ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 10

Special Issue: Energy Materials

October 17, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 10

Pages 1325–1507

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
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    1. Cover Picture: (ChemSusChem 10/2011) (page 1325)

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190040

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      The front cover of this special issue on “Advanced Materials for Sustainable Energy and a Greener Environment” highlights the three featured hot research topics: (1) the use of natural systems to design functional materials (see Fan et al., Xu et al.); (2) the use of solar energy for environmental remediation, electricity production, and as an energy source for chemical transformation (see Palmisano et al., Aprile et al., Wu et al., Cheng et al. and Wu et al.); and (3) new materials for energy storage and conversion (see Lobato et al., Schwenzer et al. and Liu et al.,) and for more efficient and sustainable chemical processes to reduce the consumption energy and raw materials (see Chen et al., Siffert et al., Yuan et al., Prato et al., and Bonifazi et al.).

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
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    1. Inside Cover: (ChemSusChem 10/2011) (page 1326)

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190041

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      Nature is a great school for materials science. Materials found in nature have many inspiring structures, such as hierarchical organizations, periodic architectures, or nanostructures, which endow them with amazing functions, such as energy harvesting and conversion, antireflection, or others. Biotemplated materials with structural specialty, complexity, and related unique functions could be applied for areas of energy and environment technologies with enhanced performances. Furthermore, many useful prototypes of nature could be used for the biomimetic design of novel materials or systems for a sustainable world.

  3. Editorial

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Advanced Materials for Sustainable Energy and a Greener Environment (pages 1327–1331)

      Prof. Bao-Lian Su , Prof. Qingjie Zhang, Prof. Davide Bonifazi and Prof. Jinlin Li

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100614

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      Materials for sustainability: The consumption rate of fossil fuels compared to the available resources and the calamity of global warming are two problems currently facing humanity. This issue describes research to address these problems, focusing on the use of natural systems to design functional materials, solar energy for environmental remediation, electricity production, and as energy source, and new materials for energy storage and conversion.

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 10/2011 (pages 1333–1337)

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190042

  5. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
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  6. Reviews

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    7. Reviews
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    1. Biotemplated Materials for Sustainable Energy and Environment: Current Status and Challenges (pages 1344–1387)

      Dr. Han Zhou, Prof. Tongxiang Fan and Prof. Di Zhang

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100048

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      Respect the hierarchy! Natural materials have inspiring structures and amazing functions. We highlight the synthesis and applications of biotemplated materials for six key areas of energy and environmental technologies, namely, photocatalytic H2 evolution, CO2 reduction, solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, photocatalytic degradation, and gas/vapor sensing (see picture).

    2. Membrane Development for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (pages 1388–1406)

      Dr. Birgit Schwenzer, Dr. Jianlu Zhang, Dr. Soowhan Kim, Dr. Liyu Li, Dr. Jun Liu and Dr. Zhenguo Yang

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100068

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      Vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) offer the potential to overcome problems of large-scale energy storage in the megawatt range. The underlying basic science issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and an overview of membrane-related research approaches are presented.

  7. Minireviews

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    4. Editorial
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    1. Metal Phosphonate Hybrid Mesostructures: Environmentally Friendly Multifunctional Materials for Clean Energy and Other Applications (pages 1407–1419)

      Tian-Yi Ma and Prof. Zhong-Yong Yuan

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100050

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      Friendly multis: Organic–inorganic hybrid mesoporous metal phosphonate materials can be prepared from a series of polyphosphonic acids, and their structure can be tuned to wormhole-like, cellular foam, hexagonal, and cubic morphologies. These materials are environmentally friendly and can be used in adsorption, separation, solar light utilization, and catalysis. In this Minireview, recent progress in the preparation of mesoporous metal phosphonate materials is summarized.

    2. Noble-Metal-Based Catalysts Supported on Zeolites and Macro-Mesoporous Metal Oxide Supports for the Total Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (pages 1420–1430)

      Tarek Barakat, Dr. Joanna C. Rooke, Dr. Haingomalala Lucette Tidahy, Dr. Mahsa Hosseini, Dr. Renaud Cousin, Prof. Jean-François Lamonier, Dr. Jean-Marc Giraudon, Prof. Guy De Weireld, Prof. Bao-Lian Su and Prof. Stéphane Siffert

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100282

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      Fluffy supports do better: This Minireview discusses the use of porous multimodal oxide materials and non-porous materials or zeolites as supports for the preparation of noble metal-based catalysts. The oxides offer not only a high activity in the oxidation of VOCs, but also reaction conditions that reduce the formation of by-products and coke deposition. The hierarchical nature of the porous network provides a larger surface area for a good dispersion of the deposited active phase.

    3. Titania Photocatalysts for Selective Oxidations in Water (pages 1431–1438)

      Prof. Leonardo Palmisano, Prof. Vincenzo Augugliaro, Dr. Marianna Bellardita, Prof. Agatino Di Paola, Dr. Elisa García López, Dr. Vittorio Loddo, Dr. Giuseppe Marcì, Dr. Giovanni Palmisano and Dr. Sedat Yurdakal 

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100196

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      Counting on substrate and oxidation: The Minireview illustrates the use of heterogeneous photocatalysis for performing selective oxidation reactions of alcohols dissolved in water. For instance, the hydroxylation of benzene bearing both, an electron donor group (EDG) or an electron withdrawing group (EWG), and the formation of various aldehydes from the corresponding alcohols are presented.

    4. Hybrid Materials that Integrate Living Cells: Improved Eco-Adaptation and Environmental Applications (pages 1439–1446)

      Prof. Dr. Xurong Xu, Dr. Ben Wang and Prof. Dr. Ruikang Tang

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100043

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      Cell of Duty: The integration of living cells into hybrid materials enables the use of these cells in various new applications, under conditions that would normally be too harsh. Material scientists seek to develop materials-based chemical strategies to allow the cells to survive such environments and be used in, for example, biosensors, bioreactors, and self-powered devices. This Minireview provides an overview of artificial coatings for cell protection.

  8. Communications

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    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
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    1. Tailored Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes for Electrocatalytic Water Splitting and Sustainable Energy Applications (pages 1447–1451)

      Dr. Francesca Maria Toma, Dr. Andrea Sartorel, Dr. Matteo Iurlo, Dr. Mauro Carraro, Dr. Stefania Rapino, Lena Hoober-Burkhardt, Dr. Tatiana Da Ros, Dr. Massimo Marcaccio, Prof. Gianfranco Scorrano, Prof. Francesco Paolucci, Prof. Marcella Bonchio and Prof. Maurizio Prato

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100089

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      Oxygenic carbon nanotubes: Covalent and non-covalent strategies are utilized for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with positively charged groups and subsequently negatively charged, inorganic catalysts, leading nanomaterials for electrocatalytic water splitting. Both multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes react with under microwave irradiation and solvent-free conditions, whereas the formation of non-covalent nanoconjugates is accomplished by reaction of carbon nanotubes with trimethylammonium acetyl pyrene.

    2. Multimodal Zeolite-Beta-Based Catalysts with a Hierarchical, Three-level Pore Structure (pages 1452–1456)

      Dr. Li-Hua Chen, Xiao-Yun Li, Dr. Ge Tian, Dr. Yu Li, Hai-Yan Tan, Prof. Dr. Gustaaf Van Tendeloo, Prof. Dr. Guang-Shan Zhu, Prof. Dr. Shi-Lun Qiu, Prof. Dr. Xiao-Yu Yang and Prof. Dr. Bao-Lian Su

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100181

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      Hole diggers: The hierarchically structured porous solid-acid catalyst described in this report possess a remarkable pore system, encompassing well-defined macrochannels, interconnected mesopores, intracrystalline mesopores, and tunable zeolite micropores. Importantly, the catalyst exhibits very strong acidity and superior catalytic activity for esterification reactions.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
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    1. A Non-Aqueous Synthesis of TiO2/SiO2 Composites in Supercritical CO2 for the Photodegradation of Pollutants (pages 1457–1463)

      Jasper Jammaer, Prof. Carmela Aprile, Sammy W. Verbruggen, Prof. Silvia Lenaerts, Prof. Paolo P. Pescarmona and Prof. Johan A. Martens

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100059

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      Titania/silica composites with different Ti/Si ratios are synthesized via a non-aqueous synthesis route, involving the reaction of metal alkoxides and formic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide The high-surface-area composites photocatalytically degrade phenol in aqueous medium, and can eliminate acetaldehyde from air.

    2. Carbon Nanotube-Based Metal-Ion Catchers as Supramolecular Depolluting Materials (pages 1464–1469)

      Laura Maggini, Federica De Leo, Dr. Riccardo Marega, Hajnalka-Mária Tóháti, Prof. Katalin Kamarás and Prof. Dr. Davide Bonifazi

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100163

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      Sink into the black: A new supramolecular depolluting material based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) able to reversibly and selectively trap transition-metal ions is reported (see picture). This is the first example of an easy and fully sustainable material with a great potential for applications in depolluting liquid waste from metal contamination.

    3. Dielectric Properties of Lead-Free BZT–KNN Perovskite Ceramics for Energy Storage (pages 1470–1474)

      Dong-Yun Gui, Dr. Han-Xing Liu, Dr. Hua Hao, Yue Sun, Dr. Ming-He Cao and Dr. Zhi-Yong Yu

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100451

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      Relaxing between the sheets: Lead-free perovskite ceramics have potential applications for energy storage, and their microstructure strongly affects their suitability. In (1−x)Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3x(K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 (BZT–KNN) the response of a sheet structure (X), an additional feature of this particular material compared to the typical grain (G) and grain boundary (GB) properties, plays an important role in its relaxation dielectric properties.

    4. Hydrogen Production by Photoelectrochemically Splitting Solutions of Formic Acid (pages 1475–1480)

      Lei Li, Wenliang Guo, Yusong Zhu and Prof. Dr. Yuping Wu

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100167

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      Do the splits: A TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode is prepared by a dip-coating method and used as a photoanode to split an aqueous solution of formic acid to produce hydrogen (see picture). The splitting voltage is substantially lower and the energy-conversion efficiency can be 1.79 %.

    5. Three-Dimensionally Ordered Macroporous Titania with Structural and Photonic Effects for Enhanced Photocatalytic Efficiency (pages 1481–1488)

      Dr. Min Wu, Prof. Yu Li, Dr. Zhao Deng and Prof. Bao-Lian Su

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100082

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      Titania illuminated: Dimensionally ordered macroporous (DOM) titania, prepared by using a 480 nm colloidal template and calcined at 700 °C, demonstrates the best photocatalytic activity, which can be attributed to the effects of both structural and photonic properties.

    6. Promising TiOSO4 Composite Polybenzimidazole-Based Membranes for High Temperature PEMFCs (pages 1489–1497)

      Dr. Justo Lobato, Prof. Pablo Cañizares, Prof. Manuel A. Rodrigo, Diego Úbeda and F. Javier Pinar

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100032

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      Performance pays for stability: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental mapping are used to record (a) an SEM image of the surface, and the distributions of (b) sulphur and (c) titanium in a TiOSO4–polymer composite membrane. Fuel cells employing such a membrane reveal an improved stability under harsh cycling conditions.

    7. Effect of Mesoporous TiO2 Bead Diameter in Working Electrodes on the Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1498–1503)

      Yang Chen, Dr. Fuzhi Huang, Dr. Dehong Chen, Lu Cao, Dr. Xiao Li Zhang, Prof. Rachel A. Caruso  and Prof. Yi-Bing Cheng

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100060

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      Big beads better: The effect of the diameter of mesoporous TiO2 beads in dye-sensitized solar cells is studied. Cells with larger beads achieve the highest conversion efficiency, mainly because of their higher electron diffusion coefficient.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 11/2011 (page 1507)

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190044

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