ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 7

Special Issue: Carbon Nanotubes

July 18, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 7

Pages 809–983

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: (ChemSusChem 7/2011) (page 809)

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known since 1976 and single-walled carbon nanotubes since 1993. However, after Sumio Ijjima from the Japanese Electronic Company NEC published his electron microscopy observation of “Helical microtubules of graphitic carbon” in Nature in 1991, a new research area was born. Soon after the report in Nature, CNTs were found to have excellent mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Since then, they have been widely used in materials science, catalysis, and energy research. This special issue contains Reviews, a Minireview, a Concept, Communications, and Full Papers on all aspects of CNT research, especially the use of CNTs in sustainable chemistry, renewable energy, and their synthesis and production.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      20 Years of Carbon Nanotubes (pages 811–813)

      Dr. Dang Sheng Su 

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100330

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 7/2011 (pages 814–818)

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190028

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Recent Progress on the Growth Mechanism of Carbon Nanotubes: A Review (pages 824–847)

      Dr. Jean-Philippe Tessonnier and Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100175

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      CNT Growth: the latest progress in carbon nanotube synthesis is reported and analyzed in this Review. We focus in particular on the dynamic nature of the metal active phase and its evolution when interacting with both the catalyst support or matrix, and the gas phase. A different light is shed on parameters crucial for large-scale production and for controlling their chirality.

    2. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Sensors based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Life Sciences Applications (pages 848–863)

      Ardemis A. Boghossian , Jingqing Zhang , Dr. Paul W. Barone, Nigel F. Reuel, Dr. Jong-Ho Kim, Dr. Daniel A. Heller, Dr. Jin-Ho Ahn, Andrew J. Hilmer, Alina Rwei, Jyoti R. Arkalgud, Cathy T. Zhang and Prof. Michael S. Strano

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100070

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes are ideal for biological systems. They exhibit fluorescence in the near-infrared range of 820–1600 nm, where biological tissue absorption is often minimal, and have an inherent photostability. Both properties are desirable for in vitro and in vivo sensors. This Review describes recent developments in this area over the past few years, and the design rules for detecting various analytes.

    3. Carbon Nanotube Mass Production: Principles and Processes (pages 864–889)

      Dr. Qiang Zhang, Jia-Qi Huang, Meng-Qiang Zhao, Prof. Wei-Zhong Qian and Prof. Fei Wei

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100177

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotube industry: The mass production of carbon nanotubes involves both self-assembly of carbon atoms at the nanoscopic scale and tonne-scale continuous production, a macroscopic process. The basic chemistry and engineering science of carbon nanotube production, including growth and agglomeration mechanisms, reactor design, and process intensification parameters, are reviewed to provide an overview of production and commercialization.

    4. Strategy for Carrier Control in Carbon Nanotube Transistors (pages 890–904)

      Dr. Woo Jong Yu and Prof. Young Hee Lee

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000412

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Have it the carriers way: We discuss various approaches for the doping of operating carbon nanotube transistors: i) impurity doping, ii) chemical doping, iii) control of metal work function, iv) electrostatic doping, and v) ambipolarity. Advantages and drawbacks of these approaches are discussed extensively in the text.

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. A Brief Summary of Carbon Nanotubes Science and Technology: A Health and Safety Perspective (pages 905–911)

      Dr. Peter Wick, Dr. Martin J. D. Clift, Dr. Matthias Rösslein and Prof. Dr. Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The biological effects of carbon nanotubes can be investigated by combining research in biology, chemistry, and physics with occupational safety and materials science, forming an interdisciplinary field. Over the last decade new insights concerning the molecular mechanisms of carbon nanotube–cell interactions have been discovered, and these insights form the basis of this Minireview on the health and safety aspects of carbon nanotubes.

  7. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Carbon Nanotubes for Sustainable Energy Applications (pages 913–925)

      Prof. Gabriele Centi and Prof. Siglinda Perathoner

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotubes are the first and most-successful example of nanomaterials, and play a central role in the development of advanced solutions for sustainable energy applications. This Concept paper describes how the successful application and optimization of CNTs in energy applications requires rational designs, which in turn requires a thorough understanding of which key aspects should be considered in the different applications.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Polythiophene-Assisted Vapor Phase Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube-Supported Rhodium Sulfide as Oxygen Reduction Catalyst for HCl Electrolysis (pages 927–930)

      Chen Jin, Dr. Tharamani Chikka Nagaiah, Dr. Wei Xia, Dr. Michael Bron, Prof. Wolfgang Schuhmann and Prof. Martin Muhler

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000315

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rhodium Drive: Carbon nanotube-supported rhodium sulfide electrocatalysts are prepared by sequential chemical vapor deposition of iron, controlled vapor phase polymerization of thiophene, and finally impregnation of the rhodium precursor and pyrolysis. The electrocatalysts are applied in the oxygen reduction reaction under HCl electrolysis conditions.

    2. Thermostable Natural Rubber with Cellular Structure Using Thin Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 931–934)

      Tomiyoshi Sugiura, Dr. Toru Noguchi, Dr. Hiroyuki Ueki, Dr. Kenichi Niihara, Prof. Kenji Takeuchi, Dr. Cheol-Min Yang, Prof. Takuya Hayashi, Prof. Yoong Ahm Kim and Prof. Morinobu Endo

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000309

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mechanically strong yet flexible natural rubber, thermally stable at 120 °C, is fabricated by a simple approach. Thin multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are found to form a continuous, three-dimensional cellular structure, the result of strong interfacial bonding between the MWNTs and the rubber molecules.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis on Hierarchically Structured Cobalt Nanoparticle/Carbon Nanofiber/Carbon Felt Composites (pages 935–942)

      Sarka Zarubova, Shreyas Rane, Jia Yang, Dr. Yingda Yu, Ye Zhu, Prof. De Chen and Prof. Anders Holmen

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High on Energy: A structured carbon nanofiber/carbon felt composite is used as support material for cobalt nanoparticles, to be used in the (highly exothermic) Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. The material offers improved heat and mass transfer and allows safe handling of immobilized carbon nanofibers.

    2. Carbon Nanotubes as Nanotexturing Agents for High Power Supercapacitors Based on Seaweed Carbons (pages 943–949)

      Dr. Encarnación Raymundo-Piñero, Dr. Martin Cadek, Dr. Mario Wachtler and Prof. François Béguin

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000376

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbonizing oxygen-rich seaweeds in the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) adds several advantages to the electrochemical performance of carbon electrodes. Due to the excellent electrical conductivity of CNTs and the good propagation of ions favored by the presence of opened mesopores, the resistance of the cells is dramatically reduced and the specific power is enhance (see figure).

    3. Hydrogenation of p-Chloronitrobenzene over Nanostructured-Carbon-Supported Ruthenium Catalysts (pages 950–956)

      Mustapha Oubenali, Giuditta Vanucci, Dr. Bruno Machado, Dr. Mohammed Kacimi, Prof. Dr. Mahfoud Ziyad, Dr. Joaquim Faria, Dr. Anna Raspolli-Galetti and Prof. Dr. Philippe Serp

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000335

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers act as supports for ruthenium nanoparticles in the hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene to selectively produce p-chloroaniline. The preparation of well-dispersed ruthenium catalysts from a [Ru3(CO)12] precursor requires activation of the purified supports by nitric acid oxidation. The catalytic activity is one order of magnitude higher than that of a commercial Ru/Al2O3 catalyst.

    4. A Quantitative Electron Tomography Study of Ruthenium Particles on the Interior and Exterior Surfaces of Carbon Nanotubes (pages 957–963)

      Dr. Heiner Friedrich, Shujing Guo, Dr. Petra E. de Jongh, Prof. Dr. Xiulian Pan, Prof. Dr. Xinhe Bao and Prof. Dr. Krijn P. de Jong

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tomo arigato! The efficiency of filling carbon nanotubes by ultrasound-assisted wet impregnation is quantified by electron tomography. The method allows for automated and operator-independent quantification of nanostructured catalysts, contributing to a more rational design of this important class of materials in the future.

    5. Nanostructured Carbon–Metal Oxide Hybrids as Amphiphilic Emulsion Catalysts (pages 964–974)

      Dr. M. Pilar Ruiz, Jimmy Faria, Dr. Min Shen, Santiago Drexler, Teerawit Prasomsri and Prof. Daniel E. Resasco

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000322

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The amphiphilic character of nanostructured carbon supported on metal oxides favors the stabilization of emulsions. At the same time these nanohybrid nanoparticles act as a support for active species to catalyze reactions at the water/oil interface. The conversion and selectivity of these reactions are strongly influenced by the intrinsic properties of the nanohybrids to both stabilize emulsions and anchor the catalytic species.

    6. Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Sub-nanometer Titania Clusters Confined inside Double-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (pages 975–980)

      Hongbo Zhang, Prof. Xiulian Pan, Prof. Jingyue (Jimmy) Liu , Prof. Weizhong Qian, Prof. Fei Wei, Prof. Yuying Huang and Prof. Xinhe Bao

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000324

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Confinement inside double-walled carbon nanotubes does not only provide a novel approach to highly dispersed sub-nanometer titanium oxide clusters but also induces electron transfer from titanium to carbon via interactions. The confined titanium oxide exhibits a catalytic activity in propylene epoxidation eight times higher than the oxide on the outside of the nanotubes.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 8/2011 (page 983)

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190030

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION