ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 3

March 22, 2010

Volume 3, Issue 3

Pages 289–391

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
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    1. Cover Picture: Sustainable Conversion of Glucose into Hydrogen Peroxide in a Solid Polymer Electrolyte Microbial Fuel Cell (ChemSusChem 3/2010) (pages 289–290)

      Shi-Jie You , Jing-Yuan Wang, Nan-Qi Ren, Xiu-Heng Wang and Jin-Na Zhang

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090008

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      The cover picture is a schematic representation of a microbially catalyzed solid-polymer-electrolyte (SPE) microbial fuel cell (MFC) for the conversion of glucose into hydrogen peroxide, based on an electrocatalytical reaction that involves the two-electron reduction of gaseous oxygen. In their Communication on page 334, Shi-Jie You, Nan-Qi Ren, and co-workers from the Harbin Institute of Technology (PR China) and Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) report this new approach to the sustainable synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, which makes efficient and economical use of biomass materials.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
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  3. Corrigendum

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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      Acid Hydrolysis of Cellulose as the Entry Point into Biorefinery Schemes (page 296)

      Roberto Rinaldi and Ferdi Schüth

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090010

      This article corrects:

      Acid Hydrolysis of Cellulose as the Entry Point into Biorefinery Schemes

      Vol. 2, Issue 12, 1096–1107, Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2009

  4. News

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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
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  5. Review

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    1. Generation, Capture, and Utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide (pages 306–322)

      Andrew J. Hunt, Emily H. K. Sin, Ray Marriott and James H. Clark

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900169

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      The increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, such as CO2, from human activities are leading to an enhanced greenhouse effect. It is of vital importance to the long-term success of the human race that CO2 emissions are reduced in order to prevent damaging changes in climate. In this Review the opportunities for increased utilization of CO2 generated from industrial processes are explored.

  6. Communications

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    4. Corrigendum
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    1. Hydrothermal Reactions from Carbon Dioxide to Phenol (pages 323–324)

      Ge Tian, Chao He, Yan Chen, Hong-Ming Yuan, Zi-Wei Liu, Zhan Shi and Shou-Hua Feng

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900274

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      The formation of phenol by a hydrothermal reaction of carbon dioxide with water in the presence of iron powder is reported. The described method is a single-step process under mild conditions, using ecofriendly catalysts, and avoids the separation of products and the use of any solvent.

    2. Cellulose Conversion to Isosorbide in Molten Salt hydrate Media (pages 325–328)

      Rafael Menegassi de Almeida , Jianrong Li, Christian Nederlof, Paul O'Connor, Michiel Makkee and Jacob A. Moulijn

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900260

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      An efficient process concept for the production of isosorbide is reported. Lignocellulose (after hemicellulose removal) is treated with a molten salt hydrate ZnCl2 medium in which cellulose is dissolved and reactions proceed: hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose, hydrogenation of glucose to glucitol (sorbitol), and further dehydration of glucitol to isosorbide. The ZnCl2 hydrate medium intensifies hydrolysis and catalyzes dehydration.

    3. Aqueous Cationic Polyurethane Dispersions from Vegetable Oils (pages 329–333)

      Yongshang Lu and Richard C. Larock

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900251

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      Aqueous cationic polyurethane dispersions (PUDs) are synthesized by making use of raw vegetable oils as starting materials. The resulting environmentally friendly PUDs exhibit excellent physical properties, indicating great promise for use as adhesives, plastics, and coatings.

    4. Sustainable Conversion of Glucose into Hydrogen Peroxide in a Solid Polymer Electrolyte Microbial Fuel Cell (pages 334–338)

      Shi-Jie You , Jing-Yuan Wang, Nan-Qi Ren, Xiu-Heng Wang and Jin-Na Zhang

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900245

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      From biomass to H2O2: The sustainable synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from glucose can be achieved by using a solid polymer electrolyte-based microbial fuel cell operating on an anaerobic hydrogen-producing mixed culture.

