ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 8‐9

Special Issue: 2nd EuCheMS Chemistry Congress

September 1, 2008

Volume 1, Issue 8-9

Pages 661–786

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Oriented Nanostructures for Energy Conversion and Storage (ChemSusChem 8-9-9/2008) (page 661)

      Jun Liu, Guozhong Cao, Zhenguo Yang, Donghai Wang, Dan Dubois, Xiaodong Zhou, Gordon L. Graff, Larry R. Pederson and Ji-Guang Zhang

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows an idealized membrane reactor which utilizes solar energy to drive chemical reactions to produce hydrogen and convert CO2 into useful chemicals. Oriented nanomaterials have demonstrated great potential in photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors, and thermoelectrics, as J. Liu, G. Z. Cao, Z. Yang et al. discuss in their Review on page 676 ff. Such oriented nanostructures also provide ideal platforms for next-generation energy-conversion and -storage devices. For a device such as the idealized membrane reactor to function, efficient semiconductors to harvest sunlight as well as efficient catalysts have to be developed and integrated with electron- and proton-conductive membranes. Although such an efficient and integrated membrane reactor has not yet been demonstrated, self-assembled and oriented nanoporous arrays have the desired architecture to potentially construct such a device.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
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      “Greening Chemistry”—in Turin and the World (page 663)

      Gabriele Centi

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800149

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Oriented Nanostructures for Energy Conversion and Storage (pages 676–697)

      Jun Liu, Guozhong Cao, Zhenguo Yang, Donghai Wang, Dan Dubois, Xiaodong Zhou, Gordon L. Graff, Larry R. Pederson and Ji-Guang Zhang

      Version of Record online: 11 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800087

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      So small, but so much potential: Oriented nanostructures show promising properties for energy-storage and -conversion applications such as photovoltaics and thermo-/electrochemical energy storage owing to their high surface areas, optimum dimensions and architecture, controlled pore channels, and alignment of their nanocrystalline phases.

  6. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Recent Developments in Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 699–707)

      Jun-Ho Yum, Peter Chen, Michael Grätzel and Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800084

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      A sunny outlook: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted much attention owing to their stability, low cost, and cell efficiency. To overcome the disadvantages of liquid electrolyte based DSSCs, solid-state DSSCs using organic and inorganic hole-transport materials have been investigated and good power conversion efficiencies have been observed. The current state of the art of solid-state DSSC technology is discussed in the Minireview.

    2. Phytoremediation of Organic Contaminants in Soil and Groundwater (pages 708–717)

      Thomas G. Reichenauer and James J. Germida

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800125

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      Green-fingered chemistry: Plants are chemical factories that can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Organic contaminants can be taken up by plants and treated in the plant metabolism similar to naturally occurring secondary compounds. These contaminants can also be degraded by microorganisms living in the rhizosphere of plants. The growth and activity of these microorganisms are supported by plant root exudates.

    3. Heterogeneous Multifunctional Catalysts for Tandem Processes: An Approach toward Sustainability (pages 718–724)

      François-Xavier Felpin and Eric Fouquet

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800110

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      Must be able to multitask: The development of heterogeneous mono- or multimetallic catalysts that are able to promote two or more reactions in the same reaction vessel provides a powerful approach toward sustainable chemistry. Such an approach is of significant interest for the synthesis of complex targets through ecologically benign routes.

  7. Concepts

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Catalytic Strategies for Changing the Energy Content and Achieving C[BOND]C Coupling in Biomass-Derived Oxygenated Hydrocarbons (pages 725–733)

      Dante A. Simonetti and James A. Dumesic

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800105

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      Sugar rush: Cost-competitive processes for the conversion of lignocellulose-derived carbohydrates will utilize coupling of catalysts and catalytic processes to various extents to integrate reduction steps with C[BOND]C bond-formation reactions to produce targeted molecules with high energy densities that are suitable for transportation fuels.

    2. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass: Challenges and Issues (pages 734–737)

      Pierre Gallezot

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800091

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      It's not easy being green! New value chains and catalytic systems must be developed to decrease the cost of biomass processing to bioproducts as those employed for hydrocarbons are not adapted to biomolecules. However, the extensive use of biomass for industrial production raises environmental and ethical issues, which in turn raise doubts on the sustainability of these processes.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Coupling Fatty Acids by Ketonic Decarboxylation Using Solid Catalysts for the Direct Production of Diesel, Lubricants, and Chemicals (pages 739–741)

      Avelino Corma, Michael Renz and Colin Schaverien

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800103

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      In bed with magnesium: Long-chain alkanes that can be used as alternative premium diesel or lubricants can be obtained by a four-step process in a single reactor with two catalyst beds. First, two fatty acid molecules are coupled by ketonic decarboxylation over MgO. The carbonyl product is then hydrogenated, and after the elimination of water the resulting olefin is further hydrogenated to produce the alkane in up to 58 % yield (Pt/MgO).

