ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 2

Special Issue: MPI EnerChem

February 22, 2010

Volume 3, Issue 2

Pages 117–287

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Nanostructured Carbon and Carbon Nanocomposites for Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications (ChemSusChem 2/2010) (page 117)

      Dang Sheng Su  and Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a graphene layer as the basic structure unit of sp2-bounded carbon. By introducing curvature, defects, or heteroatoms into this unit, nanocarbons with various morphologies and properties can be derived. Nanocarbons and nanocarbon-based materials have become one of the most-studied classes of materials for catalysis, energy conversion, and even for CO2 capture. One example is the use of nanocarbons as new potential electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries and in supercapacitors. In their Review on page 136, D. S. Su. and R. Schlögl critically assess the most recent developments in electrochemical energy storage using this class of nanostructured carbons and composites.

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Frontiers of Chemistry in Paris (page 119)

      Peter Goelitz

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200907777

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      Editorial: Nanochemical Concepts for a Sustainable Energy Supply (page 120)

      Dang Sheng Su and Arne Thomas

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000028

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
    1. Nanostructured Carbon and Carbon Nanocomposites for Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications (pages 136–168)

      Dang Sheng Su  and Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900182

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      Nanocarbons and carbon-based nanocomposites are the most studied electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors. The advantages and shortcomings of nanostructured electrodes and future challenges in developing electrochemical energy storage materials are critically explored and discussed.

    2. Metal-Free Heterogeneous Catalysis for Sustainable Chemistry (pages 169–180)

      Dang Sheng Su , Jian Zhang, Benjamin Frank, Arne Thomas, Xinchen Wang, Jens Paraknowitsch and Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900180

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      No heavy metal: This Review highlights recent promising activities and developments in heterogeneous catalysis using only carbon and carbon nitride as catalysts. Carbon and carbon nitride combine environmental acceptability with inexhaustible resources and allow a favorable management of energy with good thermal conductivity.

  6. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
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    1. Nanostructured Poly(benzimidazole): From Mesoporous Networks to Nanofibers (pages 181–187)

      Jens Weber

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900122

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      High-performance polymers: Recent work devoted to the development of new synthetic pathways and processing routines towards nanostructured poly(benzimidazole) is presented. The applications of the resulting materials as proton conductors and catalysts are discussed.

    2. Porous Carbohydrate-Based Materials via Hard Templating (pages 188–194)

      Shiori Kubo, Rezan Demir-Cakan, Li Zhao, Robin J. White and Maria-Magdalena Titirici

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900126

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      Hydrothermal carbonization is a technique that allows the production of carbonaceous materials from biomass or biomass-based products in a cheap, CO2-neutral, green, and sustainable manner. This technique has recently been used to produce various carbonaceous materials and hybrids for a variety of applications such as adsorption, separation, electrochemistry, and energy conversion. In this Minireview the main directions and trends within this field are pointed out.

  7. Concepts

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
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    1. Towards Solar Fuels from Water and CO2 (pages 195–208)

      Gabriele Centi and Siglinda Perathoner

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900289

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      State of the art research advances on bioroutes, concentrated solar thermal and low-temperature conversion using semiconductors to produce solar fuels from water and CO2, are critically discussed in an attempt to define challenges and current limits and to identify the priorities on which focus research and development. The role of solar fuels produced from CO2 in comparison with solar H2 is analyzed and compared.

    2. The Role of Chemistry in the Energy Challenge (pages 209–222)

      Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900183

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      Renewable energy supply systems require knowledge-based systemic chemical processes and optimized materials. This paper focuses on the even greater role that “ENERCHEM” will have to play in the era of renewable energy systems where the storage of solar energy in chemical carries and batteries is a key requirement. Energy is chemistry.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
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    1. A Zero-Emission Fuel Cell that uses Carbonaceous Colloids from Biomass Waste as Fuel Source (pages 223–225)

      Jens Peter Paraknowitsch , Arne Thomas and Markus Antonietti

      Version of Record online: 27 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900168

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      Carbonaceous microspheres dispersed in water are produced from biomass waste by hydrothermal carbonization and used as fuel in an indirect carbon fuel cell (ICFC). Thus, a chemical pathway to an environment-friendly energy storage medium with zero emission balance regarding greenhouse gases is presented.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: A Zero-Emission Fuel Cell that Uses Carbonaceous Colloids from Biomass Waste as Fuel Source

      Vol. 3, Issue 4, 400, Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2010

    2. Structure–Function Correlations for Ru/CNT in the Catalytic Decomposition of Ammonia (pages 226–230)

      Weiqing Zheng, Jian Zhang, Bo Zhu, Raoul Blume, Yonglai Zhang, Klaus Schlichte, Robert Schlögl, Ferdi Schüth and Dang Sheng Su

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900217

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      Ruthenium-based catalysts exhibit promising properties in both ammonia decomposition and synthesis. A fundamental study on the structural effects of CNTs, when used as supports for Ru nanoparticles, and on the localization of Ru nanoparticles, on ammonia decomposition is reported. The observed trend is counter-intuitive to the general notion about the beneficial effect of a reduced particle size for better activity in a nonselective reaction.

