ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 3

March 23, 2009

Volume 2, Issue 3

Pages 193–263

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Copolymerization of Divinylsilyl-11-silicotungstic Acid with Butyl Acrylate and Hexanediol Diacrylate: Synthesis of a Highly Proton-Conductive Membrane for Fuel-Cell Applications (ChemSusChem 3/2009) (page 193)

      James L. Horan, Anitha Genupur, Hui Ren, Benjamin J. Sikora, Mei-Chen Kuo, Fanqin Meng, Steven F. Dec, Gregory M. Haugen, Michael A. Yandrasits, Steven J. Hamrock, Matthew H. Frey and Andrew M. Herring

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the structure of the hybrid inorganic–organic polymer polydivinylsilyl-11-silicotungstic acid-co-butyl acrylate (picture courtesy of Mark T. Lusk, Colorado School of Mines). In their Communication on page 226, A. M. Herring and co-workers describe the preparation and characterization of this material for the first time as a free-standing, acidified film, suitable for a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell. The material phase separates into clusters that exhibit superior proton transport to that observed in standard perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) materials at 100% relative humidity. The materials require less water for proton transport than PFSA materials, pointing to the future potential of these materials for proton conduction under hotter and drier conditions than can currently be used with PFSA ionomers.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 3/2009 (pages 195–198)

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990009

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      From Biomass to a Renewable LiXC6O6 Organic Electrode for Sustainable Li-Ion Batteries (page 198)

      Haiyan Chen, Michel Armand, Gilles Demailly, Franck Dolhem, Philippe Poizot and Jean-Marie Tarascon

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990010

      This article corrects:

      From Biomass to a Renewable LiXC6O6 Organic Electrode for Sustainable Li-Ion Batteries

      Vol. 1, Issue 4, 348–355, Article first published online: 2 APR 2008

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 3/2009 (pages 202–203)

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990011

  5. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Low-Valent Indium as a Catalyst for the Allylation of Ketones and N-Acylhydrazones (pages 205–206)

      Woo-Jin Yoo and Chao-Jun Li

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800243

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Indium summer: The use of low-valent indium species in organic chemistry was, until quite recently, underdeveloped. Then came reports of indium(I) halides serving as excellent catalysts for the allylation of ketones and N-acylhydrazones with pinacol allylboronates, and more recently of indium(0) being used as a catalyst for the allylation of ketones in water.

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Catalytic Transformation of Waste Polymers to Fuel Oil (pages 207–214)

      Mark A. Keane

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Waste not, want not: The increase in waste polymer generation, which continues to exceed recycle, represents a critical environmental burden. However, plastic waste may be viewed as a potential resource and, with the correct treatment, can serve as hydrocarbon raw material or as fuel oil, as described in this Minireview.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
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    1. Hydrogen Transfer from Supercritical Methanol over a Solid Base Catalyst: A Model for Lignin Depolymerization (pages 215–217)

      Gerald S. Macala, Theodore D. Matson, Charles L. Johnson, Robert S. Lewis, Alexei V. Iretskii and Peter C. Ford

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A (super)critical transfer: The consecutive hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation of the lignin model compound dihydrobenzofuran was studied in supercritical methanolic solutions using porous metal oxide catalysts. These catalysts promote H2 production from methanol followed by hydrogenolysis of the ether linkages and reduction of the aromatic rings, leading principally to a mixture of cyclohexanols.

    2. Electrophilic Activation of Aldehydes “On Water”: A Facile Route to Dipyrromethanes (pages 218–220)

      Luca Zoli and Pier Giorgio Cozzi

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shaken … and stirred: Dipyrromethane, an important building block in porphyrin chemistry, can be easily accessed by a reaction performed on water in the absence of Lewis acids. Thus, a variety of substituted dipyrromethanes were prepared in moderate to good yields using a range of aldehydes.

    3. The Stability of Platinum–Carbon Aerogel Catalysts upon Repeated Potential Cycles (pages 221–225)

      Hyun Joong Kim, Hyung-Sang Park and Dong Jin Suh

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800224

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A sense of stability: The stability of carbon-supported platinum catalysts at high potentials is important for the commercialization of fuel cells for homes and cars. The electrochemical active surface (EAS) area of a Pt–C aerogel catalyst was found to increase up to 500 cycles, in contrast to that for the so-called Tanaka catalyst which decreases with the number of repeated potential cycles.

