ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 12

Special Issue: Chemistry of Renewables

December 21, 2009

Volume 2, Issue 12

Pages 1057–1167

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Acid Hydrolysis of Cellulose as the Entry Point into Biorefinery Schemes (ChemSusChem 12/2009) (page 1057)

      Roberto Rinaldi and Ferdi Schüth

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990045

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      The cover image shows a sustainable biorefinery scheme. Cellulose is a renewable and highly available feedstock that is typically found in wood, straw, grass, municipal solid waste, and crop residues. Its use, as raw material for biofuel production, opens a possibility for sustainable biorefinery schemes that do not compete with the food supply. Tapping into this feedstock for the production of biofuels and chemicals requires, as the first step, its depolymerization or its hydrolysis to intermediates more susceptible to chemical and/or biological transformations. Rinaldi and Schüth from the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung describe efficient methods for the conversion of cellulose in their Review found on page 1096.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
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      Editorial: Chemistry of Renewables (page 1059)

      Birgit Kamm and Claus H. Christensen

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900279

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 12/2009 (pages 1061–1065)

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990046

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
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    1. Myrcene as a Natural Base Chemical in Sustainable Chemistry: A Critical Review (pages 1072–1095)

      Arno Behr and Leif Johnen

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900186

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      Myrcene is an interesting natural hydrocarbon with a highly active diene structure that provides a chemistry similar to the unsaturated hydrocarbons already known from oil and gas. This Review is aimed at reviving this industrially available monoterpene as a renewable compound suitable for sustainable chemistry in the areas of vitamins, fragrances, flavors, insect repellents, and polymers.

    2. Acid Hydrolysis of Cellulose as the Entry Point into Biorefinery Schemes (pages 1096–1107)

      Roberto Rinaldi and Ferdi Schüth

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900188

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      How to lose cellulose: Hydrolysis of cellulose is experiencing a new research and development cycle, in which this reaction is carried out over solid catalysts and coupled to other reactions for its efficient utilization. This review covers 1) structural features of cellulose, 2) conventional acid-catalyzed processes, 3) mechanism of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, 4) reaction media, and 5) solid acid catalysts for the transformation of cellulose.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Acid Hydrolysis of Cellulose as the Entry Point into Biorefinery Schemes

      Vol. 3, Issue 3, 296, Article first published online: 16 MAR 2010

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
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    1. Transforming Triglycerides and Fatty Acids into Biofuels (pages 1109–1119)

      Siswati Lestari , Päivi Mäki-Arvela, Jorge Beltramini, G. Q. Max Lu and Dmitry Yu. Murzin

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900107

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      Fuels derived from biobased materials are attracting much attention. In this Minireview, we evaluate the transforming of biobased sources, particularly fatty acids and triglycerides, into fuels. Current technology such as transesterification, micro-emulsion, and cracking, known as the first generation, is covered. Recent novel technology based on deoxygenation reactions producing non-oxygenated biofuels is also discussed.

  7. Communication

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    4. Graphical Abstract
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    8. Communication
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    1. Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oils by Ketonization (pages 1121–1124)

      Christian A. Gärtner, Juan Carlos Serrano-Ruiz, Drew J. Braden and James A. Dumesic

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900178

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      Esterrific and ketonderful! Mixtures of acids and esters, produced by esterification reactions with alcohols in bio-oils, can be upgraded to larger ketones by ketonization reactions using a ceria–zirconia catalyst, on which acids adsorb more strongly than esters, leading to the preferential ketonization of acids followed by ketonization of esters at higher conversions.

  8. Articles

    1. Top of page
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    8. Communication
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    1. Telomerization of Butadiene with Starch under Mild Conditions (pages 1125–1129)

      Julien Mesnager, Claude Quettier, Anne Lambin, Franck Rataboul and Catherine Pinel

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900167

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      The synthesis of hydrophobic starch is performed under mild conditions through palladium-catalyzed telomerization of butadiene. In a H2O–dimethylisosorbide mixture at 50 °C and in the presence of Na2SO4, a granular texture of native starch is maintained and a turnover number of up to 550 is achieved.

    2. Photochemical Key Steps in the Synthesis of Surfactants from Furfural-Derived Intermediates (pages 1130–1137)

      Abdoulaye Gassama, Cédric Ernenwein and Norbert Hoffmann

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900150

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      Furfural obtained from biomass is a versatile platform chemical. It is easily transformed into furanones by using sustainable oxidation methods. Amphoteric surfactants are produced from these intermediates by photochemically induced radical addition of fatty amine-derived products.

    3. Biomass into Chemicals: Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural into 2,5-Furandicarboxylic Acid with Gold Nanoparticle Catalysts (pages 1138–1144)

      Onofre Casanova, Sara Iborra and Avelino Corma

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900137

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      Cerious chemistry: 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural is selectively converted into 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid in water, using air as oxidant, under mild conditions, and with gold nanoparticles supported on nanoparticulate ceria (Au-CeO2) as catalyst. The catalyst is stable and reusable. Substrate degradation is strongly diminished and catalyst life is increased by performing the reaction in two temperature steps. The catalytic performance of Au-CeO2 surpasses that of other gold nanoparticle catalysts (e.g., Au-TiO2, Au-Fe2O3).

    4. Oxidation of Glycerol to Glycolate by using Supported Gold and Palladium Nanoparticles (pages 1145–1151)

      Meenakshisundaram Sankar, Nikolaos Dimitratos, David W. Knight, Albert F. Carley, Ramchandra Tiruvalam, Christopher J. Kiely, Damian Thomas and Graham J. Hutchings

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900133

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      The use of glycerol as a biorenewable chemical feedstock is of immense importance, because it is a byproduct of the manufacture of biodiesel. Catalysts (1 wt % Au/carbon) are prepared by using a sol-immobilization method, and are shown to oxidize glycerol to glycolate giving yields of ca. 60 %, using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant in an autoclave reactor.

    5. C Factors Pinpoint Resource Utilization in Chemical Industrial Processes (pages 1152–1162)

      Bodil Voss, Simon Ivar Andersen, Esben Taarning and Claus Hviid Christensen

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900215

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      The C factor is suggested as a metric for fast evaluation of the CO2 burden of chemical processes. The C factor contains information of the total amount of CO2 emitted in order to produce a product, and thus enables a direct comparison of the CO2 aspect of different processes. We illustrate how this simple concept can be used to evaluate different resource types and processes.

  9. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. Introduction to Chemicals from Biomass. Edited by James H. Clark and Fabien E. I. Deswarte (page 1163)

      Birgit Kamm

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900240

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      John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, 2008. 198 pp., hardcover US$ 90.00—ISBN 978-0-470-05805-3

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Articles
    10. Book Review
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 1/2010 (page 1167)

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990048

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