ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 10

October 19, 2009

Volume 2, Issue 10

Pages 893–979

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Article
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    1. Cover Picture: Optimization of Oxygen Activation Fuel-Cell Electrocatalysts by Combinatorial Designs (ChemSusChem 10/2009) (page 893)

      José M. Serra and Vicente B. Vert

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990037

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      The cover picture image by José M. Serra and Vicente B. Vert of the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain) is based on their research towards highly active oxygen activation fuel-cell electrocatalysts. In their Communication on p. 957, they describe how the screening of a well-designed combinatorial library of crystalline catalysts reveals unexpected cooperative effects between different promoters. The experimental design chosen is a quaternary mixture diagram (solid tetrahedron) and the outcome of the screening is the identification of optimized ternary crystalline compounds combining high electrochemical activity and relatively low activation energy. These features suggest that the materials are well-suited for operation as fuel cell cathodes at intermediate temperatures (550–650 °C)—as shown in the work—and as catalytic layers on oxygen-permeable membranes. The work is supported by physico-chemical and structural characterization as well as data modeling, including neural networks.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Article
    9. Preview
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  3. News

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
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  4. Concept

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    1. Sustainable Chemistry Metrics (pages 905–919)

      Francisco García Calvo-Flores

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900128

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      Green machine: There are many parameters that attempt to quantify the sustainability of chemical reactions or methods. This Concept article evaluates and interconnects these parameters, and describes their suitability for assessing different parts of complex processes. Particular emphasis is placed on the necessity of integrating these metrics into everyday practice.

  5. Minireviews

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    4. News
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    7. Communications
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    1. Selectivity versus Mobility: Separation of Anode and Cathode in Microbial Bioelectrochemical Systems (pages 921–926)

      Falk Harnisch and Uwe Schröder

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900111

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      Selectivity versus mobility: The separation of anode and cathode in microbial bioelectrochemical systems is a severe issue. The used setup should allow a high mobility of H+ (or OH) ions and simultaneously avoid the crossover of the other substances. This Minireview elucidates this principal conflict of selectivity versus mobility together with the consequences of the nonideal behavior of real separators, and discusses the proposed technological solutions.

    2. Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methanol and Ethanol for Hydrogen Generation (pages 927–940)

      Keith L. Hohn and Yu-Chuan Lin

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900104

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      Green hydrogen: Catalytic partial oxidation of biomethanol or bioethanol is an ideal process for hydrogen generation. Water and carbon dioxide produced from the fuel cells can be recycled through biomass growth, enabling a carbon-neutral cycle.

  6. Communications

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    1. One-Step Synthesis of 2-Alkyl-dioxolanes from Ethylene Glycol and Syngas (pages 941–943)

      Xiao-Bing Fan, Ning Yan, Zhi-Yuan Tao, David Evans, Chao-Xian Xiao and Yuan Kou

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900163

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      Life in the fast dioxolanes: the one-step synthesis of 2-alkyl-dioxolanes from ethylene glycol and syngas is achieved, using an iron nanoparticle catalyst. The process exhibits high activity and selectivity towards dioxolanes, which find use as oxygenate additives.

    2. Efficient Catalytic Conversion of Fructose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Ionic Liquids at Room Temperature (pages 944–946)

      Xinhua Qi, Masaru Watanabe, Taku M. Aida and Richard Lee Smith Jr

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900199

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      A green process for the efficient conversion of fructose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural at room temperature is described. High selectivities for 5-HMF at fructose conversions of ca. 95 % are obtained at 25 oC for 6 h in the ionic liquid [BMIM][Cl], through addition of acetone or other cosolvents.

    3. Immobilization of Lipases onto Magnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Application in Biodiesel Production (pages 947–950)

      Xia Wang, Peipei Dou, Peng Zhao, Chuanming Zhao, Yi Ding and Ping Xu

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900174

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      Stopping power: A simple immobilization procedure is developed to tether lipases onto amino-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The nanocomposites show radical improvements in their activity and stability in the production of biodiesel.

    4. Carbonates: Ecofriendly Solvents for Palladium-Catalyzed Direct 2-Arylation of Oxazole Derivatives (pages 951–956)

      Julien Roger, Cécile Verrier, Ronan Le Goff, Christophe Hoarau and Henri Doucet

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900148

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      Bien-bon-ates. Carbonates offer an environmentally friendly alternative to standard polar solvents. Since a few years, carbonates have been employed successfully for some classical metal-catalyzed reactions. Here, the palladium-catalyzed direct 2-arylation of oxazole derivatives in carbonate solvents is reported.

    5. Optimization of Oxygen Activation Fuel-Cell Electrocatalysts by Combinatorial Designs (pages 957–961)

      José M. Serra and Vicente B. Vert

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900149

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      Triple-A rating: The screening of electrode materials by a quaternary mixture experimental design based on the crystalline system (La, Pr, Sm, Ba)0.58Sr0.4Fe0.8Co0.2O3−δ allows the identification of highly active oxygen activation fuel-cell electrocatalysts. The combination of three different A-elements in the crystalline perovskite structure results in the occurrence of synergetic effects. The best element combinations show a low electrode polarization resistance and a low activation energy.

    6. Oxidative Desulfurization of Fuels with Task-Specific Ionic Liquids (pages 962–964)

      Elizeo Lissner, Wladmir F. de Souza, Bauer Ferrera and Jairton Dupont

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900171

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      Task-specific ionic liquids, containing a carboxylic group attached to an imidazolium cation and associated with a highly stable and hydrophobic anion, generate a fluid that proves to be a successful alternative medium for the oxidative desulfurization of petroleum-based fuels, when used with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidative agent.

    7. Recovery of Gold with Japanese Cedar Wood Powder (pages 965–967)

      Durga Parajuli and Koichi Hirota

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900141

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      The sorption capacity of Japanese cedar wood powder (CWP) for the recovery of AuIII is studied by varying its morphology and the experimental conditions. The results show that CWP is a stable, “green” sorbent with a high capacity and selectivity and allows recovery by a dual mechanism of sorption and continuous reduction. The reduction process forms hexagonal and triangular gold particles of 2–5 μm (see figure).

  7. Article

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    1. Ionic Liquids in Refinery Desulfurization: Comparison between Biphasic and Supported Ionic Liquid Phase Suspension Processes (pages 969–977)

      Esther Kuhlmann , Marco Haumann, Andreas Jess, Andreas Seeberger and Peter Wasserscheid

      Version of Record online: 1 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900142

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      The desulfurization of fuel compounds in the presence of ionic liquids is reported. When dispersing the ionic liquid as a thin film on highly porous silica, these supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) materials exhibit a significantly higher extraction performance due to the larger surface area. Extraction with SILP materials (see image) offers very efficient utilization of ionic liquids, circumvents mass transport limitations, and allows the application of simple packed-bed column extraction.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Article
    9. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 11/2009 (page 979)

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990040

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