ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 9

Special Issue: Carbon Dioxide Recycling

September 19, 2011

Volume 4, Issue 9

Pages 1177–1323

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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    1. Cover Picture: Chemical Technologies for Exploiting and Recycling Carbon Dioxide into the Value Chain (ChemSusChem 9/2011) (page 1177)

      Dr. Martina Peters, Dr. Burkhard Köhler, Dr. Wilhelm Kuckshinrichs, Prof. Walter Leitner, Dr. Peter Markewitz and Dr. Thomas E. Müller

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190035

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      Carbon dioxide, a renewable resource: The cover illustrates the vision of utilizing the greenhouse gas CO2 as feedstock for chemical production. With the implementation of carbon capture technologies, CO2 will become available in vast quantities as an economically attractive resource. On condition that an adequate supply of energy from non-fossil resources for chemical processing is ensured, the use of this CO2 would harvest nature's carbon resources most directly, without the by-pass via biomass or fossil resources and could open up a complementary strategy contributing to a closed anthropogenic carbon cycle. In a Review on page 1216, Leitner and Müller et al. discuss strategies to identify the most interesting products and chemical pathways for the utilization of CO2. The cover image was prepared by Thorsten Groetker (FairyDustInc).

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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    1. Inside Cover: (ChemSusChem 9/2011) (page 1178)

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190036

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      Carbon dioxide, the end product of the combustion of hydrocarbons and biomass, has long been considered an irrelevant waste. However, the scientific and public opinions on CO2 are changing. CO2 emissions have become a concern, and this has prompted political actions aimed at curbing emissions. This Special Issue, guest edited by E. Alessandra Quadrelli and Gabriele Centi, is focused on emerging technologies for large-volume CO2 recycling.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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      Green Carbon Dioxide (pages 1179–1181)

      Dr. Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli and Prof. Gabriele Centi

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100518

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      Large-volume CO2recycling: This special issue of ChemSusChem is dedicated to recent advances in the conversion CO2 into chemicals and fuels, with particular attention to industrial perspectives and large-volume options. Its aim is to provide an overview of the possibilities, new trends, and research areas involved in the chemical utilization of CO2, from both fundamental and applied perspectives.

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 9/2011 (pages 1183–1187)

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190037

  5. News

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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  6. Reviews

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    4. Editorial
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    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
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    1. Carbon Dioxide Recycling: Emerging Large-Scale Technologies with Industrial Potential (pages 1194–1215)

      Dr. Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli, Prof. Gabriele Centi, Dr. Jean-Luc Duplan and Prof. Siglinda Perathoner

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100473

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      Emerging large-scale CO2conversion routes, with an overview of projects and pilot plants that are currently (nearly) at an industrial level are the subject of this Review. These include inorganic mineralization, organic carboxylation, reduction, and biochemical conversion. These developments show the potential of CO2 as a green molecule that enables the sustainable and resource-efficient production of chemicals and energy

    2. Chemical Technologies for Exploiting and Recycling Carbon Dioxide into the Value Chain (pages 1216–1240)

      Dr. Martina Peters, Dr. Burkhard Köhler, Dr. Wilhelm Kuckshinrichs, Prof. Walter Leitner, Dr. Peter Markewitz and Dr. Thomas E. Müller

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000447

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      Curbing carbon: Carbon dioxide is a promising carbon source, with practically unlimited availability for a range of industrially relevant applications. The chemical exploitation of carbon dioxide should aim at adding value and developing better and more-efficient processes with reduced overall carbon footprints. This Review will discuss the connection to carbon capture technologies and provide some general criteria for evaluating the use of carbon dioxide as raw material.

  7. Minireviews

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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    1. Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid Decomposition by Ruthenium Carbonyl Complexes. Tetraruthenium Dodecacarbonyl Tetrahydride as an Active Intermediate (pages 1241–1248)

      Dr. Miklos Czaun, Dr. Alain Goeppert, Robert May, Dr. Ralf Haiges, Prof. Dr. G. K. Surya Prakash and Prof. Dr. George A. Olah

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000446

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      Renewable energy carrier: Carbonylation and hydrido carbonylation of ruthenium halides by formic acid is reviewed. The first preparation of [Ru4(CO)12H4], using formic acid as the exclusive CO and hydride source, and the catalytic activity of [Ru4(CO)12H4] for the decomposition of formic acid to CO2 and H2 are also reported.

    2. Designing Photobioreactors based on Living Cells Immobilized in Silica Gel for Carbon Dioxide Mitigation (pages 1249–1257)

      Dr. Joanna C. Rooke, Dr. Alexandre Léonard , Christophe F. Meunier and Prof. Bao-Lian Su

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000442

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      Do not pass Go: Photosynthesis, nature's renewable energy source, can convert carbon dioxide originating from the combustion of fossil fuels into useful compounds. This Minireview highlights the possibility of designing a photobioreactor based on the immobilization of photosynthetically active unicellular organisms within silica gels.

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
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    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
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    1. Myth or Reality? Fixation of Carbon Dioxide into Complex Organic Matter under Mild Conditions (pages 1259–1263)

      Dr. Rubén Martín and Dr. Arjan W. Kleij 

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100102

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      And mild it is: This Highlight covers the most recent developments in CO2 fixation by homogeneous catalytic methods under mild reactions conditions. A particular focus is given to two main product categories: the formation of carboxylic acids (and derivatives) from sources comprising reactive C[BOND]H bonds, and the integration of CO2 into (functionalized) epoxides giving rise to either cyclic carbonate or poly(carbonate) structures.

  9. Concept

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
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    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
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    10. Concept
    11. Communication
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    1. Can We Afford to Waste Carbon Dioxide? Carbon Dioxide as a Valuable Source of Carbon for the Production of Light Olefins (pages 1265–1273)

      Prof. Gabriele Centi, Dr. Gaetano Iaquaniello and Prof. Siglinda Perathoner

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100313

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      Can we afford to waste CO2? Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) focuses on avoiding the emission of CO2, while carbon capture and recycling (CCR) is focused on using the captured CO2 as a raw material. This Concept paper focuses on the production of light olefins from CO2, and highlights how the use of CO2 for these very important building blocks hinges on developments in other fields of sustainable chemistry, most importantly the production of renewable hydrogen.

  10. Communication

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
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    10. Concept
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    1. Transformation of Nickelalactones to Methyl Acrylate: On the Way to a Catalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide (pages 1275–1279)

      S. Y. Tina Lee, Dr. Mirza Cokoja, Dr. Markus Drees, Dr. Yang Li, Prof. Dr. János Mink, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000445

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      Mu-nick: The methyl iodide-mediated ring opening of nickelalactones, which can be formed by oxidative coupling of carbon dioxide and ethylene at Ni0 complexes, induces β-H elimination, producing methyl acrylate in yields of up to 56 %. This reaction is found to be very sensitive to the ligands coordinated to the central nickel atom.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
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    1. Tailoring Metal–Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture: The Amino Effect (pages 1281–1290)

      Dr. Jenny G. Vitillo, Dr. Marie Savonnet , Dr. Gabriele Ricchiardi and Prof. Silvia Bordiga

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000458

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      Scrubbed away: Quantum mechanics is used as a screening tool to investigate the affinity of different functional groups towards CO2. The calculations explain the large CO2 affinity observed experimentally for 2-amino-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate-based materials by the presence of pairs of [BOND]NH2 groups and not by the direct interaction with isolated [BOND]NH2 groups (see picture).

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      Integration of CO2 Capture and Mineral Carbonation by Using Recyclable Ammonium Salts (pages 1291–1300)

      Xiaolong Wang and Prof. M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000441

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      Breathe out later: A new approach to capture and store CO2 by mineral carbonation using recyclable ammonium salts is studied. The mass ratio of Mg/NH4HCO3/NH3 is the key factor that controls carbonation (see image). The use of NH4HCO3 as the source of CO2 can avoid desorption and compression of CO2.

    3. The Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formate/Formic Acid: Engineering and Economic Feasibility (pages 1301–1310)

      Dr. Arun S. Agarwal, Dr. Yumei Zhai, Dr. Davion Hill and Dr. Narasi Sridhar

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100220

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      Formic acid and formate salts produced from carbon dioxide are commercially attractive end products for the energy, transportation, pharmaceutical, and other industries. Recent progress towards a commercially viable electrochemical route to reduce carbon dioxide into formic acid is described. A value chain analyses of two different production scenarios is compared to carbon capture and geological sequestration.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: The Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formate/Formic Acid: Engineering and Economic Feasibility

      Vol. 4, Issue 12, 1705, Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011

    4. RuII-Mediated Hydrogen Transfer from Aqueous Glycerol to CO2: From Waste to Value-Added Products (pages 1311–1315)

      Prof. Angela Dibenedetto, Paolo Stufano, Dr. Francesco Nocito and Prof. Michele Aresta

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000434

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      In the face of wastefulness: Aqueous glycerol is used as a hydrogen source for the reduction of CO2 to formic acid. In the presence of RuCl2(PPh3)3, glycerol behaves as a four-hydrogen transfer agent affording glycolic acid.

    5. Tin-Based Mesoporous Silica for the Conversion of CO2 into Dimethyl Carbonate (pages 1316–1322)

      Dr. Danielle Ballivet-Tkatchenko, Prof. Dr. Frédéric Bernard, Dr. Frédéric Demoisson, Dr. Laurent Plasseraud and Dr. Sreevardhan Reddy Sanapureddy

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100034

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      Well-done SBA-15! Post-synthesis modification of SBA-15 with di-n-butyldimethoxystannane leads to catalytic materials for the selective conversion of CO2 and methanol into dimethyl carbonate. The unexpected performance and resistance to leaching are assigned to the specific environment in the mesopores.

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 10/2011 (page 1323)

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201190039

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