    3. Highly Stable Lithium Storage Performance in a Porous Carbon/Silicon Nanocomposite (pages 231–235)

      Yong-Sheng Hu, Philipp Adelhelm, Bernd M. Smarsly and Joachim Maier

      Version of Record online: 8 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900191

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      A porous carbon/silicon nanocomposite was synthesized in a one-step procedure based on a “soft-templating” methodology, taking advantage of phase separation between mesophase-pitch and organic polymers as soft templates. The resulting nanocomposite exhibits a highly stable reversible capacity of 450 mA h g−1 in a vinylene carbonate-containing electrolyte.

    4. Fabrication of Cobalt and Cobalt Oxide/Graphene Composites: Towards High-Performance Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries (pages 236–239)

      Shubin Yang, Guanglei Cui, Shuping Pang, Qian Cao, Ute Kolb, Xinliang Feng, Joachim Maier and Klaus Müllen

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900106

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      Pave a way to high-performance anode materials: Organic metal/graphene composites are fabricated through an in situ assembly of disc-shaped phthalocyanine molecules with graphene sheets during the chemical reduction of graphite oxide, which enables a homogenous dispersion of Co and Co3O4 nanoparticles in the sheets after simple pyrolysis and oxidation. The resulting Co3O4/graphene composites exhibit remarkable lithium storage performance.

  9. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
    1. Transesterification of Triglycerides Using Nitrogen-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes (pages 241–245)

      Alberto Villa, Jean-Philippe Tessonnier, Olivier Majoulet, Dang Sheng Su and Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900181

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      Nitrogen-functionalized carbon nanotubes are synthesized by grafting amino groups onto the surface of the nanotubes. We demonstrate that the concentration of the active sites and the reaction parameters have strong effects on the activity of the catalysts in the transesterification of glyceryl tributyrate to methyl butanoate.

    2. One-Step Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons: Albumine Directing the Carbonization of Glucose (pages 246–253)

      Niki Baccile, Markus Antonietti and Maria-Magdalena Titirici

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900124

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      Hydrothermal treatment: We present a simple and green one-step pathway towards nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures with controlled mesoporosity through hydrothermal treatment of glucose in the presence of model proteins.

    3. Oxidative Purification of Carbon Nanotubes and Its Impact on Catalytic Performance in Oxidative Dehydrogenation Reactions (pages 254–260)

      Ali Rinaldi, Jian Zhang , Benjamin Frank, Dang Sheng Su, Sharifah Bee Abd Hamid and Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900179

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      Oxidative etching followed by annealing is proven to decrease the amount of amorphous carbon impurities on carbon nanotube (CNT) samples. When applying the CNTs as catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation reactions, the purification treatment is found to improve the selectivity.

    4. Composites of Molecular-Anchored Graphene and Nanotubes with Multitubular Structure: A New Type of Carbon Electrode (pages 261–265)

      Xi Liu, Yong-Sheng Hu, Jens-Oliver Müller, Robert Schlögl, Joachim Maier and Dang Sheng Su

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900187

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Modified graphene–carbon nanotube composites are synthesized and described. The composites display multitubular co-axial microstructures, consisting of three or more tubes formed along the pristine tube with a homogeneous thickness ranging from 10 to 50 nm.

    5. Which Controls the Depolymerization of Cellulose in Ionic Liquids: The Solid Acid Catalyst or Cellulose? (pages 266–276)

      Roberto Rinaldi, Niklas Meine, Julia vom Stein, Regina Palkovits and Ferdi Schüth

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900281

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      The factors responsible for the control of acid-catalyzed depolymerization of cellulose are presented here. Both cellulose and solid acid catalysts have distinct and important Practical aspects concerning the homogeneous nature of the catalysis, the effect of the ionic liquids impurities on the reaction performance, the suitability of different ionic liquids as solvents, and recyclability are also discussed in detail.

    6. Development of Molecular and Solid Catalysts for the Direct Low-Temperature Oxidation of Methane to Methanol (pages 277–282)

      Regina Palkovits, Christian von Malotki, Martin Baumgarten, Klaus Müllen, Christian Baltes, Markus Antonietti, Pierre Kuhn, Jens Weber, Arne Thomas and Ferdi Schüth

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900123

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      The direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol is demonstrated on both a highly active homogeneous molecular catalyst and on heterogeneous molecular catalysts based on polymeric materials. Superior activities are achieved and some heterogeneous systems maintain stability and activity for several catalytic cycles.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Concepts
    9. Communications
    10. Articles
    11. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 3/2010 (page 287)

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090007

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