ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 7

July 20, 2009

Volume 2, Issue 7

Pages 597–679

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Theoretical Screening of Ionic Liquid Solvents for Carbon Capture (ChemSusChem 7/2009) (page 597)

      Amitesh Maiti

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the molecular modeling of CO2 capture by an ionic liquid membrane. A typical fossil-fuel plant (top left) produces significant CO2 emissions and emissions of other greenhouse gases. A membrane based on ionic liquids may absorb such emissions. The chemical structure of the constituting cation–anion pair is also shown. In a Communication on p. 628, A. Maiti describes how a quantum-chemistry-based solvation model is used to design and screen candidates for high-efficiency capture.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 7/2009 (pages 599–602)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990026

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 7/2009 (pages 604–605)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990027

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Permanent Wood Sequestration: No Solution to the Global Carbon Dioxide Problem (pages 609–613)

      Michael Köhl and Arno Frühwald

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800240

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      An earlier suggestion to solve the global carbon dioxide problem by Scholz and Hasse is subject to restrictions when transferred into operational applications and to an order of magnitude that would be needed to display a significant reduction of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. This contribution presents an alternative point of view on the utilization of timber as a means for solving the global carbon dioxide problem, and expands on the wood growth and burial process.

    2. Reply to Comments on “Permanent Wood Sequestration: The Solution to the Global Carbon Dioxide Problem” (pages 614–615)

      Fritz Scholz and Ulrich Hasse

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900095

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      The wood growth and burial process is, from an economical and ecological point of view, the only solution that we can think of at the moment. The arguments that doubt that this proposal can effectively diminish the increase of global CO2 concentrations, as put forward by Köhl and Frühwald, are not convincing.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. A Glycerol-based Carbon Catalyst for the Preparation of Biodiesel (pages 617–620)

      Bethala L. A. Prabhavathi Devi, Katkam N. Gangadhar, Potharaju S. Sai Prasad, Bulusu Jagannadh and Rachapudi B. N. Prasad

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900097

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      A carbon catalyst obtained from glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel processing, with a high density of sulfonic acid groups is prepared by carbonization and sulfurization (see figure). The carbon catalyst, with very good water tolerance and reusability, is useful for the preparation of biodiesel from fatty acids or from fatty acids present in vegetable oils and animal fats.

    2. Panchromatic Cross-Substituted Squaraines for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications (pages 621–624)

      Luca Beverina, Riccardo Ruffo, Claudio Maria Mari, Giorgio A. Pagani, Mauro Sassi, Filippo De Angelis, Simona Fantacci, Jun-Ho Yum, Michael Grätzel and Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900077

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      Forward from square one: The incorporation of a molecularly engineered original panchromatic squaraine sensitizer in a dye-sensitized solar cell enables the preparation of devices having external quantum efficiencies as high as 4.71 %; an unprecedented result for this class of compounds.

    3. Zeolite-Catalyzed Isomerization of Triose Sugars (pages 625–627)

      Esben Taarning, Shunmugavel Saravanamurugan, Martin Spangsberg Holm, Jianmin Xiong, Ryan M. West and Claus Hviid Christensen

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900099

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      Zeozymes: Sn-Beta zeolite is found to be a highly active catalyst for the conversion of triose sugars. If the solvent is water, isomerization of the triose sugars takes place to form lactic acid in 90 % yield at 125 °C. If methanol is used as the solvent, an overall isomerization–esterification reaction takes place and methyl lactate is formed in quantitative yields at 80 °C. This represents one of the most selective zeolite-catalyzed biomass transformation reactions.

    4. Theoretical Screening of Ionic Liquid Solvents for Carbon Capture (pages 628–631)

      Amitesh Maiti

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900086

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A computational approach that accurately computes CO2solubilities in ionic liquid solvents is described. A large number of solvents are screened for efficient dissolution of CO2. The approach yields an excellent agreement (within 10–15 %) with recent solubility measurements over a range of temperatures and gas pressures of practical interest.

  6. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Sustainable Management of the Global Carbon Cycle Through Geostorage of Wood (pages 633–644)

      Gerhard Kreysa

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900102

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      Carbon tree-ties: Combustion of fossil energy sources has caused the carbon inventory of the atmosphere to increase, and it will continue to increase. Natural photosynthesis can efficiently fixate carbon dioxide from air. Subsequent geostorage of the resulting biomass in an oxidation-proof environment would remove the carbon from the carbon cycle.

    2. Discovery of 2-Naphthoic Acid Monooxygenases by Genome Mining and their Use as Biocatalysts (pages 645–649)

      Toshiki Furuya and Kuniki Kino

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900054

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oxidation biocatalysts discovered by genome mining allow the direct synthesis of hydroxy-2-naphthoic acids from 2-naphthoic acid and molecular oxygen. One of the products, 8-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, which is difficult to synthesize by chemical methods, emits near-white fluorescence (see figure).

    3. Homogeneous versus Supported ONN Pincer-Type Gold and Palladium Complexes: Catalytic Activity (pages 650–657)

      Carolina del Pozo , Nathalie Debono , Avelino Corma, Marta Iglesias and Félix Sánchez

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900045

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      Palladium and gold complexes with ONN-tridentate unsymmetrical pincer ligands are immobilized onto ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and are shown to be very active catalysts, especially in the hydrogenation of prochiral olefins. The repeated use demonstrates “homogeneous” catalysis with “heterogeneous” catalysts; reducing solvent waste and avoiding the loss of precious metals and/or ligands.

    4. Carbon-Supported, Selenium-Modified Ruthenium–Molybdenum Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media (pages 658–664)

      Maxime J.-F. Guinel, Arman Bonakdarpour, Biao Wang, Panakkattu K. Babu, Frank Ernst, Nagappan Ramaswamy, Sanjeev Mukerjee and Andrzej Wieckowski

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800215

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      The effect of molybdenum on the activity and stability of selenium-modified ruthenium in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated. The catalyst is dispersed onto an amorphous carbon support and characterized by a range of analytical techniques. The results indicate that the addition of Mo in Ru chalcogenide materials for ORR electrocatalysis is promising.

    5. Acid-Catalyzed Conversion of Sugars and Furfurals in an Ionic-Liquid Phase (pages 665–671)

      Carsten Sievers, Ildar Musin, Teresita Marzialetti, Mariefel B. Valenzuela Olarte, Pradeep K. Agrawal and Christopher W. Jones

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900092

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      The reactivity of monosaccharides, furfural, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF) in an ionic liquid is in the presence of a Brønsted acid is investigated. Fructose is converted at a fast rate and yields HMF with high selectivity. Furfural and HMF are only converted to a major extent when monosaccharides and their degradation products are present. The acid-catalyzed degradation reactions also lead to the formation of solid residues.

    6. Gold-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water at Ambient Temperature (pages 672–675)

      Yury Y. Gorbanev, Søren K. Klitgaard, John M. Woodley, Claus H. Christensen and Anders Riisager

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The biomass-derived chemical 5-hydroxymethylfurfural is readily oxidized with oxygen over a titania-supported gold nanoparticle catalyst in aqueous solution in the presence of base to afford 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid, a potential monomer building block for the plastics industry.

  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Trace Elements as Contaminants and Nutrients: Consequences in Ecosystems and Human Health.Edited by M. N. V. Prasad (page 677)

      Markus Puschenreiter

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900050

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      Wiley, 2008. 778 pp., hardcover, US$ 175.00—ISBN 978-0-470-18095-2

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Correspondence
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Book Review
    9. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 8/2009 (page 679)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200990028

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