ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 2

February 23, 2009

Volume 2, Issue 2

Pages 117–191

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Stable Hybrid Silica Nanosieve Membranes for the Dehydration of Lower Alcohols (ChemSusChem 2/2009) (page 117)

      Robert Kreiter, Mariëlle D. A. Rietkerk, Hessel L. Castricum, Henk M. van Veen, Johan E. ten Elshof and Jaap F. Vente

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990004

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      The cover picture shows the membrane separation of water (blue arrow) from crude ethanol (red arrows) as a key enabling technology in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. This technology is generally considered to be one of the more viable options for the transition to a sustainable transportation fuel supply. In their Communication on page 158, J. F. Vente and co-workers describe the preparation and performance of an amorphous bridged silsesquioxane-based membrane characterized by Si–CH2–Si building units. This new organic–inorganic hybrid silica membrane allows the dehydration of ethanol and, to some extent, methanol. Even the presence of 1.5 wt % acetic acid does not affect the separation performance of these membranes.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 2/2009 (pages 119–122)

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990005

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 2/2009 (pages 124–125)

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990006

  4. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Direct, High-Yield Conversions of Cellulose into Biofuel and Platform Chemicals—On the Way to a Sustainable Biobased Economy (pages 127–128)

      Mark Rüsch gen. Klaas and Heralt Schöne

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800186

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      Steering away from alcohol: Fermentation of carbohydrates to ethanol might not be the best way to utilize biomass for the production of fuels and platform chemicals. Two different new remarkable approaches lead to polyols or furfural derivatives.

  5. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Environmentally Benign Production of Biodiesel Using Heterogeneous Catalysts (pages 129–135)

      Michikazu Hara 

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800222

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      Fuelling the future: The production of esters of higher fatty acids from plant materials is of great interest for the manufacture of biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalysts can provide new routes for the environmentally benign production of biodiesel. Particulate heterogeneous catalysts can be readily separated from products following reaction allowing the catalyst to be reused, generating less waste, and consuming less energy.

    2. Novel Polymeric Materials from Vegetable Oils and Vinyl Monomers: Preparation, Properties, and Applications (pages 136–147)

      Yongshang Lu and Richard C. Larock

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800241

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      Veggie-based products: Vegetable-oil-based polymeric materials, prepared by free radical, cationic, and olefin metathesis polymerizations, range from soft rubbers to ductile or rigid plastics, and to high-performance biocomposites and nanocomposites. They display a wide range of thermophysical and mechanical properties and may find promising applications as alternatives to petroleum-based polymers.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
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    1. Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails (pages 149–152)

      Xinhao Ye, Yiran Wang, Robert C. Hopkins, Michael W. W. Adams, Barbara R. Evans, Jonathan R. Mielenz and Y.-H. Percival Zhang

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900017

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      Cocktail reception: Biohydrogen is produced in high yield from cellulosic materials and water in a one-pot process catalyzed by up to 14 enzymes and one coenzyme. This assembly of enzymes results in non-natural catabolic pathways. These spontaneous reactions are conducted under modest reaction conditions (32 °C and atmospheric pressure).

    2. Palladium-Catalysed Direct 3- or 4-Arylation of 2,5-Disubstituted Pyrrole Derivatives: An Economically and Environmentally Attractive Procedure (pages 153–157)

      Yacoub Fall, Henri Doucet and Maurice Santelli

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800248

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      Straight to the point: The direct 3- or 4-arylation of pyrrole derivatives through C[BOND]H bond activation proceeds in moderate to good yields using Pd(OAc)2 as catalyst. In contrast to classical coupling procedures, the preparation of an organometallic derivative is not required and the major by-products are AcOH/KBr instead of metallic salts.

    3. Stable Hybrid Silica Nanosieve Membranes for the Dehydration of Lower Alcohols (pages 158–160)

      Robert Kreiter, Mariëlle D. A. Rietkerk, Hessel L. Castricum, Henk M. van Veen, Johan E. ten Elshof and Jaap F. Vente

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A thirst for water: Organic–inorganic hybrid silica nanosieve membranes with narrow pore size distributions were developed for the separation of binary (bio)alcohol/water mixtures, for example, to remove water from wet biofuels during production. These membranes dehydrate lower alcohols and show a stable performance in the presence of significant amounts of acetic acid.

    4. Formation of Cross-Linked Chloroperoxidase Aggregates in the Pores of Mesocellular Foams: Characterization by SANS and Catalytic Properties (pages 161–164)

      Dirk Jung, Michelangelo Paradiso, Dirk Wallacher, Astrid Brandt and Martin Hartmann

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800245

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      No escape: The formation of cross-linked chloroperoxidase aggregates (CPO-CLEAs) in the pores of mesocellular foam materials results in active biocatalysts that are more resistant to leaching than the conventional catalyst prepared by physisorption of chloroperoxidase. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments clearly confirm that the CPO-CLEAs are located in the pores of the mesocellular foams.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Synthesis of Cellulose Fatty Esters as Plastics—Influence of the Degree of Substitution and the Fatty Chain Length on Mechanical Properties (pages 165–170)

      Lucie Crépy, Ludovic Chaveriat, Joseph Banoub, Patrick Martin and Nicolas Joly

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800171

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      Alternative films: The effect of the chain length and the degree of substitution on the mechanical and hydrophobic properties of various cellulose fatty ester plastic films was studied. The results suggest that the cellulose ester plastic films are promising alternatives to petrochemical commodity plastics such as polyethylene.

    2. Anode Catalysts for Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells Utilizing Directly Solar Light Illumination (pages 171–176)

      Daobao Chu, Shuxi Wang, Peng Zheng, Jian Wang, Longwu Zha, Yuanyuan Hou, Jianguo He, Ying Xiao, Huashui Lin and Zhaowu Tian

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800158

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      Shine a light: A PtNiRu/TiO2 anode catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells shows photocatalytic activity. The peak current density for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination is 2–3 times greater than that in the absence of solar light. Ethanol is oxidized by light-generated holes, and the electrons are collected by the TiO2 support to generate the oxidation current.

    3. Zn1.2H0.6PW12O40 Nanotubes with Double Acid Sites as Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Production of Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil (pages 177–183)

      Jing Li, Xiaohong Wang, Weimin Zhu and Fenghua Cao

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800208

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Out of the frying pan: A ZnPW nanotube catalyst containing Brønsted and Lewis double acid sites promotes the conversion of waste cooking oil into biodiesel. The catalytic activity of the ZnPW nanotubes is stable to the presence of free fatty acids or water in the feedstock. The high catalytic activity of the ZnPW nanotubes is attributed to the synergistic effect of Lewis acid sites and Brønsted acid sites.

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Supramolecular Catalysis.Edited by Piet W. N. M. van Leewen (pages 186–187)

      Stefan Füldner and Burkhard König

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800231

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  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireviews
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 3/2009 (page 191)

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990007

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