ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 12

December 2012

Volume 5, Issue 12

Pages 2289–2475

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Colloidal WO3 Nanowires as a Versatile Route to Prepare a Photoanode for Solar Water Splitting (ChemSusChem 12/2012) (page 2289)

      Ricardo H. Gonçalves, Lucas D. T. Leite and Prof. Dr. Edson R. Leite

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      WO3 Nanowires: Iluminado ao sol do Novo Mundo! The cover picture illustrates a tungsten oxide photoanode and a counter electrode that generate oxygen and hydrogen gas by water splitting under solar irradiation. The semiconductor properties of tungsten oxide are excellently suited to the design of a photoelectrochemical cell. On page 2341 of this issue, the Full Paper by Edson Leite and co-workers from the Federal University of Sao Carlos (Brazil) outlines a strategy for the production of photoanodes with excellent photoelectrochemical performance based on deposition of tungsten oxide nanowires. In situ TEM experiments are used to understand morphological transformation phenomena that occur during the sintering process.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Solvent Choices and Sustainable Chemistry (pages 2291–2292)

      Guido M. Kemeling

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200873

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No easy solutions: Choosing a solvent for a certain reaction is not easy, and involves sustainability on many levels. The choice can be motivated by wanting to reduce or avoid wastes, reduce resource use, lower risks to humans and the environment, lessen energy use, or other ways of avoiding liabilities and costs. ChemSusChem wishes to promote thoughtful discussions on solvent use, and outlines in this Editorial basic guidelines for authors and referees.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 12/2012 (pages 2293–2299)

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290051

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Crop-Derived Polysaccharides as Binders for High-Capacity Silicon/Graphite-Based Electrodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 2307–2311)

      Masahiro Murase, Prof. Naoaki Yabuuchi, Zhen-Ji Han, Dr. Jin-Young Son, Dr. Yi-Tao Cui, Dr. Hiroshi Oji and Prof. Shinichi Komaba

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200650

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rice to power: Amylopectin is a major component of agricultural products such as corn, potato, and rice. Silicon–graphite electrodes are prepared by using slurries of these polysaccharides as binders. Compared to the conventionally used binder PVdF, they exhibit drastically improved electrode performance in Li cells. The improved performance is coupled to the degree of branching.

    2. A Highly Active and Coke-Resistant Steam Reforming Catalyst Comprising Uniform Nickel–Iron Alloy Nanoparticles (pages 2312–2314)

      Mitsuru Koike, Dr. Dalin Li, Dr. Yoshinao Nakagawa and Prof. Keiichi Tomishige

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200507

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doing fine with Ni–Fe: The calcination and reduction of a hydrotalcite precursor containing Ni and Fe ions gives uniform Ni–Fe alloy nanoparticles mixed with Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O particles. The uniformity of the Ni–Fe alloy nanoparticles is connected to the catalyst′s high activity and resistance to coke formation in toluene and phenol steam reforming reactions.

    3. Coupling Effect Between Cobalt Oxides And Carbon For Oxygen Reduction Reaction (pages 2315–2318)

      Jing Liu, Prof. Luhua Jiang, Qiwen Tang, Bingsen Zhang, Prof. Dang Sheng Su, Suli Wang and Prof. Gongquan Sun

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200563

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Same selectivity hides different pathways: The same apparent 4-electron process for the oxygen-reduction-reaction hides different pathways over carbon-supported cobalt oxide catalysts depending on the potential. At low overpotentials, the ORR intermediate HO2 preferably disproportionates to oxygen, whereas at high overpotentials the disproportionation and reduction reaction occur in parallel.

    4. One-Step Dispersion of Cellulose Nanofibers by Mechanochemical Esterification in an Organic Solvent (pages 2319–2322)

      Pei Huang, Dr. Min Wu, Prof. Shigenori Kuga, Dr. Deqian Wang, Dr. Dayong Wu and Prof. Yong Huang

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200492

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Got a crush: Native cellulose can be dispersed as nanofibers in organic solvents by ball milling with esterification agents. Milling with hexanoyl chloride/DMF gives hexanoyl-coated nanofibers dispersible in several organic solvents. Milling with succinic anhydride/DMSO results water-dispersible nanofibers. The results open the way to new cellulose mechanochemistries.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Conductive Photoswitchable Vanadium Oxide Nanopaper based on Bacterial Cellulose (pages 2323–2327)

      Junkal Gutierrez, Dr. Susana C. M. Fernandes, Prof. Iñaki Mondragon and Dr. Agnieszka Tercjak

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200516

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible, conductive nanopaper: A bacterial cellulose mat is used as template for the fabrication of a conductive photoswitchable hybrid nanopaper by the incorporation of sol-gel synthesized vanadium nanoparticles. A simple, rapid, and low-cost pathway is developed for the production of vanadium oxide nanopaper. This work enables a new strategy for the fabrication of flexible, conductive, and optically active photochromic nanopaper.

    2. Functionalized Graphene for High Performance Lithium Ion Capacitors (pages 2328–2333)

      Ji Hoon Lee, Weon Ho Shin, Myung-Hyun Ryou, Jae Kyu Jin, Junhyung Kim and Prof. Jang Wook Choi

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200549

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Functionalized graphene: High performance lithium ion capacitors (LICs) have been constructed from urea-treated graphene and prelithiated graphite as cathode and anodes, respectively. Utilizing the enolization processes of amide functional groups on the graphene, an energy and power densities superior to those of previously reported LICs and supercapacitors could be achieved suggesting that appropriately treated graphene can be a promising electrode material for LICs.

    3. Controlled Synthesis of Monodisperse SiO2[BOND]TiO2 Microspheres with a Yolk–Shell Structure as Effective Photocatalysts (pages 2334–2340)

      Jung Bo Yoo, Hyo Jin Yoo, Byung Wook Lim, Kang Hyuk Lee, Mi Hyun Kim, Donghyeon Kang and Prof. Nam Hwi Hur

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200463

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Yolk–shell photocatalysts: We have developed an efficient method for making highly monodisperse yolk–shell microspheres using core–shell silica as a template. SiO2-TiO2 microspheres show enhanced photocatalytic activity, presumably as a result of multiple reflections of light within the interior cavities. This core–shell template method is effective for the synthesis of other yolk–shell microspheres with different metal oxides.

    4. Colloidal WO3 Nanowires as a Versatile Route to Prepare a Photoanode for Solar Water Splitting (pages 2341–2347)

      Ricardo H. Gonçalves, Lucas D. T. Leite and Prof. Dr. Edson R. Leite

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200484

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wired for success: We describe a synthetic method to produce WO3 nanowires as photoanodes through colloidal nanowire deposition. Among the several nanowires synthesized in non-hydrolytic media, orthorhombic WO3H2O nanowires show the best performance as photoanode and also good photocurrent stability during long-term analysis. Structural and photoelectrochemical characterization shows the importance of nanostructural features in WO3 photoanode performance.

    5. Synthesis of Carbohydrates in a Continuous Flow Reactor by Immobilized Phosphatase and Aldolase (pages 2348–2353)

      Lara Babich, Aloysius F. Hartog, Lieke J. C. van Hemert, Prof. Dr. Floris P. J. T. Rutjes and Prof. Dr. Ron Wever

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200468

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The dRAMA of arrested enzymes: A continuous flow reactor with three columns has been built with acid phosphatase and two different aldolases (RAMA and RhuA) immobilized on epoxy-functionalized beads (see figure). An enzymatic cascade reaction starting from dihydroxyacetone, pyrophosphate, and different aldehydes is performed in continuous mode to synthesize sugar analogues on a gram scale.

    6. Granular Bamboo-Derived Activated Carbon for High CO2 Adsorption: The Dominant Role of Narrow Micropores (pages 2354–2360)

      Haoran Wei, Dr. Shubo Deng, Bingyin Hu, Dr. Zhenhe Chen, Dr. Bin Wang, Dr. Jun Huang and Dr. Gang Yu

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200570

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Accurate micropores for CO2 sorption: Granular bamboo-derived activated carbon prepared through KOH activation has a high CO2 adsorption of 7.0 mmol g−1 (at 273 K and 1 bar), which is higher than almost all carbonaceous adsorbents. A more accurate micropore range contributing to CO2 adsorption is proposed. The volume of micropores in the range of 0.33–0.82 nm has a good linear relationship with CO2 adsorption (see figure).

    7. Towards Alternatives to Anodic Water Oxidation: Basket-Handle Thiolate FeIII Porphyrins for Electrocatalytic Hydrocarbon Oxidation (pages 2361–2375)

      Dr. Peiyi Li, Khalaf Alenezi, Dr. Saad K. Ibrahim, Dr. Joseph A. Wright, Dr. David L. Hughes and Prof. Christopher J. Pickett

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200572

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A preference for alcohol over oxygen: We show that iron porphyrins can mediate the anodic oxidation of hydrocarbons, thus providing a potential complementary reaction to cathodic generation of fuels or feedstocks as an alternative to oxygen evolution.

    8. Crystallinity-Controlled Titanium Oxide–Carbon Nanocomposites with Enhanced Lithium Storage Performance (pages 2376–2382)

      Yuanyuan Zhou, Dr. Jinwoo Lee, Dr. Chul Wee Lee, Mihye Wu and Dr. Songhun Yoon

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200450

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Extra capacity: Nanocomposites of amorphous TiO2–carbon are prepared by a novel one-step approach (see picture), in which the crystallinity of TiO2 is controlled, and applied in anodes in lithium ion batteries. For the first time, it is revealed that the capacity at 1.2 and 2.0 V corresponds to Li+ storage at amorphous and crystalline TiO2, respectively.