    2. Hybrid Materials for CO2 Uptake from Simulated Flue Gases: Xerogels Containing Diamines (pages 742–745)

      Angela Dibenedetto, Carlo Pastore, Carlo Fragale and Michele Aresta

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800090

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      Quick on the uptake: The mechanism of uptake of CO2 from simulated flue gases by mono- and disilyl amines, either in their free form, as organic (wet) solutions, or as xerogels, was investigated, and the products formed were characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy. Several absorption/desorption cycles were carried out which revealed a reversible uptake of CO2 and confirmed the stability of the amines.

    3. Efficient Microwave Oxidation of Alcohols Using Low-Loaded Supported Metallic Iron Nanoparticles (pages 746–750)

      Camino González-Arellano, Juan M. Campelo, Duncan J. Macquarrie, Jose M. Marinas, Antonio A. Romero and Rafael Luque

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800113

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      The iron revolution: Highly active and stable iron nanoparticles have been prepared on a range of supports using a facile and environmentally friendly microwave approach. The inexpensive metallic iron nanoparticles were found to be extremely active and selective in the oxidation of various alcohols, achieving excellent turnover numbers. Fe/MCM-41 was found to be highly reusable, preserving and even slightly increasing its activity after several uses.

  9. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Hydrogen Generation at Ambient Conditions: Application in Fuel Cells (pages 751–758)

      Albert Boddien, Björn Loges, Henrik Junge and Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800093

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      Fuelling the future: Hydrogen can be generated from formic acid/amine adducts at room temperature and used directly in fuel cells. Ruthenium phosphine systems are active catalysts in this transformation. High turnover numbers are observed for [{RuCl2(benzene)}2] in the presence of the bidentate ligand 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane. A similar enhancement in catalytic activities is observed with ruthenium bromide complexes.

    2. Ionic Liquid Supported Acid/Base-Catalyzed Production of Biodiesel (pages 759–762)

      Alexandre A. M. Lapis, Luciane F. de Oliveira, Brenno A. D. Neto and Jairton Dupont

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800077

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      Rising to the top: The transesterification reaction was successfully applied to synthesize biodiesel (mono-alcohol fatty acid esters) from vegetable oils in imidazolium-based ionic liquids under acid/base conditions. Dilute sulfuric acid or potassium carbonate supported on the ionic liquids act as efficient catalysts for the reaction. The biodiesel product forms a separate phase, and the catalyst can be reused for subsequent transesterification reactions.

    3. Oxidation of Lignin Using Aqueous Polyoxometalates in the Presence of Alcohols (pages 763–769)

      Tobias Voitl and Philipp Rudolf von Rohr

      Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800050

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      Kraft work: The polyoxometalate H3PMo12O40 serves as a multifunctional catalyst in the conversion of Kraft lignin. As a redox catalyst it promotes the degradation of lignin, whereas as an acid catalyst it promotes the conversion of methanol into dimethyl ether (DME). The presence of methanol as an additive prevents lignin from undergoing repolymerization reactions by generating radicals that couple with the lignin fragments.

  10. Viewpoints

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. SusChem Materials Technology—Energy Efficiency Is One Key Driver for Sustainable Materials Development (pages 771–772)

      Wendel Wohlleben and Rüdiger Iden

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800107

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      Sustainability in action: The European Technology Platform for Sustainable Chemistry (SusChem) has become a significant focus for the chemical, chemical engineering and biotechnology community across Europe. Its three key technology areas, namely materials technology, industrial biotechnology and reaction & process design, are discussed in more detail in this series of Viewpoints.

    2. SusChem Industrial Biotechnology—Potentials and Challenges in Industrial Biotech in Europe (pages 773–774)

      Camille Burel

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800114

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      Sustainability in action: The European Technology Platform for Sustainable Chemistry (SusChem) has become a significant focus for the chemical, chemical engineering and biotechnology community across Europe. Its three key technology areas, namely materials technology, industrial biotechnology and reaction & process design, are discussed in more detail in this series of Viewpoints.

    3. SusChem Reaction & Process Design—Sustainable and Competitive Chemical Production in Europe (pages 775–776)

      Alexis Bazzanella

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800131

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      Sustainability in action: The European Technology Platform for Sustainable Chemistry (SusChem) has become a significant focus for the chemical, chemical engineering and biotechnology community across Europe. Its three key technology areas, namely materials technology, industrial biotechnology and reaction & process design, are discussed in more detail in this series of Viewpoints.

    4. Towards Sustainable and Renewable Systems for Electrochemical Energy Storage (pages 777–779)

      Jean-Marie Tarascon

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800143

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      Energizing battery research: Electrochemical energy storage relies upon electrode materials, which are obtained by energy intensive processes. To reduce cost and environmental impact, future storage concepts will derive inspiration from living organisms as highlighted in this Viewpoint.

  11. Interview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
  12. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. Nanoparticles and Catalysis. Edited by Didier Astruc. (pages 783–784)

      Carlos A. Martínez-Huitle

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800116

  13. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Viewpoints
    12. Interview
    13. Book Reviews
    14. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 10/2008 (page 786)

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200890027

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