ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 12

December 16, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 12

Pages 1697–1855

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Versatile Protocol for the Quantitative and Smooth Conversion of Phosphane Oxides into Synthetically Useful Pyrazolylphosphonium Salts (ChemSusChem 12/2011) (page 1697)

      Kai-Oliver Feldmann, Stephen Schulz, Felix Klotter and Dr. Jan J. Weigand

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going uphill: The diverse chemistry established for phosphorus is mainly focused on neutral or anionic examples. Therefore, an extension of research efforts towards cationic phosphorus compounds would be desirable. However, the preparation of such compounds is restricted because of synthetic limitations. In their Full Paper on page 1805, Jan J. Weigand and co-workers at the University of Münster describe a new method for the conversion of phosphane oxides into synthetically useful cationic organophosphorus compounds using a highly-charged phosphorus-centered trication under very mild reaction and work-up conditions. Furthermore, the protocol developed for the reaction might also be applicable for the transformation of functional phosphane oxides, implementing a novel synthetic route to tertiary phosphanes that are used as ligands in transition-metal-mediated reactions.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 12/2011 (pages 1699–1705)

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190050

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: The Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formate/Formic Acid: Engineering and Economic Feasibility (page 1705)

      Dr. Arun S. Agarwal, Dr. Yumei Zhai, Dr. Davion Hill and Dr. Narasi Sridhar

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100752

      This article corrects:

      The Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formate/Formic Acid: Engineering and Economic Feasibility

      Vol. 4, Issue 9, 1301–1310, Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Heterogeneous Fenton Catalysts Based on Activated Carbon and Related Materials (pages 1712–1730)

      Dr. Sergio Navalon, Dr. Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Dr. Mercedes Alvaro and Prof. Hermenegildo Garcia

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100216

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon attacks! Activated carbon and other types of carbonaceous materials have been widely used as catalysts and supports to promote the degradation of organic pollutants by the generation of hydroxyl radicals from H2O2.

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane as a Hydrogen Source: Fundamental Issues and Potential Solutions Towards Implementation (pages 1731–1739)

      Udishnu Sanyal, Dr. Umit B. Demirci, Prof. Balaji R. Jagirdar and Prof. Philippe Miele

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100318

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Borane and ammonia have an issue: Ammonia borane, NH3BH3, is a promising hydrogen storage material owing to its high hydrogen density (19.6 wt % and 0.145 kgmath imageL−1) and its ability to release H2 through hydrolysis under ambient conditions. However, the implementation of this reaction is impeded by fundamental issues affecting all of the chemical compounds involved in the process. The discussion of these issues forms the core of this Minireview.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Quantum Rod-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1741–1744)

      Dr. Zhijun Ning, Chunze Yuan, Dr. Haining Tian, Dr. Peter Hedström, Prof. Licheng Sun and Prof. Hans Ågren

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100582

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An electron injection highway: CdSe nanorods with CdS seed material were applied to a quantum rod-sensitized TiO2 solar cell that showed a higher electron injection efficiency than analogous quantum dot-sensitized solar cells: reducing the nanocrystals′ carrier confinement dimensions can improve electron injection efficiency of nanocrystal-sensitized solar cells.

    2. The Production of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from Fructose in Isopropyl Alcohol: A Green and Efficient System (pages 1745–1748)

      Linke Lai and Dr. Yugen Zhang

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100489

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solving problems: An isopropyl alcohol-mediated reaction system for the production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from fructose reaches a yield of up to 87 %. The solvent can be easily recycled by evaporation, giving the HMF product. The system avoids the use of large amounts of organic solvent, has a minimal environmental impact, and offers a new route to large-scale economically viable processes.

    3. Direct Hydrocyclization of Biomass-Derived Levulinic Acid to 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran over Nanocomposite Copper/Silica Catalysts (pages 1749–1752)

      Pravin P. Upare , Dr. Jong-Min Lee, Dr. Young Kyu Hwang , Dr. Dong Won Hwang, Jeong-Ho Lee, Dr. Shiva B. Halligudi, Dr. Jin-Soo Hwang and Dr. Jong-San Chang 

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100380

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copper/silica nanocomposite catalysts prove efficient for the direct hydrocyclization of biomass-derived levulinic acid to cyclic 2-methyltetrahydrofuran in the vapor phase, at moderate hydrogen pressures. A nickel-promoted copper/silica catalyst with a high copper loading (72 wt %) is particularly effective for the direct hydrocyclization (89 % selectivity). The catalysts are stable during long-term experiments, showing little sign of leaching or sintering.

    4. High-Performance Nanofiber Fuel Cell Electrodes (pages 1753–1757)

      Dr. Wenjing Zhang and Prof. Peter N. Pintauro

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100245

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanofiber electrode is fabricated by electrospinning an ink composed of Pt/C catalyst particles in a solution of Nafion and poly(acrylic acid). Exceptionally high power densities and platinum mass activity are achieved when using the mat as cathode in H2/air and H2/O2 fuel cell membrane–electrode assemblies. The nanofiber cathode also exhibits outstanding stability in accelerated durability tests.

    5. Effective Production of Octane from Biomass Derivatives under Mild Conditions (pages 1758–1761)

      Wenjie Xu, Qineng Xia, Yu Zhang, Yong Guo, Prof. Yanqin Wang and Prof. Guanzhong Lu

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100361

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cool cats don′t feel pressure: Furfural is catalytically converted into octane in high yields at relatively low pressures and temperatures. In a three-step process, two bifunctional catalysts, Pt/Co2AlO4 and Pt/NbOPO4, play crucial roles in achieving C8-ols from 4-(2-furyl)-3-buten-2-one and transforming the C8-ols into octane, respectively.

    6. Tailored Ruthenium–N-Heterocyclic Carbene Hybrid Catalytic Materials for the Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide in the Presence of Amine (pages 1762–1765)

      Mathieu Baffert, Dr. Tarun K. Maishal, Laurent Mathey, Prof. Dr. Christophe Copéret  and Dr. Chloé Thieuleux

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100223

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hidden depths: Heterogeneous catalysts containing single-site ruthenium–bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) species are obtained by designing tailored hybrid organic–inorganic materials and in situ transformations, leading to final Ru-NHC units. These catalysts represent promising alternatives to homogeneous complexes with comparable activities (turnover number of ca. 3000).

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. An Efficient Palladium Catalyst System for the Oxidative Carbonylation of Glycerol to Glycerol Carbonate (pages 1767–1772)

      Jianglin Hu, Prof. Yanlong Gu, Zhenhong Guan, Jinjin Li, Dr. Wanling Mo, Prof. Tao Li and Guangxing Li

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100337

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      N Y Pd: A zeolite-Y-confined Pd catalyst, PdCl2(phen)@Y, enables the synthesis of glycerol carbonate by oxidative carbonylation of glycerol. Excellent conversion (95 %) and selectivity (98 %) are achieved with a very high glycerol-to-Pd molar ratio (2000). The catalyst can be re-used five times, without a significant decrease in activity and selectivity.

    2. Nanostructured Membranes for Enzyme Catalysis and Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles (pages 1773–1777)

      Dr. Vasile Smuleac, Dr. Rajender Varma, Dr. Babita Baruwati, Dr. Subhas Sikdar and Prof. Dibakar Bhattacharyya

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Robust multifunctional membranes: Reactive membranes can be synthesized on a common, highly versatile support, polyvinylidene fluoride/poly(acrylic acid) membrane pores, by immobilization of enzymes or nanoparticles. Bioreactor–nanodomain interactions and mixed matrix nanocomposite membranes provide a versatile system compared to conventional membranes that can be applied to catalysis of chemically important reactions.

    3. A General and Expedient Synthesis of 5- and 6-Membered Cyclic Carbonates by Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of 1,2- and 1,3-Diols (pages 1778–1786)

      Prof. Dr. Bartolo Gabriele, Dr. Raffaella Mancuso, Prof. Giuseppe Salerno, Dr. Lucia Veltri, Prof. Mirco Costa and Prof. Dr. Angela Dibenedetto

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100250

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Straight to the carbonate: 1,2- and 1,3-diols have been converted into the corresponding 5- and 6-membered cyclic carbonates by direct palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation using only O2 as the oxidizing agent. The method is applied to the synthesis of high-value-added glycerol carbonate from glycerol, a readily available feedstock.

    4. Catalytic Partial Oxidation and Membrane Separation to Optimize the Conversion of Natural Gas to Syngas and Hydrogen (pages 1787–1795)

      Dr. Daniela Capoferri, Dr. Barbara Cucchiella, Dr. Gaetano Iaquaniello, Dr. Alessia Mangiapane, Dr. Salvatore Abate and Prof. Gabriele Centi

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Very synsible: The multistep integration of hydrogen-selective membranes into catalytic partial oxidation technology to convert natural gas into syngas and hydrogen is reported. Obtaining the same feed conversion at milder operating conditions translates into reduced natural gas consumption (and CO2 emissions) and a reduction in variable operative costs of approximately 10 % compared to conventional catalytic partial oxidation.

    5. Sonochemical Synthesis of 0D, 1D, and 2D Zinc Oxide Nanostructures in Ionic Liquids and Their Photocatalytic Activity (pages 1796–1804)

      Tarek Alammar and Prof. Dr. Anja-Verena Mudring

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Morphological control by ionic liquids: The physical and chemical properties of ZnO nanomaterials is critically dependent on particle size, (surface) defects, and morphology, which makes the development of synthesis protocols, which are optimized for well-defined ZnO nanostructures, essential. We report a fast and efficient, yet morphologically selective, synthetic route in ionic liquids.

    6. A Versatile Protocol for the Quantitative and Smooth Conversion of Phosphane Oxides into Synthetically Useful Pyrazolylphosphonium Salts (pages 1805–1812)

      Kai-Oliver Feldmann, Stephen Schulz, Felix Klotter and Dr. Jan J. Weigand

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going uphill: A protocol for the smooth conversion of the resistant P[BOND]O bond in phosphane oxides into a reactive P[BOND]N bond of synthetically useful pyrazolylphosphonium salts by a highly-charged, oxophilic phosphorus-centered trication is described. The reactions are conducted at room temperature with quantitative yields. We aim towards alternatives to existing reduction methods for phosphane oxide functionalization.

    7. Epoxidation of Alkenes Catalyzed by Phenyl Group-Modified, Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica-Entrapped, Dimeric Manganese–Salen Complexes (pages 1813–1822)

      Jianglei Hu , Qingyin Wu, Wei Li, Ling Ma, Fang Su, Prof. Dr. Yihang Guo and Prof. Dr. Yongqing Qiu

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100382

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Manganese starts acting cagey: 3D cage-like, phenyl group-modified, periodic mesoporous organosilica-entrapped, dimeric manganese–salen complexes prepared by entrapment and silylation exhibit considerably higher catalytic activity and stability towards the epoxidation of alkenes than their monomeric analogues and the starting homogeneous dimeric manganese–salen complexes.

    8. Renewable Rigid Diamines: Efficient, Stereospecific Synthesis of High Purity Isohexide Diamines (pages 1823–1829)

      Dr. Shanmugam Thiyagarajan, Linda Gootjes, Willem Vogelzang, Dr. Jacco van Haveren, Dr. Martin Lutz and Dr. Daan S. van Es

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Turning up the stereo: An efficient three-step strategy for synthesizing chiral biobased dideoxy-diamino isoidide and dideoxy-diamino isosorbide in high yield with absolute stereo control is described. These highly interesting chiral building blocks are presently the subject of several investigations due to their application in high-performance biobased polymers such as polyamides and polyurethanes.

    9. Multilayered Supported Ionic Liquids as Catalysts for Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide: A High-Throughput Study in Supercritical Conditions (pages 1830–1837)

      Prof. Carmela Aprile, Dr. Francesco Giacalone, Paola Agrigento, Dr. Leonarda F. Liotta, Prof. Johan A. Martens, Prof. Paolo P. Pescarmona and Prof. Michelangelo Gruttadauria

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100446

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An epoxcellent discovery: Multilayered, covalently supported ionic liquid phase (mlc-SILP) materials are successfully prepared and used as catalysts for the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide to epoxides, yielding cyclic carbonates. The materials are highly active, show improved productivity compared to known supported ionic liquid catalysts, and can be easily recovered and reused without loss of activity.

    10. Conversion of Biomass-Derived Levulinate and Formate Esters into γ-Valerolactone over Supported Gold Catalysts (pages 1838–1843)

      Xian-Long Du, Qing-Yuan Bi, Dr. Yong-Mei Liu, Prof. Yong Cao and Prof. Kang-Nian Fan

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reactive extraction: A hydrophobic mixture of butyl levulinate (BL) and formate (BF) esters, formed by the reactive extraction of cellulose-derived levulinic acid and formic acid, separates spontaneously from aqueous H2SO4 solution, which is recovered and recycled. BL is reduced to γ-valerolactone over a supported gold catalyst using BF as the sole source of hydrogen.

    11. Ca-Rich Ca–Al-Oxide, High-Temperature-Stable Sorbents Prepared from Hydrotalcite Precursors: Synthesis, Characterization, and CO2 Capture Capacity (pages 1844–1851)

      Dr. Po-Hsueh Chang, Dr. Yen-Po Chang, Prof. San-Yuan Chen, Dr. Ching-Tsung Yu and Dr. Yau-Pin Chyou

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100357

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ca and Al together forever: Ca-rich Ca–Al–O oxides, with Ca2+/Al3+ ratios of 1:1, 3:1, 5:1, and 7:1, are prepared by using hydrothermal decomposition of coprecipitated hydrotalcite-like Ca–Al–CO3 precursors. We demonstrate that these Ca–Al–O sorbents are suitable for long-term cyclic operation for high-temperature CO2 adsorption at 500–700 °C.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 1/2012 (page 1855)

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190052

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION