ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 12

December 17, 2010

Volume 3, Issue 12

Pages 1317–1413

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
    9. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Microporous Membranes with High Hydrothermal Stability for the Separation of Carbon Dioxide (ChemSusChem 12/2010) (page 1317)

      Dr. Hong Qi, Jing Han, Prof. Nanping Xu and Dr. Henny J. M. Bouwmeester

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090047

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      The cover picture shows the use of an asymmetric hybrid organic–inorganic membrane in a zero-emission power plant based on the pre-combustion CO2 capture scheme. In their communication on page 1375, H. Qi, H. J. M. Bouwmeester and co-workers describe the preparation and extraordinary performance of a sol–gel- derived microporous ethylene-bridged silsesquioxane membrane onto a multilayer support for enhanced CO2 separation. The membrane combines superior hydrothermal stability with excellent permselectivities.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
    9. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 12/2010 (pages 1319–1323)

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090048

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
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    1. Sustainability in the News: Polymers, Lamps, and Heat Storage! (pages 1330–1331)

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000395

      Sustainability in the News: Polymers, Lamps, and Heat Storage!

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
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    1. Nanosizing and Nanoconfinement: New Strategies Towards Meeting Hydrogen Storage Goals (pages 1332–1348)

      Dr. Petra E. de Jongh and Dr. Philipp Adelhelm

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000248

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      Light metal hydrides are an important option for compact, safe, and efficient on-board hydrogen storage. However, slow kinetics, poor reversibility, and low equilibrium pressures hamper their practical application. We review the impact of nanosizing and -confinement; recent strategies with a large impact on the hydrogen sorption properties of relevant light metal hydrides.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
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    1. Comment on Processes for the Direct Conversion of Cellulose or Cellulosic Biomass into Levulinate Esters (pages 1349–1351)

      Prof. Mark Mascal and Dr. Edward B. Nikitin

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000326

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      Reported conversions of cellulose and cellulosic biomass directly into ethyl levulinate by acid-catalyzed thermolysis in ethanol are critically examined. Modest product yields, an ethanol to ether side reaction, and catalyst recyclability issues limit the applied scope of this process.

    2. Synthesis of Carbon-based Solid Acid Microspheres and Their Application to the Production of Biodiesel (pages 1352–1354)

      Dr. Juan A. Maciá-Agulló, Dr. Marta Sevilla, Dr. Maria A. Diez and Prof. Antonio B. Fuertes

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000308

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      Nonporous carbon microspheres functionalized with sulfonic groups are produced from glucose, a renewable and abundant material. The solid acid exhibits a remarkably high catalytic performance in the production of fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel).

    3. Rapid Ablative Pyrolysis of Cellulose in an Autothermal Fixed-Bed Catalytic Reactor (pages 1355–1358)

      Christine M. Balonek, Dr. Joshua L. Colby, Nils E. Persson and Prof. Lanny D. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000257

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      A fixed-bed platinum or rhodium–cerium catalytic reactor is shown to effect a high carbon selectivity to pyrolysis oil from cellulosic feedstock. Heat is generated in situ by the sacrificial oxidation of pyrolysis vapors. High heat transfer rates within the catalyst bed allow for 100 % conversion of the cellulose feed while maintaining char-free and autothermal operation. Variations in support geometry, catalyst, and H2 addition are investigated to manipulate the yield of pyrolysis products.

    4. One-Phase Ionic Liquid Reaction Medium for Biocatalytic Production of Biodiesel (pages 1359–1363)

      Prof. Pedro Lozano, Juana María Bernal, Dr. Rungtiwa Piamtongkam, Dirk Fetzer and Dr. Michel Vaultier

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000244

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      A highly efficient biocatalytic process for biodiesel synthesis in 1-methyl-3-octadecylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide is shown. This ionic liquid (IL) is able to dissolve triolein/methanol mixtures in many proportions, providing an homogeneous monophasic media suitable for the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel (up to 96 % yield in 6 h at 60 °C). The enzyme/IL system can be reused for seven operation cycles without any loss in IL phase or enzyme activity.

    5. Hydrogen Production from Bioethanol: Oxidative Steam Reforming of Aqueous Ethanol Triggered by Oxidation of Ni/Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−x at Low Temperature (pages 1364–1366)

      Dr. Katsutoshi Sato, Kosuke Kawano, Akiko Ito, Prof. Yusaku Takita and Dr. Katsutoshi Nagaoka

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000221

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      A-steam: Oxidative steam reforming of ethanol aqueous solution is triggered at low temperature (373 K) repeatedly over Ni/Ce0.5Zr0.5O2. Here, the ethanol/steam ratio mimicks the bioethanol solution.

    6. Differentiation of Bulk and Surface Contribution to Supercapacitance in Amorphous and Crystalline NiO (pages 1367–1370)

      Qi Lu, Zachary J. Mellinger, Dr. Weigang Wang, Dr. Wanfeng Li, Yunpeng Chen, Prof. Jingguang G. Chen and Prof. John Q. Xiao

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000270

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      The Incredible Bulk: We investigate and quantify the different contributions in both amorphous and crystalline electrode materials. The results provide a scientific basis for future NiO electrode design. The conclusions and the characterization techniques can also be helpful in understanding other candidate materials for pseudocapacitors.

    7. A Cross-Linked Soft Matter Polymer Electrolyte for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 1371–1374)

      Monalisa Patel, Manu U. M. Patel and Dr. Aninda Jiban Bhattacharyya

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000249

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      Ion man: A soft matter cross-linked polymer electrolyte with superior mechanical, thermal, and electrochemical properties is synthesized by using a new methodology for application in lithium-ion batteries.

    8. Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Microporous Membranes with High Hydrothermal Stability for the Separation of Carbon Dioxide (pages 1375–1378)

      Dr. Hong Qi, Jing Han, Prof. Nanping Xu and Dr. Henny J. M. Bouwmeester

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000242

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      Membranes only: A hybrid organic–inorganic membrane for CO2 separation is prepared by sol–gel deposition of a microporous ethylene-bridged silsesquioxane layer onto a multilayer support. Low CO2 permeance is imparted by doping acidic niobium centers into the hybrid silica network. The membrane exhibits superior hydrothermal stability with He/CO2 selectivities as high as 3700.

    9. Available hydrogen from formic acid decomposed by rare earth elements promoted Pd-Au/C catalysts at low temperature (pages 1379–1382)

      Dr. Xiaochun Zhou, Dr. Yunjie Huang, Prof. Changpeng Liu, Prof. Jianhui Liao, Prof. Tianhong Lu and Prof. Wei Xing

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000199

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      Raring to go: Rare earth elements (REs) are very effective in promoting Pd–Au/C catalysts. High-quality hydrogen is evolved from the catalyzed decomposition of formic acid by Pd–Au–REs/C (REs=Dy, Eu, and Ho) catalysts at low temperature. High performance of fuel cell was achieved by using this hydrogen.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
    9. Preview
    1. Catalytic Oxidative Dehydration of Glycerol over a Catalyst with Iron Oxide Domains Embedded in an Iron Orthovanadate Phase (pages 1383–1389)

      Prof. Feng Wang, Prof. Jie Xu, Dr. Jean-Luc Dubois and Prof. Wataru Ueda

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000245

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      The rapid growth of the biodiesel industry has lead to the production of large amounts of glycerol, as the compound is a major byproduct of biodiesel production. A catalyst with nanometer-sized FeOx domains embedded in the surface of FeVO4 phase is active for the oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrolein and acrylic acid, turning the byproduct into valuable chemicals.

    2. Enhanced Ionic Conductivity in Planar Sodium-β”-Alumina Electrolyte for Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications (pages 1390–1397)

      Dr. Daniela La Rosa, Giuseppe Monforte, Dr. Claudia D'Urso, Dr. Vincenzo Baglio, Dr. Vincenzo Antonucci and Dr. Antonino S. Aricò

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000223

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      A high-density, planar Na-β”-Al2O3solid electrolyte is prepared by a simple chemical route at temperatures lower than the state-of-the-art, from a nanometer-sized boehmite precursor. The ionic conductivity of the electrolyte is about double that of a commercial sodium-β”-alumina tube in the temperature range of interest for electrochemical energy storage devices.

    3. Characterization of Anion Exchange Ionomers in Hybrid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (pages 1398–1402)

      Dr. Murat Ünlü, Dr. Junfeng Zhou, Irene Anestis-Richard and Prof. Paul A. Kohl

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000239

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      Synthesized anion-conducting polymers were readily characterized on a hybrid polymer electrolyte fuel cell with acidic anode/membrane and alkaline cathode. The novel design enables to extract the contribution of the alkaline electrode in electrochemical impedance spectra. The effects of the physical properties of ionomers on the cell performances are identified.

    4. Reusable Task-Specific Ionic Liquids for a Clean ε-Caprolactam Synthesis under Mild Conditions (pages 1403–1408)

      Dr. Raphaël Turgis, Dr. Julien Estager, Prof. Micheline Draye, Prof. Vittorio Ragaini, Dr. Werner Bonrath and Dr. Jean-Marc Lévêque

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000203

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      Cyclohexane oxime selectively affords ε-caprolactam via a Beckmann rearrangement when using the Brønsted acidic ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-(butyl-4-sulfonyl)imidazolium hydrogenosulfate [BMIMSO3H,HSO4]. The reaction is completed in 4 h under mechanical stirring, and the recovered ionic liquid can be recycled several times without any loss of catalytic activity.

  7. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
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    1. Recent Progress in Catalysis and Photochemistry for Energy Technologies (pages 1409–1410)

      Dr. Sebastian Losse and Dr. Henrik Junge

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000321

      Recent Progress in Catalysis and Photochemistry for Energy Technologies

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Conference Report
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      Preview: ChemSusChem 1/2011 (page 1413)

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090050

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