ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 6

June 20, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 6

Pages 669–807

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Catalytic Production of Conjugated Fatty Acids and Oils / Design of Ru–Zeolites for Hydrogen-Free Production of Conjugated Linoleic Acids (ChemSusChem 6/2011) (page 669)

      Dr. An Philippaerts, Steven Goossens, Prof. Pierre A. Jacobs, Prof. Bert F. Sels, An Philippaerts, Steven Goossens, Walter Vermandel, Prof. Moniek Tromp, Dr. Stuart Turner, Jan Geboers, Prof. Gustaaf Van Tendeloo, Prof. Pierre A. Jacobs and Prof. Bert Sels

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190022

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      The cover picture illustrates the conjugation of oils rich in linoleic acid, such as safflower oil. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated oils are excellent drying agents in products such as paints, varnishes, and inks because of their highly reactive double bonds, while they recently have also gained attention as building blocks of bioplastics. An extensive Review on the production of CLAs according to various bio-, chemo-, and photocatalytic routes is presented by Bert Sels and co-workers on p. 684. In comparison to the state-of-the-art, the same group reports the development of a very active and selective heterogeneous catalytic system, which can be used in a hydrogen-free environment, in a Full Paper by Philippaerts et al. on p. 757. The solid catalyst contains Cs cations and ultrasmall Ru clusters in the open pore structure of a highly siliceous USY zeolite.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Bisquinoxaline-Fused Porphyrins for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (ChemSusChem 6/2011) (page 670)

      Prof. Hiroshi Imahori, Hiroaki Iijima, Hironobu Hayashi, Yuuki Toude, Prof. Tomokazu Umeyama, Prof. Yoshihiro Matano and Seigo Ito

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190023

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      This inside cover picture shows the structure of a novel bisquinoxaline-fused porphyrin (ZnPBQ) for dye-sensitized solar cells, described in the Full Paper by Hiroshi Imahori et al. (Kyoto University) on p. 797. The information on improved light-harvesting properties and cell performances is of fundamental importance for the molecular design of highly efficient porphyrin-sensitized solar cells based on the research concept of Prof. Imahori's laboratory: unsymmetrical π-elongation of porphyrins.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 6/2011 (pages 671–676)

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190024

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 6/2011 (pages 680–682)

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190025

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Catalytic Production of Conjugated Fatty Acids and Oils (pages 684–702)

      Dr. An Philippaerts, Steven Goossens, Prof. Pierre A. Jacobs and Prof. Bert F. Sels

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100086

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      Conjugated vegetable oils are attractive bioresources for use in paints, inks, coatings, and plastics as well as ingredients for functional foods. Technologies for the conjugation of linoleic acid and vegetable oils using (bio)catalysts (enzymes, homogeneous, and heterogeneous catalysts) are discussed in this Review. Special attention is given to the conjugated linoleic acids productivity and their isomer distribution.

    2. Recent Advances in Vegetable Oil-Based Polyurethanes (pages 703–717)

      Dr. Daniel P. Pfister, Ying Xia and Prof. Richard C. Larock

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000378

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      Polyurethanes are among the most versatile polymers because of the wide range of monomers, particularly diols or polyols, that can be utilized in their synthesis. Over the past several years, increasing attention has been given to the preparation of vegetable oil-based monomers, which have been used to produce a broad spectrum of polyurethane materials, from flexible foams to ductile and rigid plastics. This Review focuses on the most recent advances made in the production of polyurethane materials from vegetable oils.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Acid-Catalyzed Etherification of Glycerol with Long-Alkyl-Chain Alcohols (pages 719–722)

      Dr. Pierrick Gaudin, Dr. Roland Jacquot, Dr. Philippe Marion, Prof. Yannick Pouilloux and Dr. François Jérôme

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100129

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      Rubbing the right way: The direct etherification of glycerol with long-chain alcohols typically suffers from poor contact between the reaction phases. A dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid catalyst enables a better contact between the glycerol and alcohol phases, enhancing the yield of monoalkyl glyceryl ethers and offering a direct route for the synthesis of these surfactants.

    2. Conversion of Mono- and Disaccharides to Ethyl Levulinate and Ethyl Pyranoside with Sulfonic Acid-Functionalized Ionic Liquids (pages 723–726)

      Dr. Shunmugavel Saravanamurugan, Dr. Olivier Nguyen Van Buu and Prof. Anders Riisager

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100137

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      Value-added chemicals from sugars: Sulfonic acid-functionalized ionic liquids are attractive and promising catalyst for the conversion of sugars to ethyl levulinate and ethyl-D-glucopyranoside in ethanol. These task-specific ionic liquids can be recovered and reused in at least three cycles in the conversion of fructose to ethyl levulinate without any loss of activity.

    3. A Full-Spectrum Visible-Light-Responsive Organophotocatalyst Film for Removal of Trimethylamine (pages 727–730)

      Prof. Keiji Nagai , Prof. Toshiyuki Abe, Yumi Kaneyasu, Yuzuri Yasuda , Ichirou Kimishima, Prof. Tokomazu Iyoda and Hiroshi Imaya

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100064

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      A visible-light-responsive photocatalyst membrane, comprising only organic materials, degrades trimethylamine, a typical volatile organic compound, to CO2 with a quantum efficiency of ca. 40 %. The organic materials are phthalocyanine (p-type) and a perylene derivative (n-type), coated onto a Nafion membrane that serves as mechanical support and adsorbent material. The membrane uses natural light and ambient oxygen.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Fine-Tuning of Triarylamine-Based Photosensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 731–736)

      Dr. Céline Olivier, Dr. Frédéric Sauvage, Dr. Laurent Ducasse, Dr. Frédéric Castet, Prof. Michael Grätzel and Prof. Thierry Toupance

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100031

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      Power naph: “push-pull” dyes based on triarylamine electron donors, and bearing one to three naphthyl units in place of phenyl rings, are synthesized. The dye containing a naphthyl attached to the π-conjugated linker and phenyl rings on the outside has the highest molar extinction coefficient and energy conversion efficiency of the series while also exhibiting a higher electron lifetime.

    2. Removal of Organic Compounds from Water by Using a Gold Nanoparticle–Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Nanocomposite Foam (pages 737–743)

      Ritu Gupta and Prof. Giridhar U. Kulkarni

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000410

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      Suck it up! A foam composed of a composite of gold nanoparticles and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is used to remove contaminants such as odorous molecules, solvents, and oil spills from water (see picture). The AuPDMS foam can be regenerated by heating in air with no loss of activity.

    3. One-Step Preparation of Efficient and Reusable SO42−/ZrO2-Based Hybrid Solid Catalysts Functionalized by Alkyl-Bridged Organosilica Moieties for Biodiesel Production (pages 744–756)

      Dr. Wei Li, Dr. Fengyan Ma, Fang Su, Dr. Ling Ma, Dr. Shengqu Zhang and Prof. Dr. Yihang Guo

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100022

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      Hybrid control: Mesostructured SO42−/ZrO2[BOND]SiO2(R) (R=CH2CH2 or C6H4) materials with controllable structural ordering and pore geometries are successfully developed by designing suitable preparation routes and they are demonstrated as promising heterogeneous acid catalyst candidates for biodiesel production from low-quality biomass under mild conditions (see figure).

    4. Design of Ru–Zeolites for Hydrogen-Free Production of Conjugated Linoleic Acids (pages 757–767)

      An Philippaerts, Steven Goossens, Walter Vermandel, Prof. Moniek Tromp, Dr. Stuart Turner, Jan Geboers, Prof. Gustaaf Van Tendeloo, Prof. Pierre A. Jacobs and Prof. Bert F. Sels

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100015

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      Edible addition: Conjugated vegetable oils are attractive substrates in drying oils, paints and bioplastics. Moreover, some conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are associated with beneficial health effects. A highly dispersed Ru-USY zeolite catalyst is very active and selective for the production of CLA without the use of a hydrogen source.

    5. Catalytic Conversion of Dihydroxyacetone to Lactic Acid Using Metal Salts in Water (pages 768–777)

      Carolus B. Rasrendra, Boy A. Fachri, Dr.  I. Gusti B. N. Makertihartha, Dr. Sanggono Adisasmito and Prof. Dr. Hero J. Heeres

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000457

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      Just add salt: The potential application of metal salts as catalysts for the conversion of trioses (dihydroxyacetone and glyceraldehyde) into lactic acid in water has been explored (see scheme). Aluminium and chromium were identified as the most promising cations and lactic acid yields of up to 93 mol % were obtained under mild reaction conditions (120–180 °C).

    6. Structure and Catalysis of Cellulose-Derived Amorphous Carbon Bearing SO3H Groups (pages 778–784)

      Kiichi Fukuhara, Dr. Kiyotaka Nakajima, Dr. Masaaki Kitano, Dr. Hideki Kato, Dr. Shigenobu Hayashi and Dr. Michikazu Hara

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000431

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      Sulfuric acid is in for it: A cellulose-derived and carbon-based solid acid, prepared by using mild carbonization temperatures (approximately 723 K), exhibits high catalytic performance for hydrophilic acid-catalyzed reactions, because a poorly cross-linked carbon structure allows for reactant molecules to smoothly access the SO3H groups bonded to the carbon sheets.

    7. Synthesis of Biobased Succinonitrile from Glutamic Acid and Glutamine (pages 785–791)

      Tijs M. Lammens, Dr. Jérôme Le Nôtre, Dr. Maurice C. R. Franssen, Dr. Elinor L. Scott and Prof. Johan P. M. Sanders

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100030

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      Succinonitrile is a precursor for the industrial production of polyamides. This study deals with the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are present in many plant proteins. The intermediate 3-cyanopropanoic amide can be synthesized from glutamic acid and glutamine, and it can be converted into succinonitrile, by applying a palladium(II)-catalyzed reaction, with a selectivity close to 100 %.

    8. Real-Time Monitoring of Hydrogen Peroxide Consumption in an Oxidation Reaction in Molecular Solvent and Ionic Liquids by a Hydrogen Peroxide Electrochemical Sensor (pages 792–796)

      Daniela Sordi, Dr. Fabiana Arduini, Prof. Valeria Conte, Prof. Danila Moscone and Prof. Giuseppe Palleschi

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000386

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      Sustained oxidation: An efficient electrochemical protocol to monitor hydrogen peroxide consumption during vanadium-catalyzed oxidation, by using screen-printed electrodes modified with Prussian blue (PB), is presented (see figure).

    9. Bisquinoxaline-Fused Porphyrins for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 797–805)

      Prof. Hiroshi Imahori, Hiroaki Iijima, Hironobu Hayashi, Yuuki Toude, Prof. Tomokazu Umeyama, Prof. Yoshihiro Matano and Seigo Ito

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100029

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      Extended efficiency: Bisquinoxaline-fused porphyrin is synthesized and the photovoltaic properties are compared with those of monoquinoxaline-fused and nonfused porphyrins. The bisquinoxaline-fused porphyrin shows improved light-harvesting properties compared with the reference porphyrins (see figure).

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 7/2011 (page 807)

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190026

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