ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 7

July 21, 2008

Volume 1, Issue 7

Pages 573–658

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: An Improved Perylene Sensitizer for Solar Cell Applications (ChemSusChem 7/2008) (page 573)

      Chen Li, Jun-Ho Yum, Soo-Jin Moon, Andreas Herrmann, Felix Eickemeyer, Neil G. Pschirer, Peter Erk, Jan Schöneboom, Klaus Müllen, Michael Grätzel and Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the working principle of a dye-sensitized solar cell based on a novel perylene organic sensitizer (dye), which exhibits two absorption bands at 620 and 462 nm and reversible oxidation and reduction potentials. The energetic alignment of the HOMO and LUMO of the dye is well suited for electron injection into the TiO2 conduction band as well as for regeneration of the dye by either an electrolyte containing a redox system or a solid-state hole conductor. In their Communication on page 615 ff., M. K. Nazeeruddin et al. report that a solar cell comprised of perylene-anchored TiO2 films and the iodine–iodide redox couple yields an unprecedented incident monochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 87%. The thiophenol donor groups provide directionality in the excited state leading to an improved short-circuit current density, open-circuit potential, and power conversion efficiency under standard AM 1.5 solar conditions.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
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      Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 7/2008 (pages 575–578)

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890021

  3. Retraction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    10. Book Review
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      Synthesis of Mesoporous La-, Cu-, and Cr-Doped Aluminophosphates and Their Catalytic Behavior in the Dehydration of Glycerol (page 578)

      Shao-You Liu, Chun-Jiao Zhou, Qi Liu, Guo-Cong Liu, Cai-Juan Huang and Zi-Sheng Chao

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800035

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    10. Book Review
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    1. Rational Design of Solid Catalysts for the Selective Use of Glycerol as a Natural Organic Building Block (pages 586–613)

      François Jérôme, Yannick Pouilloux and Joël Barrault

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One man's junk is another's treasure: From biodiesel waste to sustainable chemistry, glycerol has emerged as an important organic building block that can be reacted with various organic substrates over solid catalysts in environmentally friendly processes. These pathways offer a promising alternative to the use of highly toxic and expensive building blocks such as epichlorohydrin, 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol, and glycidol.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. An Improved Perylene Sensitizer for Solar Cell Applications (pages 615–618)

      Chen Li, Jun-Ho Yum, Soo-Jin Moon, Andreas Herrmann, Felix Eickemeyer, Neil G. Pschirer, Peter Erk, Jan Schöneboom, Klaus Müllen, Michael Grätzel and Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sunny side up: 1,6-Dithiophenol-substituted perylene organic sensitizer 1 was synthesized, and its photovoltaic properties in dye-sensitized solar cells were assessed. When anchored onto TiO2 film, the dye exhibits an unprecedented incident monochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 87 % and yields a power conversion efficiency of 6.8 % under standard AM 1.5 solar conditions.

    2. Nanocolloidal Pd-Au as Catalyst for the Direct Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide from H2 and O2 (pages 619–621)

      Yohei Nomura, Tatsumi Ishihara, Yuiko Hata, Kotaro Kitawaki, Kenji Kaneko and Hiroshige Matsumoto

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800029

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Every colloid has a gold lining: The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen is attracting much interest as an alternative method for producing H2O2. Pd-Au bimetallic nanocolloid exhibits high catalytic activity for the direct synthesis of H2O2 from H2 and O2. The high activity results from the presence of Au on the colloid surface which suppresses the decomposition of H2O2 in the presence of H2.

    3. Mechanochemical Solid-State Suzuki Reactions Using an In Situ Generated Base (pages 622–625)

      Franziska Schneider and Bernd Ondruschka

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800086

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Run of the 'mill: An inorganic support (KF-Al2O3) was used to generate the base in situ for Suzuki reactions carried out using mechanochemical treatment in a ball mill. Various aryl halides were tested in the Pd-catalyzed coupling reaction with phenylboronic acid and KF-Al2O3. The best results were obtained with aryl bromides.

    4. Selective Degradation of Wood Lignin over Noble-Metal Catalysts in a Two-Step Process (pages 626–629)

      Ning Yan, Chen Zhao, Paul J. Dyson, Chen Wang, Ling-tao Liu and Yuan Kou

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Breaking down is usually hard to do… The direct conversion of lignin into alkanes and methanol was carried out in a two-step process (hydogenolysis and hydrogenation) involving initial treatment of white birch wood sawdust with H2 in dioxane/water/phosphoric acid using Rh/C as the catalyst. The resulting monomers and dimers obtained by selective C[BOND]O hydrogenolysis were then hydrogenated in near-critical water employing Pd/C as the catalyst.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. A Property-Matched Water-Soluble Analogue of the Benchmark Ligand PPh3 (pages 631–636)

      Michel Ferreira, Hervé Bricout, Frédéric Hapiot, Adlane Sayede, Sébastien Tilloy and Eric Monflier

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Like a fish in water: A true water-soluble analogue of PPh3 has been prepared starting from biphenyl bromide (see structure). The cone angle and the basicity of the trisulfonated trisbiphenylphosphane are similar to those of PPh3 and result in a similar coordination mode in palladium and rhodium complexes. The water-soluble phosphane proved efficient as a ligand in aqueous hydroformylation and Tsuji–Trost reactions.

    2. A Highly Active Water-Soluble Cross-Coupling Catalyst Based on Dendritic Polyglycerol N-Heterocyclic Carbene Palladium Complexes (pages 637–642)

      Markus Meise and Rainer Haag

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800042

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A Cat. with many tails: Dendritic polyglycerol (PG)-supported N-heterocyclic carbene–palladium complexes were developed and applied to Suzuki cross-coupling reactions. A variety of substrates were tested, and even pyridineboronic acids, which typically do not give good conversions, were coupled successfully in the presence of the dendritic catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst could be reused up to four times.

    3. The Crucial Role of the K+–Aluminium Oxide Interaction in K+-Promoted Alumina- and Hydrotalcite-Based Materials for CO2 Sorption at High Temperatures (pages 643–650)

      Stéphane Walspurger, Luciaan Boels, Paul D. Cobden, Gerard D. Elzinga, Wim G. Haije and Ruud W. van den Brink

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An important interaction: K2CO3-promoted hydrotalcite-based and alumina-based materials are cheap and excellent materials for high-temperature (300–500 °C) adsorption of CO2 and particularly promising in the sorption-enhanced water gas shift reaction. Potassium ions strongly interact with aluminium oxide centres in aluminium-containing materials and generate basic sites in hydrotalcite which reversibly adsorb CO2 at 400 °C.

  8. Viewpoint

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. Chemical Engineering Challenges and Investment Opportunities in Sustainable Energy (pages 651–652)

      Adam Heller

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Opportunity knocks: The chemical and energy industries are currently undergoing an important transformation with increasing petroleum prices and the impact of global warming. As a result, engineering challenges and investment opportunities abound as highlighted in this Viewpoint.

  9. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Retraction
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Viewpoint
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 8/2008 (page 658)

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890023

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