    4. Copolymerization of Divinylsilyl-11-silicotungstic Acid with Butyl Acrylate and Hexanediol Diacrylate: Synthesis of a Highly Proton-Conductive Membrane for Fuel-Cell Applications (pages 226–229)

      James L. Horan, Anitha Genupur, Hui Ren, Benjamin J. Sikora, Mei-Chen Kuo, Fanqin Meng, Steven F. Dec, Gregory M. Haugen, Michael A. Yandrasits, Steven J. Hamrock, Matthew H. Frey and Andrew M. Herring

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800237

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly conducive to high conductivity: Polyoxometalates were incorporated in the backbone of a hydrocarbon polymer to produce proton-conducting films. These first-generation materials contain large, dispersed clusters of polyoxometalates. Although the morphology of these films is not yet optimal, they already demonstrate practical proton conductivities and proton diffusion within the clusters appears to be very high.

    5. The Potential of Supported Cu2O and CuO Nanosystems in Photocatalytic H2 Production (pages 230–233)

      Davide Barreca, Paolo Fornasiero, Alberto Gasparotto, Valentina Gombac, Chiara Maccato, Tiziano Montini and Eugenio Tondello

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hy wire: Supported Cu2O nanosystems and CuO nanowires obtained by chemical vapor deposition were used in the photocatalytic splitting of methanol/water solutions to produce hydrogen. The results obtained with these systems open appealing perspectives for the clean conversion of sunlight into storable chemical energy.

    6. Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid Promoted by a Diamine-Functionalized Ionic Liquid (pages 234–238)

      Zhaofu Zhang, Suqin Hu, Jinliang Song, Wenjing Li, Guanying Yang and Buxing Han

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800252

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amines to an end: The basic diamine-functionalized ionic liquid 1,3-di(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)-2-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared and used in the hydrogenation of CO2 to formic acid. One mole of the ionic liquid coordinates two moles of formic acid to promote the reaction. Both the ionic liquid and catalyst can be reused directly after their separation from the formic acid produced.

  8. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Biosurfactants from Urban Green Waste (pages 239–247)

      Enzo Montoneri, Vittorio Boffa, Piero Savarino, Daniele G. Perrone, Giorgia Musso, Raniero Mendichi, Michele R. Chierotti and Roberto Gobetto

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800199

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From waste came forth surfactants: Humic acid like substances isolated from 0–60 day-old compost display excellent surface activity and solvent properties. These biosurfactants were used to solubilize a dye in water below and above their critical micellar concentration. The biosurfactant unimers appear to have higher dye-solubilizing power than the corresponding micelles.

    2. Kneading Ball-Milling and Stoichiometric Melts for the Quantitative Derivatization of Carbonyl Compounds with Gas–Solid Recovery (pages 248–254)

      Javad Mokhtari, Mohammad R. Naimi-Jamal, Hamideh Hamzeali, Mohammad G. Dekamin and Gerd Kaupp

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800258

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A ray of hope for the environment is sustainable and green synthesis without the production of (toxic) waste. Solvent-free stoichiometric melting or kneading ball-milling reactions of aldehydes or ketones with carbonyl reagents yields arylhydrazones and oximes in quantitative yield. The carbonyl compounds can be quantitatively recovered from the imino derivatives by using gaseous NO2.

    3. Selective Capture of Water Using Microporous Adsorbents To Increase the Lifetime of Lubricants (pages 255–260)

      Eng-Poh Ng, Luc Delmotte and Svetlana Mintova

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800234

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Long live lubricants: The selective capture of water from lubricants using nanosized microporous aluminophosphate (AEI) and aluminosilicate materials was studied. Nearly 98% of the moisture was removed from the lubricating oil under ambient conditions, resulting in a significant improvement in the lubricating service lifetime. Moreover, both the lubricant and the microporous sorbents can be recovered and reused.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 4/2009 (page 263)

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990012

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