ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 2

Special Issue: Photocatalysis

February 18, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 2

Pages 153–283

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
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    1. Cover Picture: Chemical, Electrochemical, and Photochemical Catalytic Oxidation of Water to Dioxygen with Mononuclear Ruthenium Complexes (ChemSusChem 2/2011) (page 153)

      Stephan Roeser, Dr. Pau Farràs, Dr. Fernando Bozoglian, Dr. Marta Martínez-Belmonte, Dr. Jordi Benet-Buchholz and Prof. Dr. Antoni Llobet

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190004

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      The front cover of this special issue on Photocatalysis highlights research by Antoni Llobet and co-workers from the Catalan Institute of Chemical Research (ICIQ) in Tarragona (Spain). In their Full Paper on page 197, they report on the oxidation of water to dioxygen with mononuclear ruthenium complexes as catalysts. The oxidation can be induced either chemically, electrochemically, or photochemically; the thorough investigation thus reveals the versatility of these complexes.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
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    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
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    1. Inside Cover: Overall Water Splitting under Visible Light through a Two-Step Photoexcitation between TaON and WO3 in the Presence of an Iodate–Iodide Shuttle Redox Mediator (ChemSusChem 2/2011) (page 154)

      Prof. Ryu Abe , Dr. Masanobu Higashi and Prof. Kazunari Domen

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190005

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      The inside cover of this special issue on Photocalysis is provided by Ryu Abe and coworkers, who demonstrate in a Full Paper on page 228 a two-step photoexcitation between Pt-TaON and Pt(PtO)WO3 in the presence of an iodateiodide (IO3/I) shuttle redox mediator. The combined photocatalytic water-splitting system is investigated under various reaction conditions, using solutions with different pH values or redox mediator concentrations, and the influence of these factors on the overall efficiency is discussed.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
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    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
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      Editorial: A Current Perspective on Photocatalysis (pages 155–157)

      Dr. Etsuko Fujita, Dr. James T. Muckerman and Prof. Kazunari Domen

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100040

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
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    1. You have free access to this content
  5. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
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  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    1. The Water Oxidation Bottleneck in Artificial Photosynthesis: How Can We Get Through It? An Alternative Route Involving a Two-Electron Process (pages 173–179)

      Dr. Haruo Inoue, Dr. Tetsuya Shimada, Youki Kou, Dr. Yu Nabetani, Dr. Dai Masui, Dr. Shinsuke Takagi and Dr. Hiroshi Tachibana

      Version of Record online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000385

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      Two-lane highway: If 80 chromophores harvest 80 photons within 1 second under the ordinary photon flux-density of sunlight, harvesting 4 photons requires 30 milliseconds. Accordingly, four-electron water oxidation requires a system of storing and maintaining reactive states that survives for 30 milliseconds. Two-electron conversion induced by one photon would be an alternative route through the water oxidation bottleneck.

  7. Communication

    1. Top of page
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    1. Remarkable Improvement of the Photocatalytic Activity of Ga2O3 Towards the Overall Splitting of H2O (pages 181–184)

      Dr. Yoshihisa Sakata, Yuta Matsuda, Takaki Nakagawa, Ryo Yasunaga, Prof. Hayao Imamura and Dr. Kentaro Teramura

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000258

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      Zinc-doped Ga2O3, in combination with a RhyCr2−yO3 co-catalyst shows a remarkably high photocatalytic activity towards the overall splitting of H2O. Several combinations of co-catalyst, dopant, and gallium oxide are characterized and tested, and an activity of 21.0 mmol h−1 H2 and 10.5 mmol h−1 O2 is achieved.

  8. Full Papers

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    1. Improved Niobate Nanoscroll Photocatalysts for Partial Water Splitting (pages 185–190)

      Troy K. Townsend, Erwin M. Sabio, Prof. Nigel D. Browning and Prof. Frank E. Osterloh

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000377

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      Niobate nanoscrolls can be extended with Pt and IrOx nanoparticle co-catalysts to produce improved catalysts for photochemical H2 evolution from aqueous methanol. The activity of the catalysts for water oxidation is limited by the formation of surface peroxides, even in the presence of the co-catalysts.

    2. Electrocatalytic Carbon Dioxide Activation: The Rate-Determining Step of Pyridinium-Catalyzed CO2 Reduction (pages 191–196)

      Dr. Amanda J. Morris, Robert T. McGibbon and Prof. Andrew B. Bocarsly

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000379

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      Reverse combustion: A cyclic voltammetry investigation into the rate-determining step (r.d.s) in the efficient electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 by pyridinium is described. The data obtained supports the formation of a carbamate-like radical as the key reaction intermediate in a process that is first-order in both CO2 and pyridinium up to a pyridinium concentration of 8 mM.

    3. Chemical, Electrochemical, and Photochemical Catalytic Oxidation of Water to Dioxygen with Mononuclear Ruthenium Complexes (pages 197–207)

      Stephan Roeser, Dr. Pau Farràs, Dr. Fernando Bozoglian, Dr. Marta Martínez-Belmonte, Dr. Jordi Benet-Buchholz and Prof. Dr. Antoni Llobet

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000358

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      The age of aqua-Ru′s: Mononuclear ruthenium-aqua complexes that are capable of acting as water oxidation catalysts following chemical, electrochemical, or photochemical induction are reported. Investigations of their electronic and geometric properties provide a rationale for their performance.

    4. Effects of Distortion of Metal–Oxygen Octahedra on Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Performance of RuO2-Loaded Niobium and Tantalum Phosphate Bronzes (pages 208–215)

      Dr. Hiroshi Nishiyama, Prof. Hisayoshi Kobayashi and Prof. Yasunobu Inoue

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000294

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      Sodium, niobium, and tantalum phosphate bronzes are employed as photocatalysts for water splitting to reveal the effects of the distortion of metal–oxygen octahedra on the photocatalytic performance. Addition of RuO2 as a co-catalyst leads to high, stable activity in the stoichiometric production of H2 and O2 under UV irradiation. The heavy distortion of NbO6 octahedra is shown to play a significant role in the reaction.

    5. Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics Following Laser Flash Photolysis of [Ru(bpy)2((4,4′-PO3H2)2bpy)]2+ in TiO2 Nanoparticle Films in Aqueous Environments (pages 216–227)

      Dr. M. Kyle Brennaman, Dr. Antonio Otávio T. Patrocinio, Dr. Wenjing Song, Dr. Jonah W. Jurss, Dr. Javier J. Concepcion, Dr. Paul G. Hoertz, Dr. Matthew C. Traub, Prof. Neyde Y. Murakami Iha and Prof. Thomas J. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000356

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      Knowledge transfer: Injection and back electron transfer from a ruthenium complex bound to a titania surface is investigated by nanosecond laser flash photolysis, under conditions appropriate for water oxidation catalysis by known single-site water oxidation catalysts. The results are qualitatively consistent with a model involving rate-limiting thermal activation of injected electrons from trap sites to the conduction band or shallow trap sites followed by site-to-site hopping and interfacial electron transfer.

    6. Overall Water Splitting under Visible Light through a Two-Step Photoexcitation between TaON and WO3 in the Presence of an Iodate–Iodide Shuttle Redox Mediator (pages 228–237)

      Prof. Ryu Abe , Dr. Masanobu Higashi and Prof. Kazunari Domen

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000333

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      Overall water splitting under visible light is demonstrated through a two-step photoexcitation between Pt–TaON and Pt(PtO)–WO3 in the presence of an iodate–iodide (IO3/I) shuttle redox mediator. The efficiency is significantly affected by the concentration of iodide ions (I), the pH of the solution, and the physicochemical properties of the platinum cocatalyst.

    7. CeIV- and Light-Driven Water Oxidation by [Ru(terpy)(pic)3]2+ Analogues: Catalytic and Mechanistic Studies (pages 238–244)

      Lele Duan, Dr. Yunhua Xu, Lianpeng Tong and Prof. Licheng Sun

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000313

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      RuN6versus RuN5(OH2): Is RuN5(OH2) the real water oxidation catalyst in RuN6-based catalytic systems? The isolated trans-[Ru(terpy)(pic)2(OH2)]2+ shows much better catalytic activity than [Ru(terpy)(pic)3]2+ analogues in both CeIV- and light-driven water oxidation.

    8. Water Splitting over New Niobate Photocatalysts with Tungsten-Bronze-Type Structure and Effect of Transition Metal-Doping (pages 245–251)

      Dr. Yugo Miseki and Prof. Akihiko Kudo

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000180

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      Tungsten-bronze twister: KM2Nb5O15 (M=Sr and Ba) and K2LnNb5O15 (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, and Sm) with tungsten bronze-type structure have arisen as new photocatalysts for water splitting. The structural anisotropy derived from the cation ordering in the MO12 and MO15 sites in the crystal structure affect the photocatalytic activities for water splitting.

    9. A Structurally Diverse RuII,PtII Tetrametallic Motif for Photoinitiated Electron Collection and Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production (pages 252–261)

      Jessica D. Knoll, Dr. Shamindri M. Arachchige and Dr. Karen J. Brewer

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000173

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      A structurally diverse supramolecular complex that couples light absorbers to a reactive metal through polyazine bridging ligands possesses an emissive 3MLCT excited state that provides a probe into its unique photophysical processes. The new architecture functions in photoinitiated electron collection and reduces water to hydrogen with high turnover.

    10. Photoreduction of Water by using Modified CuInS2 Electrodes (pages 262–268)

      Prof. Shigeru Ikeda, Takayuki Nakamura, Sun Min Lee, Tetsuro Yagi, Dr. Takashi Harada, Dr. Tsutomu Minegishi and Prof. Michio Matsumura

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000169

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      Heterojunctions consisting of a p-type CuInS2 film and n-type buffer layers such as CdS and ZnS are fabricated by solution-based techniques. By loading Pt deposits on the n-type layers, these thin films work as efficient photocathodes for water photolysis to produce hydrogen.

    11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of a Doped Mn-Cd-S Solid Solution as a Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalyst for H2 Evolution (pages 269–273)

      Dr. Keita Ikeue, Satoshi Shiiba and Prof. Masato Machida

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000166

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      Solid results: A solid solution with composition Ni0.01Mn0.56Cd0.43S shows a high rate of H2 evolution, ca. 1 mmol h−1, in the presence of a Pt co-catalyst and sacrificial reagents (Na2S and Na2SO3) under visible-light irradiation. The apparent quantum yield measured at λ=420 nm reaches 25 %.

    12. Synthesis of Transition Metal-Modified Carbon Nitride Polymers for Selective Hydrocarbon Oxidation (pages 274–281)

      Dr. Zhengxin Ding, Xiufang Chen, Prof. Markus Antonietti and Prof. Xinchen Wang

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000149

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      Modification of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) photocatalyst with transition metals is achieved with a simple soft-chemical approach using dicyandiamide and metal chloride as precursors. Fe- and Cu-modified carbon nitrides are shown to be active for the hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with H2O2, whereas Co- and Fe-modified samples are shown to be active for the epoxidation of styrene with O2.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemSusChem 3/2011 (page 283)

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190008

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