ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 4

April 26, 2010

Volume 3, Issue 4

Pages 393–483

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Cover Picture: Photoelectron Generation by Photosystem II Core Complexes Tethered to Gold Surfaces (ChemSusChem 4/2010) (page 393)

      Michele Vittadello , Maxim Y. Gorbunov, Daniel T. Mastrogiovanni, Leszek S. Wielunski, Eric L. Garfunkel , Fernando Guerrero, Diana Kirilovsky, Miwa Sugiura, A. William Rutherford, Ahmad Safari and Paul G. Falkowski 

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture represents a tree of the future, as described by Giacomo Ciamician in the first half of the 20th century when he wrote about “industrial colonies without smoke and without smokestacks” and “forests of glass tubes…and glass buildings…everywhere” inside of which “the photochemical processes that hitherto” had “been the guarded secret of plants” could take place. In their work on page 471, Michele Vittadello and co-workers describe how photosystem II core complexes tethered to a gold surface may serve as efficient biomimetic photoelectron devices, bringing the realization of Ciamician's vision one step closer to reality. The cover image was prepared in collaboration with Nivi Alroy.

  2. Graphical Abstract

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
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      A Zero-Emission Fuel Cell that Uses Carbonaceous Colloids from Biomass Waste as Fuel Source (page 400)

      Jens Peter Paraknowitsch, Arne Thomas and Markus Antonietti

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000058

      This article corrects:

      A Zero-Emission Fuel Cell that uses Carbonaceous Colloids from Biomass Waste as Fuel Source

      Vol. 3, Issue 2, 223–225, Version of Record online: 27 OCT 2009

  4. News

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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
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  5. Review

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    1. Organic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons as Sensitizing Model Dyes for Semiconductor Nanoparticles (pages 410–428)

      Yongyi Zhang and Elena Galoppini

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900233

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      Live and Let Dye: This Review describes how model sensitizers prepared from organic polyaromatic hydrocarbons, particularly anchor–bridge–dye models, are used to elucidate fundamental aspects of heterogeneous charge transfer at the surface of a semiconductor for the development of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  6. Highlight

    1. Top of page
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    4. Corrigendum
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    1. Dealloying Shows the Way to New Catalysts (pages 429–430)

      Graham J. Hutchings

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000043

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      The preparation of highly effective catalysts by dealloying Au–Ag alloys was recently reported, and is discussed in this Highlight. The nanoporous gold catalysts are highly effective for the gas-phase oxidative coupling of methanol to form methyl formate under mild reaction conditions; the reaction is shown to proceed through a formate intermediate.

  7. Communications

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    1. A Continuous-Flow Method for the Generation of Hydrogen from Formic Acid (pages 431–434)

      Artur Majewski, David J. Morris, Kevin Kendall and Martin Wills

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000017

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      A continuous-flow method for generation of hydrogen from the ruthenium-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid in the presence of a base is described. The rate of addition of formic acid to the reactor is controlled by a temperature feedback mechanism or by an impedance-based feedback system.

    2. Facile One-Pot Synthesis of Nanoporous Carbon Nitride Solids by Using Soft Templates (pages 435–439)

      Yong Wang, Xinchen Wang, Markus Antonietti and Yuanjian Zhang

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900284

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      Nitrider: A polymeric semiconductor is synthesized by a one-step process, using a variety of block copolymers, nonionic surfactants, and even ionic liquids as a soft templates. The pore size and specific surface area are tunable via the template content and processing conditions. Triton X-100 and some selected ionic liquids give CN materials with accessible pore systems and high relative nitrogen contents.

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      Water-Tolerant Mesoporous-Carbon-Supported Ruthenium Catalysts for the Hydrolysis of Cellulose to Glucose (pages 440–443)

      Hirokazu Kobayashi, Tasuku Komanoya , Kenji Hara and Atsushi Fukuoka

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900296

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      Best Supporting Role: Ru/CMK-3 is a water-tolerant and reusable catalyst for the hydrolysis of cellulose, and exhibits high glucose yields and turnover numbers due to a synergistic effect between CMK-3 and Ru. CMK-3 contributes to the conversion of cellulose into oligosaccharides, while Ru promotes the hydrolysis of oligosaccharides to glucose.

  8. Articles

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    1. A Waste-Derived Biosurfactant for the Preparation of Templated Silica Powders (pages 445–452)

      Vittorio Boffa, Daniele G. Perrone, Enzo Montoneri, Giuliana Magnacca, Luca Bertinetti, Luisa Garlasco and Raniero Mendichi

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900205

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      A biosurfactant isolated from a mix of green and humid municipal refuses, aged for 110 days under aerobic conditions, is used to tailor the morphology of silica particles prepared via sol–gel synthesis. By varying the biosurfactant concentration in the reaction medium from 1 to 10 g L−1 it is possible to produce materials with a main pore size ranging from 4 to 30 nm. These results encourage the exploitation of urban refuse as a source of bioorganic products.

    2. Advanced Materials from Natural Materials: Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Wollastonites (pages 453–459)

      Meng-Qiang Zhao, Qiang Zhang, Jia-Qi Huang, Jing-Qi Nie and Fei Wei

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000002

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      Nature Materials to Advanced Materials: Wollastonite, a natural mineral, is used as a substrate for the synchronous growth of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), forming leaf- and brush-like wollastonite/CNT hybrids. SiO2/CNTs and aligned CNTs with a purity of 98.7 % are obtained via simple acid treatments. This is a promising route for using natural materials to prepare advanced materials with unique structures and properties that can be used as fillers, catalyst supports, or energy-absorbing materials.

    3. A Promising Approach to the Synthesis of 3D Nanoporous Graphitic Carbon as a Unique Electrocatalyst Support for Methanol Oxidation (pages 460–466)

      Jitendra N. Tiwari, Rajanish N. Tiwari, Yun-Min Chang and Kun-Lin Lin

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900223

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      3D nanoporous graphitic carbon is synthesized by the adamantane flame method, and used to support a Pt50–Ru50 alloy catalyst. The material has a large surface area, and electrochemical measurements show that the supported alloy has an excellent catalytic activity and stability towards methanol electro-oxidation, indicating the suitability of 3D nanoporous graphitic carbon as catalyst carrier for liquid-feed fuel cells.

    4. “Switchable Water”: Aqueous Solutions of Switchable Ionic Strength (pages 467–470)

      Sean M. Mercer and Philip G. Jessop

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000001

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      “Reversible salting out”: A series of additives dissolved in water can provide a reversible switch in ionic strength when reacted with CO2 providing the first switchable aqueous solvent. This system offers a new recyclable method of salting out water-miscible organics. Preliminary studies show that up to 87 % of THF can be forced out of a 1:1 (w/w) aqueous solution which can be reversed by removing CO2 from the system.

    5. Photoelectron Generation by Photosystem II Core Complexes Tethered to Gold Surfaces (pages 471–475)

      Michele Vittadello , Maxim Y. Gorbunov, Daniel T. Mastrogiovanni, Leszek S. Wielunski, Eric L. Garfunkel , Fernando Guerrero, Diana Kirilovsky, Miwa Sugiura, A. William Rutherford, Ahmad Safari and Paul G. Falkowski 

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900255

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      For Your Electrons Only: By using a nondestructive, ultrasensitive, fluorescence kinetic technique, the photochemical energy conversion efficiency and electron transfer kinetics on the acceptor side of histidine-tagged photosystem II core complexes tethered to gold surfaces are measured in situ.

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      Initial Performance Changes of Polymer/Fullerene Solar Cells by Short-Time Exposure to Simulated Solar Light (pages 476–480)

      Hwajeong Kim, Minjung Shin, Jiho Park and Youngkyoo Kim

      Version of Record online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900291

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      Changes of the initial performance of polymer/fullerene solar cells are investigated by continuous illumination with simulated solar light. The fill factor gradually decreases with exposure time, whereas the series resistance gradually increases. These initial performance changes are ascribed to a marginal change in the surface composition of the active layer.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 5/2010 (page 483)

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201090016

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