ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 1

Special Issue: Green Nanocatalysis

January 9, 2012

Volume 5, Issue 1

Pages 1–211

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    10. Review
    11. Minireview
    12. Communication
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      Cover Picture: (ChemSusChem 1/2012) (page 1)

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290000

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      Catalysis is a strategic field of science because it involves new ways of meeting energy and sustainability challenges. These challenges are main concerns in the context of a global vision on societal challenges and world economy, rendering green chemistry a “leitmotiv” in any project. The concept of green chemistry, which makes science of catalysis even more creative, has become an integral part of sustainability. Chemists and engineers working in these disciplines are creating scientific and technological breakthroughs that will be crucial to the future success of human society. This is only made possible by innovative discoveries from research groups all over the world. Scientists are working very hard to discover a variety of nanocatalysts to develop green and sustainable protocols, and this Special Issue on “Green Chemistry by Nanocatalysis”, with guest editors Vivek Polshettiwar and Jean-Marie Basset (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) and Didier Astruc (Univ. Bordeaux) will stimulate more research in this field.

  2. Editorials

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      Editorial: High Five! (pages 3–5)

      Guido M. Kemeling

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100849

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      The fifth element: At the start of the fifth volume, ChemSusChem is in good shape and ready to grow further as a leading publication in the fields of sustainable chemistry and energy materials. This Editorial looks at recent developments surrounding ChemSusChem and other journals from the ChemPubSoc Europe portfolio.

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      Editorial: Nanoscience Makes Catalysis Greener (pages 6–8)

      Prof. Vivek Polshettiwar, Prof. Jean-Marie Basset and Prof. Didier Astruc

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100850

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      Green chemistry by nanocatalysis: Catalysis is a strategic field of science because it involves new ways of meeting energy and sustainability challenges. The concept of green chemistry, which makes the science of catalysis even more creative, has become an integral part of sustainability. This special issue is at the interface of green chemistry and nanocatalysis, and features excellent background articles as well as the latest research results.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communication
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 1/2012 (pages 9–15)

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290003

  4. News

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    3. Editorials
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    5. News
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    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 1/2012 (pages 18–20)

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290001

  5. Reviews

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    1. Copper Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Carbon[BOND]Carbon and Carbon[BOND]Heteroatom Bond Formation with a Greener Perspective (pages 22–44)

      Prof. Dr. Brindaban C. Ranu, Raju Dey, Tanmay Chatterjee and Sabir Ahammed

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100348

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      An appraisal of copper: This review highlights the general features of nanoparticles as catalyst with particular reference to copper and the recent developments in the copper(0) nanoparticle-catalyzed bond formations and related reactions. The mechanisms of the reactions have been outlined and discussed with respect to the active catalytic species and possible intermediates. The scope, limitations, and green aspects of the reactions are also highlighted.

    2. Metal Nanoparticles as Heterogeneous Fenton Catalysts (pages 46–64)

      Dr. Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Dr. Sergio Navalon, Dr. Mercedes Alvaro and Prof. Hermenegildo Garcia

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100517

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      Fenton menace: The Fenton reaction involves generating hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide, and is very useful for the degradation of moderate concentrations of organic pollutants in aqueous solutions. We review metal nanoparticles, particularly iron-containing ones, which are widely used to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species from hydrogen peroxide to degrade organic pollutants, and are the subject of this Review.

  6. Minireviews

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    1. Nanocatalysis and Prospects of Green Chemistry (pages 65–75)

      Dr. Suresh Babu Kalidindi and Prof. Balaji R. Jagirdar

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100377

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      A fusion made in heaven: Collaboration of nanoscience with catalysis leads to the development of a new class of sustainable materials that fills the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. The advantages of nanosize in catalysis and its implications key issues in catalysis, such as activity, selectivity, and separation from the reaction medium, are discussed.

    2. Design of Nanocatalysts for Green Hydrogen Production from Bioethanol (pages 76–84)

      Dr. Nicolas Bion, Dr. Daniel Duprez and Dr. Florence Epron

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100400

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      Spotless bioethanol: not required? Green Hydrogen can be produced from crude bioethanol by using a finely tuned catalyst. This Minireview surveys the composition of bioethanol from first and second generation biomass, the reactions involved in the catalytic ethanol steam reforming process and the design of catalysts adapted for hydrogen production from a real bioethanol feed.

  7. Communication

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    1. Fibrous Nano-Silica (KCC-1)-Supported Palladium Catalyst: Suzuki Coupling Reactions Under Sustainable Conditions (pages 85–89)

      Dr. Aziz Fihri, Dr. Dongkyu Cha, Dr. Mohamed Bouhrara, Noor Almana and Prof. Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100379

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      Noble amines recycled: Fibrous high-surface-area nano-silica functionalized with aminopropyl groups and loaded with well-dispersed Pd nanoparticles is evaluated for the Suzuki coupling of aromatic halides. It is active for the reaction of a range of aryl bromides and iodides as well as chlorides with aryl boronic acids in good to excellent yields. The catalyst can be recovered and reused for a number of cycles with negligible loss in activity.

  8. Full Papers

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    1. Chiral Ammonium-Capped Rhodium(0) Nanocatalysts: Synthesis, Characterization, and Advances in Asymmetric Hydrogenation in Neat Water (pages 91–101)

      Elodie Guyonnet Bilé, Elodie Cortelazzo-Polisini, Dr. Audrey Denicourt-Nowicki, Rita Sassine, Prof. Franck Launay and Prof. Alain Roucoux

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100364

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      Green nanocatalysts: Optically active compounds derived from N-methylephedrine, N-methylprolinol, or cinchona derivatives with bromide or chiral lactate counterions are used as protective agents for rhodium(0) nanoparticles in asymmetric catalysis of the hydrogenation of ethyl pyruvate and m-methylanisole in water as a green solvent.

    2. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes as a Highly Active Metal-Free Catalyst for Selective Oxidation (pages 102–108)

      Dr. Kambiz Chizari, Dr. Adrien Deneuve, Dr. Ovidiu Ersen, Dr. Ileana Florea, Dr. Yu Liu, Prof. David Edouard, Dr. Izabela Janowska, Dr. Dominique Begin and Dr. Cuong Pham-Huu

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100276

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      Nanotubes say goodbye to H2S: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) are synthesized by using a chemical vapor deposition method under a mixture of C2H6/NH3/Ar with Fe/Al2O3 as a growth catalyst. N-CNTs can be used as a metal-free catalyst for the selective oxidation of H2S into elemental sulfur. The desulfurization activity can be further improved by supporting the N-CNT on a macroscopic host structure such as SiC foam.

    3. Highly Stable Noble-Metal Nanoparticles in Tetraalkylphosphonium Ionic Liquids for in situ Catalysis (pages 109–116)

      Abhinandan Banerjee, Robin Theron and Prof. Robert W. J. Scott

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100413

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      Stable morsels of metal: Palladium nanoparticles stabilized in tetraalkylphosphonium halide ionic liquids are stable, efficient, and recyclable catalysts for a variety of hydrogenation reactions at ambient pressures with sustained activity (see picture).

    4. Electrochemical Synthesis of Indium(0) Nanoparticles in Haloindate(III) Ionic Liquids (pages 117–124)

      Dr. Julien Estager, Dr. Peter Nockemann, Prof. Kenneth R. Seddon, Dr. Geetha Srinivasan and Dr. Małgorzata Swadźba-Kwaśny

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100331

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      Halo III: A new synthetic route to indium(0) nanoparticles via an electrochemical reduction of haloindate(III) ionic liquids to indium(I), and its subsequent disproportionation to indium(0) and indium(III) in the bulk electrolyte, is reported. In this sustainable method, the ionic liquid acts simultaneously as metal source, templating agent, and stabilizing agent, with the electron as the only reducing agent.

    5. Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol by using Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Ceria Foam (pages 125–131)

      Mosaed Alhumaimess, Dr. Zhongjie Lin, Weihao Weng, Dr. Nikolaos Dimitratos, Dr. Nicholas F. Dummer, Dr. Stuart H. Taylor, Dr. Jonathan K. Bartley, Prof. Christopher J. Kiely and Prof. Graham J. Hutchings

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100374

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      Tailored foam bed: Cerium oxide with a foam morphology is used as a support for gold nanoparticles. The foams are synthesized using L-asparagine to produce a cerium coordination polymer foam, which is calcined to give the oxide foam. The activity of the Au/foamCeO2 for solvent-free benzyl alcohol oxidation is superior to standard Au/CeO2 catalysts.

    6. Assembling Nanostructures for Effective Catalysis: Supported Palladium Nanoparticle Multicores Coated by a Hollow and Nanoporous Zirconia Shell (pages 132–139)

      Dr. Yanfei Wang, Dr. Ankush V. Biradar and Prof. Tewodros Asefa

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100385

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      Coating glassy caves: A highly efficient and recyclable nanocatalyst, consisting of SiO2 nanosphere-supported Pd nanoparticle multicores, coated with a hollow and nanoporous ZrO2 shell, is synthesized. The catalyst shows excellent catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of olefins and nitro groups, even at room temperature and moderate hydrogen pressure, owing to the small and stable Pd nanoparticles and their bare surface. The nanocatalyst also proves to be stable and can be recycled several times.

    7. A Versatile Route to Core–Shell Catalysts: Synthesis of Dispersible M@Oxide (M=Pd, Pt; Oxide=TiO2, ZrO2) Nanostructures by Self-Assembly (pages 140–148)

      Kevin Bakhmutsky, Dr. Noah L. Wieder, Matteo Cargnello, Benjamin Galloway, Prof. Dr. Paolo Fornasiero and Prof. Dr. Raymond J. Gorte

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100491

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      Down to the core with oxides: A versatile method for preparing functional core–shell catalysts is demonstrated for Pd and Pt cores with CeO2, TiO2, and ZrO2 shells. Unique catalytic properties are observed for the different combinations of core–shell structures due to the enhanced interactions between the metals and shells.

  9. Review

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    1. Furfural—A Promising Platform for Lignocellulosic Biofuels (pages 150–166)

      Dr. Jean-Paul Lange, Dr. Evert van der Heide, Dr. Jeroen van Buijtenen and Dr. Richard Price

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100648

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      Will it blend? Yes, it does! Furfural can be converted to a variety of biofuel components. Some upgrade pathways promise to deliver blending components with excellent fuel properties at moderate upgrade cost and CO2 emission. However, the overall manufacturing chain still presents major challenges in the production and recovery of furfural with good efficiency and competitive cost.

  10. Minireview

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    1. Isosorbide as a Renewable Platform chemical for Versatile Applications—Quo Vadis? (pages 167–176)

      Dr. Marcus Rose and Prof. Dr. Regina Palkovits

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100580

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      Unwritten tales of isosorbide: Isosorbide is a versatile platform chemical that can be derived from cellulosic biomass as a sustainable resource. Numerous derivatives can be obtained by using various chemical, chemocatalytic, and biotechnological processes to enable the replacement of products in numerous applications that are currently based on fossil resources.

  11. Communication

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    1. High-Capacity Silicon–Air Battery in Alkaline Solution (pages 177–180)

      Xing Zhong, Hua Zhang, Yuan Liu, Dr. Jingwei Bai, Dr. Lei Liao, Prof. Yu Huang and Prof. Xiangfeng Duan

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100426

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      Elements with potential: A silicon–air battery using an alkaline solution as electrolyte is comprised of only environmentally friendly and widely available elements, including silicon, potassium, oxygen, and hydrogen. The assembled battery exhibits an average working potential between 0.9 to 1.2 V at variable discharge current densities, and high specific capacities are achieved.

  12. Full Papers

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    1. Molecular-Scale Interface Engineering of Nanocrystalline Titania by Co-adsorbents for Solar Energy Conversion (pages 181–187)

      Dr. Mingkui Wang, Stefan Plogmaker, Dr. Robin Humphry-Baker, Dr. Peter Pechy, Prof. Håkan Rensmo, Dr. Shaik. M. Zakeeruddin and Prof. Michael Grätzel

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100549

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      Occupy TiO2: Co-grafting dyes with amphiphilic molecules containing phosphinic or phosphonic acid end groups can form a more compact monolayer than the adsorption of dye alone. This insulating molecular layer can effectively shield the back electron transfer from the conduction band of TiO2 to redox electrolytes. Herein coadsorbents are found to not only influence the dye loading, but also the geometry and electronic properties of the system.

    2. Separation of Reaction Product and Palladium Catalyst after a Heck Coupling Reaction by means of Organic Solvent Nanofiltration (pages 188–193)

      Dr. Anna Tsoukala, Dr. Ludmila Peeva, Prof. Andrew G. Livingston and Prof. Hans-René Bjørsvik

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100355

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      Squeezing products through holes: We have successfully developed an organic solvent nanofiltration process for the separation of [Pd(PPh3)OAc] from the products found in a Heck coupling postreaction mixture. A quantitative recovery of the products is achieved in a purity that meets the health and safety specifications for pharmaceutical products by using a commercially available membrane.

    3. Synthesis of Cyclic Sulfites from Epoxides and Sulfur Dioxide with Silica-Immobilized Homogeneous Catalysts (pages 194–199)

      Dr. Yasumasa Takenaka, Dr. Takahiro Kiyosu, Dr. Goro Mori, Dr. Jun-Chul Choi, Dr. Norihisa Fukaya, Prof. Toshiyasu Sakakura and Prof. Hiroyuki Yasuda

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100492

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      Immobilized for crimes of pyrolysis: Quaternary ammonium- and amino-functionalized silica catalysts promote the cycloaddition of sulfur dioxide to epoxides to produce cyclic sulfites in high yields (79–96 %) that are comparable to those with the homogeneous catalysts. Separation of the functionalized silica catalyst from the product solution by filtration avoids pyrolysis of the cyclic sulfites during purification by distillation.

    4. Homogeneous Catalysis of Valeronitrile Hydrolysis under Supercritical Conditions (pages 200–205)

      Dr. Michael Sarlea, Dr. Sabine Kohl, Nina Blickhan and Prof. Herbert Vogel

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100443

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      Supercritical tuning: The outstanding characteristic of water as a reaction medium is the possibility of tuning its properties by changing the temperature and pressure. In combination with small amounts of sulfuric acid, even the most resistant compounds show significant conversion within seconds. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of valeronitrile are investigated under supercritical conditions, which results in remarkable yields of valeric acid.

    5. Synthesis of Renewable Bisphenols from Creosol (pages 206–210)

      Dr. Heather A. Meylemans, Dr. Thomas J. Groshens and Dr. Benjamin G. Harvey

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100402

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      Plastics, naturally: Creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol), which can be readily derived from lignin, is selectively condensed with a series of aldehydes under stoichiometric conditions. The resulting compounds are isolated in good yields and purities. This method can be used to produce molecules that may have applications as renewable replacements for bisphenol A.

  13. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communication
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      Preview: ChemSusChem 2/2012 (page 211)

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290002

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