ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 10

October 25, 2010

Volume 3, Issue 10

Pages 1089–1207

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Next-Generation Biofuels: Survey of Emerging Technologies and Sustainability Issues (ChemSusChem 10/2010) (page 1089)

      Dr. Sergey Zinoviev, Franziska Müller-Langer, Piyali Das , Dr. Nicolás Bertero , Prof. Paolo Fornasiero , Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt , Prof. Gabriele Centi  and Prof. Stanislav Miertus

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture is from the Review by Stanislav Miertus et al., who describe on p. 1106 how next-generation biofuels, such as cellulosic bioethanol, biomethane from waste, synthetic biofuels obtained via gasification of biomass, biohydrogen, and others are currently in the centre of attention of technologists and policy makers in search of a more sustainable biofuel of tomorrow. In order to set realistic targets for the future biofuel options, it is important to assess their sustainability according to technical, economic, and environmental points of view. Opportunities and limits are discussed in terms of technical applicability of existing and emerging technology options to bio-waste feedstock, and further development forecasts are made based on the existing social-economic and market situation, feedstock potentials, and other global aspects.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Developments in Energy Research (pages 1102–1103)

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000332

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Next-Generation Biofuels: Survey of Emerging Technologies and Sustainability Issues (pages 1106–1133)

      Dr. Sergey Zinoviev, Franziska Müller-Langer, Piyali Das , Dr. Nicolás Bertero , Prof. Paolo Fornasiero , Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt , Prof. Gabriele Centi  and Prof. Stanislav Miertus

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An overview of technical aspects of production technologies for next-generation biofuel is presented. Complemented with their related economical and environmental assessment results, an insight into the sustainability of the technologies, and an analysis of the opportunities and limits of future development, is given.

  5. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Green Oxidation of Alcohols to Carbonyl Compounds by Heterogeneous Photocatalysis (pages 1135–1138)

      Prof. Vincenzo Augugliaro and Prof. Leonardo Palmisano

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Brøn to be mild: The use of heterogeneous photocatalysis for carrying out the partial oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds is discussed. This environmentally benign catalytic process is able to perform aerobic transformations of alcohols in water. A recent discovery indicates that the photo-oxidation of alcohols on TiO2 or SiO2/TiO2 samples is strongly accelerated, without loss of selectivity, via surface loading of Brønsted acids.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Efficient Route to Hydroxymethylfurans from Sugars via Transfer Hydrogenation (pages 1139–1141)

      Dr. Todsapon Thananatthanachon and Prof. Thomas B. Rauchfuss

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tandem catalysis, relying on formic acid as an acid catalyst and as a source of hydrogen, provides a promising route to highly pure furanylmethanols. The new approach exploits (i) the use of DMSO to mediate highly efficient routes to furfurals and (ii) the ability of transfer hydrogenation catalysts to effect the hydrogenation, with good tolerance for DMSO.

    2. Liberation of Cellulose from the Lignin Cage: A Catalytic Pretreatment Method for the Production of Cellulosic Ethanol (pages 1142–1145)

      Maija Hakola, Anne Kallioinen, Dr. Marianna Kemell, Dr. Petro Lahtinen, Elina Lankinen, Prof. Markku Leskelä, Dr. Timo Repo, Tiina Riekkola, Matti Siika-aho, Jaana Uusitalo, Dr. Satu Vuorela and Dr. Niklas von Weymarn

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000217

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials with a copper(II) phenanthroline catalyst is an efficient and selective method for the isolation of cellulose. The method loosens the wood matrix and liberates cellulose with high yields. The use of a catalyst, water as solvent, and oxygen as oxidant make this process a promising and sustainable method to obtain biofuels.

    3. A Tandem Water-Splitting Device Based on a Bio-inspired Manganese Catalyst (pages 1146–1150)

      Dr. Robin Brimblecombe, Dr. Annette Koo, Prof. G. Charles Dismukes, Dr. Gerhard F. Swiegers and Prof. Leone Spiccia

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000171

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multiple photoanodes, comprising a manganese water oxidation catalyst doped in a Nafion membrane, are combined in series and powered with two dye-sensitized solar cells. The tandem device is capable of direct, solar-driven splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen.

    4. An Integrated Catalytic Approach to Fermentable Sugars from Cellulose (pages 1151–1153)

      Dr. Roberto Rinaldi, Philip Engel, Prof. Jochen Büchs, Dr. Antje C. Spiess and Prof. Ferdi Schüth

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000153

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The production of fermentable sugars from cellulose in almost quantitative yield is accelerated. Starting from cello-oligomers obtained by acid hydrolysis of cellulose in an ionic liquid, the catalytic approach described herein, integrating acid and enzymatic catalysis, quantitatively converts cellulose to fermentable sugars (glucose and cellobiose) within only a few hours.

    5. Renewable High-Octane Gasoline by Aqueous-Phase Hydrodeoxygenation of C5 and C6 Carbohydrates over Pt/Zirconium Phosphate Catalysts (pages 1154–1157)

      Dr. Ning Li, Dr. Geoffrey A. Tompsett and Prof. George W. Huber

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-octane gasoline is obtained by the aqueous-phase hydrodeoxygenation of both C5 and C6 aqueous sugar alcohol solutions. High yields are achieved by using a platinum/zirconia phosphate catalyst, showing how bifunctional catalysis can be tuned to selectively convert biomass-derived feedstocks into targeted fuels and chemicals.

    6. C[BOND]C Bond Formation Reactions for Biomass-Derived Molecules (pages 1158–1161)

      Dr. Ayyagari V. Subrahmanyam, Prof. Sankaran Thayumanavan and Prof. George W. Huber

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biomass is used as feedstock to produce renewable fuels and chemicals. To produce petroleum-derived fuels (between 8 to 15 carbons in length) from the major building blocks of biomass, which are carbohydrates of typically 5 or 6 carbons in length, there must be a C[BOND]C bond formation from the biomass-derived molecules. Chemical routes that can be employed to create C[BOND]C bonds from biomass-derived feedstocks are provided.

    7. You have free access to this content
      The Intrinsic Kinetics and Heats of Reactions for Cellulose Pyrolysis and Char Formation (pages 1162–1165)

      Joungmo Cho, Prof. Jeffrey M. Davis and Prof. George W. Huber

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000119

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thermochemical conversion of biomass starts with its pyrolysis. The intrinsic kinetics and heats of reactions for the three first reactions in cellulose pyrolysis are measured. The products from pyrolysis of cellulose can vary depending on the temperature of pyrolysis, with levoglucosan being formed at higher temperature. Furthermore, pyrolysis can be either exothermic or endothermic depending on the products formed.

    8. Selective Synthesis of N-Alkyl Hydroxylamines by Hydrogenation of Nitroalkanes using Supported Palladium Catalysts (pages 1166–1168)

      Dr. Yasumasa Takenaka, Takahiro Kiyosu, Dr. Jun-Chul Choi, Prof. Toshiyasu Sakakura and Prof. Hiroyuki Yasuda

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The selective hydrogenation of nitroalkanes to the corresponding N-alkyl hydroxylamines is achieved at room temperature with excellent yields (up to 98 %), by using common supported palladium catalysts. The reaction temperature is key to the highly selective formation of the hydroxylamines, which proceeds smoothly in a H2 atmosphere without additives. The catalyst can be recycled up to five times.

    9. Single-Stage Production of Highly Concentrated Hydrogen from Biomass-Derived Syngas (pages 1169–1171)

      Li He and Prof. De Chen

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Running out of steam: Integrating in situ removal of CO2 with the steam reforming and water–gas shift reactions of biomass-derived syngas containing alkanes and alkenes in a single reaction unit is demonstrated as an efficient approach to simplify production steps from biomass to hydrogen in gasification plants. The integrated sorption enhanced reaction yields hydrogen greater than 97 mol % at low temperatures of 500–575 °C and a steam to carbon ratio as low as 1.4.

    10. Conversion of Levulinic Acid and Formic Acid into γ-Valerolactone over Heterogeneous Catalysts (pages 1172–1175)

      Li Deng, Yan Zhao, Jiang Li, Prof. Yao Fu, Prof. Bing Liao and Prof. Qing-Xiang Guo

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      LA Lac′ers: The conversion of levulinic acid (LA) to γ-valerolactone is catalyzed by heterogeneous catalysts without using the external H2. Ru[BOND]P/SiO2 has been demonstrated to be a bifunctional catalyst giving a yield of 96 %. Through a two-step process, excellent performance can be achieved in eight recycling runs. Moreover, no hazardous 2-Me-THF is produced during the process.

    11. Fluoride-Modulated Cobalt Catalysts for Electrochemical Oxidation of Water under Non-Alkaline Conditions (pages 1176–1179)

      Dr. James B. Gerken, Elizabeth C. Landis, Prof. Robert J. Hamers and Prof. Shannon S. Stahl

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The acid test: Electrochemical oxidation of CoII salts in aqueous solution in the presence of fluoride (pH 3.5) results in formation of an heterogeneous cobalt oxide deposit on the electrode that serves as an electrocatalyst for water oxidation under mildly acidic conditions. Further studies reveal that fluoride is an effective proton acceptor for the oxygen-evolving reaction and lacks the inhibitory properties evident with other buffering electrolytes, such as inorganic phosphate.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. An Alternative Solvent-Free Synthesis of Nopinone under Ball-Milling Conditions: Investigation of Reaction Parameters (pages 1181–1191)

      Tony Szuppa, Dr. Achim Stolle, Prof. Bernd Ondruschka and Wieland Hopfe

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A solvent-free method for the synthesis of nopinone from the renewable monoterpene β-pinene in a ball mill is evaluated. The envisioned synthesis pathway uses non-hazardous reagents and is performed under ambient, non-inert reaction conditions. The influence of both technical and chemical reaction parameters on conversion, selectivity, and yield is assessed.

    2. Direct Synthesis of Ethanol from Dimethyl Ether and Syngas over Combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO Catalysts (pages 1192–1199)

      Prof. Xingang Li, Dr. Xiaoguang San, Yi Zhang, Takashi Ichii, Prof. Ming Meng, Prof. Yisheng Tan and Prof. Noritatsu Tsubaki

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Do or dual not: A dual-catalyst bed reactor loaded separately with the Cu/ZnO and H-Mordenite catalyst is employed to directly synthesize ethanol from dimethyl ether (DME) and syngas. The yield of ethanol and the main byproduct methanol are 42.2 % and 46.3 %, respectively. The latter can be further recycled to DME realizing an environmentally friendly process.

    3. Low Catalyst Loadings for the Production of Carboxylic Acids from Polysaccharides and Hydrogen Peroxide (pages 1200–1203)

      Dr. Chahinez Aouf, Dominique Harakat, Dr. Jacques Muzart, Boris Estrine, Sinisa Marinkovic, Cédric Ernenwein and Dr. Jean Le Bras

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oxidative depolymerization of polysaccharides and natural materials occurs under Fenton-type conditions. Some of the oxidized compounds facilitate the process, leading to the valuable production of carboxylic acids even with very low amounts of catalyst.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 11/2010 (page 1207)

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090042

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION