ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 3

March 21, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 3

Pages 285–415

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Green and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis Using Flow Microreactors / Continuous Synthesis of tert-Butyl Peroxypivalate using a Single-Channel Microreactor Equipped with Orifices as Emulsification Units / Heterogeneous Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactions in Continuous-Flow Reactors (ChemSusChem 3/2011) (page 285)

      Prof. Jun-ichi Yoshida, Heejin Kim, Dr. Aiichiro Nagaki, Tobias Illg, Prof. Dr. Volker Hessel, Dr. Patrick Löb, Prof. Dr. Jaap C. Schouten, Muhammad Irfan, Dr. Toma N. Glasnov and Prof. Dr. C. Oliver Kappe

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190009

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      The front cover showcases the use of flow microreactors for green and sustainable chemical synthesis, described in the Concept paper by Jun-ichi Yoshida et al. (Kyoto University) on page 331. In microreactors, fast mixing based on short diffusion paths leads to a higher product selectivity and, hence, less waste. Short residence times enable flow microreactors to perform reactions that involve highly unstable intermediates at ambient temperatures, avoiding cryogenic conditions and minimizing the energy required for cooling. Precise residence time control avoids the use of auxiliary substances such as protecting groups, enabling straightforward syntheses with good atom economy and fewer reaction steps. Finally, microreactor synthesis enables on-demand and on-site synthesis, requiring less energy for transportation and easy recycling of substances. This Concept paper, and the paper on the synthesis of tert-butyl peroxypivalate in a single-channel microreactor from the groups of Hessel and Schouten (p. 392), was invited to demonstrate the sustainable chemistry merits of using flow reactors. The editorial office acknowledges Prof. C. Oliver Kappe for his efforts in promoting the use of flow chemistry to achieve sustainability, by inviting these contributions and by enriching this issue with an excellent Review on catalytic hydrogenation in flow reactors (p. 300).

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Polyaniline-Based Conducting Polymer Compositions with a High Work Function for Hole-Injection Layers in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes: Formation of Ohmic Contacts (ChemSusChem 3/2011) (page 286)

      Mi-Ri Choi, Seong-Hoon Woo, Tae-Hee Han, Kyung-Geun Lim, Sung-Yong Min, Won Min Yun, Dr. Oh Kwan Kwon, Prof. Chan Eon Park, Kwan-Do Kim, Dr. Hoon-Kyu Shin, Dr. Myeong-Suk Kim, Dr. Taeyong Noh, Prof. Jong Hyeok Park, Kyoung-Hwan Shin, Jyongsik Jang and Prof. Tae-Woo Lee

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190010

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      On the inside cover, Tae-Woo Lee et al. provide a stunning visualization of their work on organic light-emitting diodes. In their Full Paper on page 363, they report their research on polyaniline-based conducting polymers as hole-injection layers. Layers made from this materials greatly improve the hole-injection and current efficiency of the diodes by forming a near-Ohmic contact.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 3/2011 (pages 287–293)

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190011

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 3/2011 (pages 296–298)

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190012

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Heterogeneous Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactions in Continuous-Flow Reactors (pages 300–316)

      Muhammad Irfan, Dr. Toma N. Glasnov and Prof. Dr. C. Oliver Kappe

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000354

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      Gas–liquid–solid interplay: Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions under continuous-flow conditions offer significant benefits when it comes to sustainability, compared to batch processes. These are related to the unique gas–liquid–solid triphasic reaction conditions present in these systems. In this Review recent developments in continuous-flow heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions using molecular hydrogen are summarized.

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Chemical Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles Using Amine–Boranes (pages 317–324)

      Dr. Suresh Babu Kalidindi, Udishnu Sanyal and Prof. Balaji R. Jagirdar

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000318

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      Ça va B N, merci! Development of new large-scale syntheses for monodisperse metal nanoparticles leading towards a pathway of sustainability is an attractive prospect. Amine–boranes have recently been explored as reducing agents for the synthesis of monodisperse metal nanoparticles in solution as well as in the solid state. Research in this area, which has undergone explosive growth, is discussed in this Minireview.

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Dye-Functionalized Polymerization Catalysts Applied to the Coloration of Textiles (pages 325–326)

      Prof. Dr. Frieder Jäkle

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000363

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      Coloration Street: A recent report on a highly effective and sustainable method for the coloration of polylactide-based textiles is highlighted. In this new approach chromophoric aluminum chelates play a dual role: they act as catalysts and at the same time facilitate covalent attachment of the chromophore to the polymer chain ends.

    2. Recent Developments in the Biotechnological Production of Hydrocarbons: Paving the Way for Bio-Based Platform Chemicals (pages 327–329)

      Dr. Pablo Domínguez de María

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000306

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      Petrochemical-free commodities: Recent developments in the biosynthetic production of different hydrocarbons by engineered microorganisms offer further examples of how white biotechnology can provide chemicals and biofuels in a sustainable manner by coupling natural cycles or de novo-designed metabolic routes with industrial interests. Non-edible and cheap lignocellulosic residues are a renewable feedstock to secure the sustainability of the process.

  8. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Green and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis Using Flow Microreactors (pages 331–340)

      Prof. Jun-ichi Yoshida, Heejin Kim and Dr. Aiichiro Nagaki

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000271

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      Flow microreactors can contribute to green and sustainable chemical synthesis and production by improving product selectivity and so giving less waste, avoiding energy-consuming cryogenic cooling, and protecting-group-free synthesis to improve atom and step economy. Microreactors also enable on-demand and on-site synthesis, which leads to less energy for transportation and easy recycling of substances.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. V2O5/Ce0.6Zr0.4O2-Al2O3 as an Efficient Catalyst for the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Ethylbenzene with Carbon Dioxide (pages 341–345)

      Prof. Zhong-Wen Liu, Chan Wang, Prof. Wei-Bin Fan, Prof. Zhao-Tie Liu, Qing-Qing Hao, Xu Long, Prof. Jian Lu, Prof. Jian-Guo Wang, Prof. Zhang-Feng Qin and Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000351

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      V2O5impregnated onto Ce0.6Zr0.4O2-Al2O3 is a highly active and stable catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with CO2. For the first time, highly dispersed vanadium species stabilized with CeO2 and/or CeZrO2 solid solution and deposited carbonaceous materials are revealed to be main factors contributing to its high stability.

    2. Desulfurization of Hydrocarbons by Electron Transfer Oxidative Polymerization of Heteroaromatic Sulfides Catalyzed by H5PV2Mo10O40 Polyoxometalate (pages 346–348)

      Dr. Alexander M. Khenkin and Prof. Ronny Neumann

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000402

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      Gone in 7200 Seconds: Heteroaromatic thiophene derivatives, refractory to hydrodesulfurization, are removed from hydrocarbons by oxidative polymerization over H5PV2Mo10O40/SiO2 as a recyclable, heterogeneous catalyst. The levels of sulfur-containing compounds reach sub-ppm to nondetectable levels, as analyzed by gas chromatography with a flame photometric detector.

    3. Direct Catalytic Synthesis of 5-Methylfurfural from Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates (pages 349–352)

      Dr. Weiran Yang and Prof. Ayusman Sen

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000369

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      5-Methylfurfural (MF), an important chemical intermediate, can be obtained directly from carbohydrates using a metal catalyst, hydroiodic acid, and hydrogen in a biphasic reaction procedure. The catalyst system is robust and can be recycled without loss of reactivity.

    4. Conversion of Fructose into 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural in Sulfolane (pages 353–356)

      Benjamin R. Caes and Prof. Ronald T. Raines

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000397

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      Sulfolane, an industrial solvent, allows for the efficient conversion of fructose into 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), a key platform chemical. Yields of ≥90 % are attainable with catalytic HBr in 1 h at 100 °C. The use of an inexpensive catalyst at a low concentration, low temperature, and short reaction time makes the process amenable for large-scale access to HMF.

    5. Reactive Extraction of Levulinate Esters and Conversion to γ-Valerolactone for Production of Liquid Fuels (pages 357–361)

      Elif I. Gürbüz, Dr. David Martin Alonso, Dr. Jesse Q. Bond and Prof. James A. Dumesic

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000396

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      Reactive extraction of cellulose-derived levulinic and formic acids with butene is utilized to obtain levulinate and formate esters, thereby allowing for recovery and recycle of H2SO4. The esters are converted over a dual-catalyst-bed system to GVL and 2-butanol, followed by production of butene to be recycled for reactive extraction and to be converted to liquid fuels by oligomerization.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Polyaniline-Based Conducting Polymer Compositions with a High Work Function for Hole-Injection Layers in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes: Formation of Ohmic Contacts (pages 363–368)

      Mi-Ri Choi, Seong-Hoon Woo, Tae-Hee Han, Kyung-Geun Lim, Sung-Yong Min, Won Min Yun, Dr. Oh Kwan Kwon, Prof. Chan Eon Park, Kwan-Do Kim, Dr. Hoon-Kyu Shin, Dr. Myeong-Suk Kim, Dr. Taeyong Noh, Prof. Jong Hyeok Park, Kyoung-Hwan Shin, Jyongsik Jang and Prof. Tae-Woo Lee

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000338

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      The perfect blend: The current efficiencies of small-molecule organic light-emitting diodes can be improved by using a blend composed of a polyaniline-based conducting polymer (PANI:PSS) and a perfluorinated ionomer (PFI) in the hole-injection layer produced by a single spin-coating process (see figure).

    2. Lignin Solubilization and Aqueous Phase Reforming for the Production of Aromatic Chemicals and Hydrogen (pages 369–378)

      Dr. Joseph Zakzeski and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000299

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      There′s an APR for that: The dissolution and aqueous phase reforming of lignin, including kraft, soda, alcell, and sugarcane bagasse, is reported for the first time under mild conditions for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen. The monomeric aromatic compounds and overall lignin conversion based on these isolated yields varies from 10–15 %, based on the lignin sample

    3. Aminosilica Materials as Adsorbents for the Selective Removal of Aldehydes and Ketones from Simulated Bio-Oil (pages 379–385)

      Jeffrey H. Drese, Anne D. Talley and Prof. Christopher W. Jones

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000347

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      Oil's well that ends well: Solid aminosilica adsorbents are applied for the removal of reactive aldehydes and ketones from fast-pyrolysis bio-oil mixtures. For instance, surface-bound imines are formed after the adsorption of furfural, hexanal, and syringaldehyde by a 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane-functionalized pore-expanded SBA-15 mesoporous silica.

    4. Soybean Oil–Isosorbide-Based Waterborne Polyurethane–Urea Dispersions (pages 386–391)

      Ying Xia and Prof. Richard C. Larock

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000411

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      Sorbide Inc.: A series of soybean oil-based amide diol-isosorbide waterborne polyurethane-urea dispersions are prepared, with isosorbide amounts ranging from 0 to 20 wt % of the total diol content. The thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting films are improved significantly with the incorporation of isosorbide, indicating a promising route to utilize isosorbide and a soybean oil-based amide diol for the preparation of high-performance polyurethane-urea coatings.

    5. Continuous Synthesis of tert-Butyl Peroxypivalate using a Single-Channel Microreactor Equipped with Orifices as Emulsification Units (pages 392–398)

      Tobias Illg, Prof. Dr. Volker Hessel, Dr. Patrick Löb and Prof. Dr. Jaap C. Schouten

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000368

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      The continuous two-step synthesis of tert-butyl peroxypivalate using a single-channel microreactor equipped with orifices for interfacial area renewal. The continuous deprotonation of tert-butyl hydroperoxide is discussed as well as the influence of flow velocity and energy density to create an emulsion for the second reaction step.The shortening of process times, unconventional reaction temperatures, and an approximate benchmark are also presented.

    6. Oxidative Desulfurization of Fuels Catalyzed by Fenton-Like Ionic Liquids at Room Temperature (pages 399–403)

      Yunqing Jiang, Dr. Wenshuai Zhu, Prof. Huaming Li, Dr. Sheng Yin, Dr. Hua Liu and Dr. Qingjie Xie

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000251

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      Oxidation of the sulfur-containing compounds benzothiophene (BT), dibenzothiophene (DBT), and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT) has been studied in a desulfurization system composed of model oil, hydrogen peroxide, and different types of ionic liquids. Deep desulfurization of DBT in the Fenton-like ionic liquid [(C8H17)3CH3N]Cl/FeCl3 reaches 97.9 % after 1 h at 25 °C.

    7. Reactive Adsorption of NO2 at Ambient Conditions on Iron-Containing Polymer-Based Porous Carbons (pages 404–412)

      Dr. Svetlana Bashkova and Prof. Teresa J. Bandosz

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000296

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      High amounts of small, well-dispersed iron particles in the form of Fe2O3, FeS, and FeSO4 on the surface of porous carbon enhance the reduction process of NO2 to NO and result in a higher NO2 capacity of such carbon. The participation of these iron species in the adsorption of NO2 occurs via reduction/retention processes and results in the formation of iron nitrates and Fe2O3[BOND]NOx type of species.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 4/2011 (page 415)

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190013

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