ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 1

January 17, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 1

Pages 1–151

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Catalytic Oxy-Functionalization of Methane and Other Hydrocarbons: Fundamental Advancements and New Strategies (ChemSusChem 1/2011) (page 1)

      Joanna R. Webb, Dr. Tamara Bolaño and Dr. T. Brent Gunnoe

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190000

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      The cover image of the January 2011 issue showcases the research of Joanna Webb, Tamara Bolaño, and Brent Gunnoe of the University of Virginia. Their Minireview on page 37 ff. outlines strategies towards the catalytic oxy-functionalization of methane and other hydrocarbons. The development of a catalyst for the controlled conversion of methane to methanol (MTM) would result in a paradigm shift for the chemical industry. Methanol can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity, can be converted to diesel fuel or gasoline, and can be used as a precursor to ethylene or propylene. Thus, the MTM process would allow natural gas to be used on a scale that is not currently conceivable.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Interdisciplinary, International, Inspiring! (page 3)

      Guido Kemeling and Peter Gölitz

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000440

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. The Hydrogen Issue (pages 21–36)

      Dr. Nicola Armaroli and Prof. Vincenzo Balzani

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000182

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      Energy: The hydrogen economy is often proposed by media and also by some scientists as the way out from fossil fuels. Is it an achievable goal? How far are we from it? This Review makes a critical analysis of the use of hydrogen in several different technologies.

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Catalytic Oxy-Functionalization of Methane and Other Hydrocarbons: Fundamental Advancements and New Strategies (pages 37–49)

      Joanna R. Webb, Dr. Tamara Bolaño and Dr. T. Brent Gunnoe

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000319

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      The controlled conversion of methane to methanol requires C[BOND]H bond cleavage and C[BOND]O bond formation. A catalytic cycle incorporating 1,2-CH-addition and net oxygen insertion with late transition metals has been proposed for this conversion. This Minireview discusses the current state of the art for each step of the proposed catalytic cycle.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-Diformylfuran, and Synthesis of a Fluorescent Material (pages 51–54)

      Jiping Ma, Dr. Zhongtian Du, Prof. Jie Xu, Dr. Qinghui Chu and Dr. Yi Pang

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000273

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      Furan fluorescence: 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural, available from biomass, is efficiently oxidized to 2,5-diformylfuran by using molecular oxygen, under mild conditions. The oxidation is catalyzed by Cu(NO3)2/VOSO4. The renewable, rather than petroleum-based, furan dialdehyde is used for the synthesis of a fluorescent material.

    2. Hydrolysis of Cellulose into Glucose by Magnetic Solid Acid (pages 55–58)

      Da-ming Lai, Li Deng, Jiang Li, Bing Liao, Prof. Qing-xiang Guo and Prof. Dr. Yao Fu

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000300

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      The main attraction: A magnetic solid acid with mesoporous structure was synthesized for the hydrolysis cellulose into glucose. Glucose is generated efficiently from amorphous cellulose in the mesopores of the catalyst with a yield of 50 %. Moreover, catalyst separation can be readily achieved by magnetic force.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Phosphotungstic Acid Encapsulated in Metal–Organic Framework as Catalysts for Carbohydrate Dehydration to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (pages 59–64)

      Dr. Yanmei Zhang, Dr. Volkan Degirmenci, Prof. Can Li and Prof. Emiel J. M. Hensen

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000284

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      Solid acid for biomass valorization: Phosphotungstic acid encapsulated in the metal–organic framework MIL-101 is an effective and reusable catalyst for the selective dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a renewable chemical platform for the production of liquid fuels and fine chemicals.

    2. Use of Polyoxometalate Catalysts in Ionic Liquids to Enhance the Dissolution and Delignification of Woody Biomass (pages 65–73)

      Ning Sun, Dr. Xinyu Jiang, Mirela L. Maxim, Dr. Andreas Metlen and Prof. Robin D. Rogers

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000272

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      The polyoxometalate [PV2Mo10O40]5−, in both acidic and ionic liquid-compatible form, acts as a catalyst for the dissolution and delignification of wood in ionic liquids, leading to faster dissolution and lower lignin content in the recovered cellulose-rich materials (isolated pulp), but also to lower lignin yields owing to the oxidation of lignin.

    3. Synthesis and Photocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Niobium Oxynitrides with Wide Visible-Light Absorption Bands (pages 74–78)

      Bhavin Siritanaratkul, Dr. Kazuhiko Maeda, Dr. Takashi Hisatomi and Prof. Kazunari Domen

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000207

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      The preparation conditions and characterization of a perovskite niobium oxynitride, CaNbO2N, are described. This photocatalyst, containing a band gap of 2.0 eV, produces hydrogen and oxygen from water containing an electron donor and acceptor, respectively, under irradiation with wavelengths up to 560 nm.

    4. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose to Prepare Levoglucosenone Using Sulfated Zirconia (pages 79–84)

      Zhi Wang, Dr. Qiang Lu, Prof. Xi-Feng Zhu and Prof. Ying Zhang

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000210

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      It′s not diamond, it′s zirconia: SO42−/ZrO2 is an efficient catalyst for the production of levoglucosenone by fast pyrolysis of cellulose admixing catalysts. The optimal temperature for preparation of levoglucosenone is in the range of 320–350 °C. In the presence of the SO42−/ZrO2, the levoglucosenone content of pyrolysis liquid is greatly increased at 335 °C compared to pure cellulose.

    5. Waste-Derived Bioorganic Substances for Light-Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygenated Species (pages 85–90)

      Prof. Alessandra Bianco Prevot, Dr. Paola Avetta, Dr. Debora Fabbri, Dr. Enzo Laurenti, Tatiana Marchis, Daniele G. Perrone, Prof. Enzo Montoneri and Dr. Vittorio Boffa

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000237

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      An offer you can't refuse: A bioorganic substance isolated from a composted urban refuse (AC8) is applied as sensitizer in the photodegradation of 4-chlorophenol. Production of OH and 1O2 species is monitored by EPR spectroscopy and the data suggest that the role played by these species in the photodegradation process is strictly related to AC8 concentration. AC8 is thereby proven to be a photosensitizer for applications in environmental remediation.

    6. Aluminophosphates for CO2 Separation (pages 91–97)

      Dr. Qingling Liu, Ngo Chuen Ocean Cheung, Dr. Alfonso E. Garcia-Bennett and Dr. Niklas Hedin

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000256

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      Aluminophosphates with 8-ring window apertures: (AlPO4-17, AlPO4-18, AlPO4-53, and AlPO4-25) are synthesized and studied for CO2 capture. Their high selectivity and hydrophobic properties at low relative humidity make them promising adsorbents for flue gas separation, at low energy costs.

    7. Environmental Implications of the Surfactant Effect on the Photochemistry of (Substituted) 4-Chlorophenols in Water (pages 98–103)

      Veronica Canevari, Prof. Maurizio Fagnoni, Prof. Pietro Bortolus and Prof. Angelo Albini

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000277

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      The photochemical behavior of selected chlorophenols is investigated in aqueous medium in the presence of surfactants (anionic, cationic, and nonionic). Dechlorination is efficient in every case, but in micelles, clean photoreduction results independent of the surfactant used, whereas in neat water, a complex mixture of products is obtained.

    8. Chemistry by Nanocatalysis: First Example of a Solid-Supported RAPTA Complex for Organic Reactions in Aqueous Medium (pages 104–111)

      Dr. Sergio E. García-Garrido, Javier Francos, Dr. Victorio Cadierno, Prof. Jean-Marie Basset and Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000280

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      RAPTA's delight: A nano-RAPTA complex supported on silica-coated ferrite nanoparticles proved to be a general, very efficient and easily reusable catalyst for three synthetically useful organic transformations; selective nitrile hydration, redox isomerization of allylic alcohols, and heteroannulation of (Z)-enynols. The use of low metal concentrations, water as a reaction medium, and microwaves as an energy source renders these processes green and sustainable.

    9. Efficient Conversion of Furfuryl Alcohol into Alkyl Levulinates Catalyzed by an Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Solid Acid Catalyst (pages 112–118)

      Dr. Zehui Zhang, Kun Dong and Prof. Zongbao (Kent) Zhao

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000231

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      Size zero waste: A clean, facile, and environment-friendly catalytic method has been developed for the conversion of furfuryl alcohol into alkyl levulinates, making use of the novel solid catalyst methylimidazolebutylsulfate phosphotungstate ([MIMBS]3PW12O40). Under the optimal conditions, a high n-butyl levulinate yield of up to 93 % was obtained, with easy work-up procedures and minimal waste generation.

    10. [70]Fullerene-Based Materials for Organic Solar Cells (pages 119–124)

      Pavel A. Troshin, Harald Hoppe, Alexander S. Peregudov, Martin Egginger, Sviatoslav Shokhovets, Gerhard Gobsch, N. Serdar Sariciftci and Vladimir F. Razumov

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000246

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      She sells C cells: Novel highly soluble derivatives of [70]fullerene show promising efficiencies in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells comprising the polymers MDMO-PPV and P3HT as electron donors. A clear correlation is revealed between the degree of phase separation in the fullerene/polymer blends (average cluster size) and their photovoltaic performance.

    11. Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes as Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Polymer Batteries (pages 125–130)

      Dr. M. A. Navarra, J. Manzi, L. Lombardo, Prof. S. Panero and Prof. Bruno Scrosati

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000254

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      Electrolyte orchestration: Polymer membranes based on a unique ionic liquid have been prepared and characterized as electrolytes for lithium batteries. The addition of a discrete amount of a selected organic solvent mixture was found to greatly improve the ionic conductivity and the interface properties of the composite membrane in contact with lithium electrodes, thus allowing the formation of a high-performance Li-metal–polymer battery.

    12. Catalytic Conversion of Carbohydrates into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Germanium(IV) Chloride in Ionic Liquids (pages 131–138)

      Zehui Zhang, Qian Wang, Prof. Haibo Xie, Dr. Wujun Liu and Prof. Zongbao (Kent) Zhao

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000279

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      Ge whiz: Germanium(IV) chloride in ionic liquids catalyzes the direct conversion of carbohydrates into 5- hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The catalyst shows excellent activity for fructose dehydration, and a high yield of HMF up to 90 % is obtained in 5 min. This nontoxic catalytic system is also efficient for other carbohydrates such as glucose, sucrose, and even cellulose.

    13. Enhancement in Dibenzothiophene Reactive Adsorption from Liquid Fuel via Incorporation of Sulfur Heteroatoms into the Nanoporous Carbon Matrix (pages 139–147)

      Dr. Mykola Seredych, Monmon Khine and Prof. Teresa J. Bandosz

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000366

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      Sulfur atoms present in the carbon matrix increase the breakthrough capacity of dibenzothiophenes and the selectivity of dibenzothiophene adsorption owing to sulfur–sulfur and sulfur–oxygen interactions. The catalytic influence of the carbon functionality results in the oxidation of adsorbed dibenzothiophenes (see Scheme).

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 2/2011 (page 151)

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190002

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