    5. Recovery and Reuse of Nanoparticles by Tuning Solvent Quality (pages 339–341)

      Olesya Myakonkaya, Benoit Deniau, Julian Eastoe, Sarah E. Rogers , Aurelie Ghigo, Martin Hollamby, Ana Vesperinas, Meenakshisundaram Sankar, Stuart H. Taylor, Jonathan K. Bartley and Graham J. Hutchings

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900280

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      Nanoparticles Are Forever: An isothermal low-energy approach permits recovery of nanoparticles for reuse by tuning solvent quality. The recovered and redispersed nanoparticles retain their morphology and chemical reactivity for recycle and reuse. The method, shown here to be effective in the application of nanoparticles as catalysts, will have a wide and general applicability.

  7. Articles

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    1. A Comparative Study on the Lithium-Ion Storage Performances of Carbon Nanotubes and Tube-in-Tube Carbon Nanotubes (pages 343–349)

      Yi-Jun Xu, Xi Liu, Guanglei Cui, Bo Zhu, Gisela Weinberg, Robert Schlögl, Joachim Maier and Dang Sheng Su

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900131

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      Tube or not tube? A comparative study of the electrochemical performance of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes demonstrates a dependence effect of lithium-ion storage behavior on the detailed nanostructure of carbon nanotubes.

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      Efficient and Selective Dehydration of Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural Catalyzed by Brønsted-Acidic Ionic Liquids (pages 350–355)

      Xinli Tong and Yongdan Li

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900224

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      Highly efficient dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is developed in the presence of catalytic amounts of Brønsted-acidic ionic liquids (ILs). For example, a yield of 72.3 % HMF and selectivity of 87.2 % selectivity are obtained with [NMP]+[CH3SO3] as a catalyst under mild conditions.

    3. Self-Assembly of Thiophene- and Furan-Appended Methanofullerenes with Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) in Organic Solar Cells (pages 356–366)

      Pavel A. Troshin, Ekaterina A. Khakina, Martin Egginger, Andrey E. Goryachev, Sergey I. Troyanov, Anita Fuchsbauer, Alexander S. Peregudov, Rimma N. Lyubovskaya, Vladimir F. Razumov and N. Serdar Sariciftci

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900196

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      Fullerene derivatives with pendant thiophene or furan units self-assemble with poly(3-hexylthiophene) via π–π stacking and form ordered nanostructures, enabling their efficient operation in photovoltaic devices. Such intermolecular stabilization might be considered as a promising way to improve the lifetime of organic photovoltaics in the future.

    4. Palladium Catalyzed Direct 3-Arylation of Benzofurans using Low Catalyst Loadings (pages 367–376)

      Marina Ionita, Julien Roger and Henri Doucet

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900258

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      The palladium-catalyzed direct 3-arylation of 2-substituted benzofuran derivatives generally proceeds in moderate to good yields using only 0.1–0.5 mol % catalyst. A wide range of functional groups, such as acetyl, propionyl, formyl, ester, nitrile, trifluoromethyl, or fluoro on the aryl bromide is tolerated. Higher yields are obtained in the presence of electron-deficient aryl bromides.

    5. The Presence of Functional Groups Key for Biodegradation in Ionic Liquids: Effect on Gas Solubility (pages 377–385)

      Yun Deng, Saibh Morrissey, Nicholas Gathergood, Anne-Marie Delort, Pascale Husson and Margarida F. Costa Gomes

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900241

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      The solubility of several gases (carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and hydrogen) is studied following the incorporation of ester or of ester and ether functions in the side chain of the imidazolium cation of ionic liquids containing bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide or octylsulfate anions. The thermodynamic functions of solvation are calculated and provide information about solute–solvent interactions and the molecular structure of the solutions.

  8. Book Review

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    4. Corrigendum
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    1. Handbook of Plant-Based Biofuels. Edited by Ashok Pandey (pages 386–387)

      Paul J. Dauenhauer

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000009

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      CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2008. 297 pp., hardcover US$ 119.95—ISBN 978-1-56022-175-3

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    10. Preview
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      Preview: ChemSusChem 4/2010 (page 391)

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090012

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