activity as the surface d band center shifts closer to the Fermi level. The results demonstrate that the smaller oxygenates can be used as good models for reforming of larger, biomass-derived oxygenates.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
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  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. Current and Foreseeable Applications of Supercritical Water for Energy and the Environment (pages 486–503)

      Anne Loppinet-Serani, Cyril Aymonier and François Cansell

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200700167

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      Critical times, supercritical measures: The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process has been studied intensively during the past 15 years and proved efficient in decomposing organic matter. Armed with this know-how, researchers can now develop supercritical water biomass valorization for the production of gases and valuable chemicals (supercritical water biomass gasification (SCBG) or liquefaction (SCBL), respectively).

  5. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. Iron-Catalyzed Hydrogenation, Hydride Transfer, and Hydrosilylation: An Alternative to Precious-Metal Complexes? (pages 505–509)

      Sylvain Gaillard and Jean-Luc Renaud

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800071

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      The dawn of a new iron age? Iron is one of the least expensive and non-toxic metals, however, its chemistry has remained less studied than that of precious metals. Recent advances in reduction chemistry using iron complexes as catalysts are reviewed and the great potential of this cheap but chic metal is illustrated in this Highlight.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. New Reaction: Conversion of Glycerol into Acrylonitrile (pages 511–513)

      M. Olga Guerrero-Pérez and Miguel A. Bañares

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800023

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      A high-value conversion: Acrylonitrile, a monomer in the manufacture of synthetic polymers, is typically produced from propylene. However, a new sustainable process has been developed in which glycerol, a renewable resource (by-product in the manufacture of biodiesel), is treated with ammonia under moderate reaction conditions to give this value-added product.

    2. Soft Microporous Green Materials from Natural Soybean Oil (pages 514–518)

      Lyubov Lukyanova, Roberto Castangia, Sophie Franceschi-Messant, Emile Perez and Isabelle Rico-Lattes

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800036

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      Sweet or savory? Controlled porosity has been introduced in a gelled soybean oil by employing a particulate leaching method with sugar and salt templates. The materials resulting from unmodified natural soybean oil show high porosity and important water-draining properties. These new biodegradable soft materials may be suitable for high-technology applications such as tissue engineering or pollutant scavenging.

    3. Toward Environmentally Benign Oxidations: Bulk Mixed Mo-V-(Te-Nb)-O M1 Phase Catalysts for the Selective Ammoxidation of Propane (pages 519–523)

      N. Raveendran Shiju, Vadim V. Guliants, Steven H. Overbury and Adam J. Rondinone

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800039

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      A friendly phase: Bulk mixed-metal Mo-V-Te-Nb oxides are highly promising catalysts for the environmentally friendly selective ammoxidation of propane to acrylonitrile and oxidation of propane to acrylic acid. In this context, the crystal structures and catalytic behavior of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O, Mo-V-Te-O, and Mo-V-O M1 phase catalysts have been studied.

    4. Enhancing H2 and CO Production from Glycerol Using Bimetallic Surfaces (pages 524–526)

      Orest Skoplyak, Mark A. Barteau and Jingguang G. Chen

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Scratching the surface: The reactions of oxygenates such as glycerol are important for the production of H2. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments have revealed an increased production of H2 on the Ni surface monolayer on Pt(111) (Ni-Pt-Pt(111)). Glycerol reforming activity trends are similar to previous results for ethylene glycol and ethanol, demonstrating that smaller oxygenates can be used as good models for reforming of larger, biomass-derived oxygenates.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. Preparation of Ni-Based Metal Monolithic Catalysts and a Study of Their Performance in Methane Reforming with CO2 (pages 527–533)

      Kai Wang, Xiujin Li, Shengfu Ji, Bingyao Huang and Chengyue Li

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200700078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nickelback: A series of Ni-based (Ni/SBA-15/Al2O3/FeCrAl) metal monolithic catalysts with different Ni loadings (3–16 %) were prepared, and their catalytic activity was evaluated in methane reforming with CO2 to produce syngas. The catalyst with a Ni loading of 8.0 % displays excellent catalytic activity and stability over 1400 h at 800 °C.

    2. Immobilization of Cobalt(II) Schiff Base Complexes on Polystyrene Resin and a Study of Their Catalytic Activity for the Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols (pages 534–541)

      Suman Jain and Oliver Reiser

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800025

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      One resin, two strategies: Polystyrene-supported CoII Schiff base complexes can be efficiently prepared using either Staudinger ligation or copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) as the key step. The complexes catalyze the aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones in high yields and with high selectivity in multiple cycles without loss of activity.

    3. Acyclic Diene Metathesis with a Monomer from Renewable Resources: Control of Molecular Weight and One-Step Preparation of Block Copolymers (pages 542–547)

      Anastasiya Rybak and Michael A. R. Meier

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800047

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      As easy as ABA: A variety of polyesters, including ABA triblock copolymers, were prepared through a one-step acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization with undecyl undecenoate, a monomer from renewable resources. The molecular weights of the polymers could be controlled through the choice of metathesis catalyst as well as the amount of chain stopper used.

    4. Ring Opening of Methylcyclohexane over Platinum-Loaded Zeolites (pages 548–557)

      Vincenzo Calemma, Angela Carati, Cristina Flego, Roberto Giardino, Federica Gagliardi, Roberto Millini and Giuseppe Bellussi

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going platinum: Extremely selective catalysts are necessary to improve the cetane number of products obtained from hydroconverting highly aromatic streams for use in fuel blending. In this context, the activity of different Pt-loaded zeolites (Mordenite, ZSM-12, ZSM-5, ZSM-23) was investigated for the hydroconversion of methylcyclohexane.

    5. High-Strength Cellulose/Poly(ethylene glycol) Gels (pages 558–563)

      Songmiao Liang, Junjie Wu, Huafeng Tian, Lina Zhang and Jian Xu

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It gels well: Cellulose gel membranes swollen with low-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol (PEG; MW<1000 g mol−1) were prepared and studied. A strong hydrogen-bonding interaction occurs between PEG and cellulose leading to a homogeneous structure, high mechanical strength and good transparency of the resulting gel membranes.

  8. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. Beyond Wishful Thinking and Sweet Dreams (pages 565–568)

      Axel Jacobi von Wangelin

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800095

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Conference Report
    10. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 7/2008 (page 570)

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890019

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