    9. Iron Complex with Ionic Tag-Catalyzed Olefin Reduction under Oxidative Conditions—A Different Reaction for Iron (pages 2383–2389)

      Dr. Marcelo R. dos Santos, Alexandre F. Gomes, Prof. Dr. Fabio C. Gozzo, Prof. Dr. Paulo A. Z. Suarez and Prof. Dr. Brenno A. D. Neto

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200344

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new reaction for an old metal: A new reaction for iron is described. The abundant and inexpensive metal is applied to the reduction of different olefins under oxidative conditions in ionic liquids with high yields. The catalytic system is recovered and at least ten recycles can be performed. The catalyst with ionic tags is used for ESI–MS analyses to reveal the mechanism of this new reaction. Isotopic labeling experiments are performed to confirm the proposed intermediates of the suggested catalytic cycle.

    10. Bifunctionalized Hollow Nanospheres for the One-Pot Synthesis of Methyl Isobutyl Ketone from Acetone (pages 2390–2396)

      Peng Wang, Shiyang Bai, Jiao Zhao, Panpan Su, Prof. Qihua Yang and Prof. Can Li

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200383

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Emptiness is good for something: Pd-doped sulfonic acid-functionalized nanospheres act as efficient bifunctional catalysts for the one-pot synthesis of methyl isobutyl ketone from acetone (see figure). They show superior catalytic performance in comparison with the bulk mesoporous counterparts.

    11. Selective Synthesis of 1-O-Alkyl(poly)glycerol Ethers by Catalytic Reductive Alkylation of Carboxylic Acids with a Recyclable Catalytic System (pages 2397–2409)

      Marc Sutter, Dr. Wissam Dayoub, Dr. Estelle Métay, Dr. Yann Raoul and Prof. Marc Lemaire

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200447

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reductive alkylation, a new sensation: Reductive alkylation of (poly)glycerol is realized for the first time with bio-sourced and/or cheap carboxylic acids under mild conditions by using a recyclable catalytic system. The corresponding 1-O-alkyl(poly)glycerol monoethers are obtained in good yield and selectivity, and the catalysts can be recycled three times with no loss of activity, opening a new access to glycerol ethers on a large scale.

    12. Electrocatalytic Reduction of Acetone in a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Reactor: A Model Reaction for the Electrocatalytic Reduction of Biomass (pages 2410–2420)

      Sara K. Green, Geoffrey A. Tompsett, Hyung Ju Kim, Prof. Won Bae Kim and Prof. George W. Huber

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200416

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Water powered: The electrocatalytic reduction of acetone to isopropanol is achieved with a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor. The electrolysis of water at the anode of the PEM reactor provides the protons for the reduction of acetone at the cathode. This reaction paves the way for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass-derived oxygenates to produce electrofuels.

    13. Microfocused X-ray Study on Precipitate Formation in the Separator Region of Nonaqueous Li–O2 Batteries (pages 2421–2426)

      Dr. Jiang-Lan Shui, Dr. John S. Okasinski, Dr. Dan Zhao, Dr. Jonathan D. Almer and Dr. Di-Jia Liu

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rejuvenation: Unexpectedly high concentrations of precipitates (mainly Li2CO3) with unique spatial and morphological distributions are detected in the separator region of Li–O2 batteries by microfocused XRD and SEM techniques, revealing the need for a stable electrolyte to minimize the deleterious effect of insoluble lithium salt (see picture).

    14. Selective Conversion of Polyenes to Monoenes by RuCl3-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation: The Case of Cashew Nutshell Liquid (pages 2427–2434)

      Sébastien Perdriau, Prof. Dr. Sjoerd Harder, Prof. Dr. Hero J. Heeres and Prof. Dr. Johannes G. de Vries

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nutty mechanism is found in the transfer hydrogenation of cardanol, which is a phenolic polyene constituent of cashew nutshell liquid, to the monoene with RuCl3 and isopropanol (see picture). It turns out that the catalyst is homogeneous and the substrate forms the ligand.

    15. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles (pages 2435–2441)

      Dr. Jiahui Kou and Dr. Rajender S. Varma

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200477

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Beet this juice: A simple, green, and fast approach was explored by using beet juice for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave irradiation, which is an unusual top-down hydrothermal synthesis. The as-prepared materials display good photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methyl orange dye.

    16. In Situ Intercalating Expandable Graphite for Mesoporous Carbon/Graphite Nanosheet Composites as High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes (pages 2442–2450)

      Dr. Lei Wang, Dr. Guang Mu, Dr. Chungui Tian, Dr. Li Sun, Dr. Wei Zhou, Dr. Taixing Tan and Prof. Honggang Fu

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200529

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super composites for supercapacitors: Mesoporous-carbon-coated graphite nanosheet composites (GNS@MC) are successfully prepared by intercalating resol prepolymer into the interlayers of microwaved expandable graphite. The resulting GNS@MCs exhibit outstanding capacitive performance and facilitate electron transport. The mesoporous structure of GNS@MC favors the rapid diffusion of ions by providing low-resistance pathways.

    17. Synthesis–Structure–Morphology Interplay of Bimetallic “Core–Shell” Carbon Nitride Nano-electrocatalysts (pages 2451–2459)

      Prof. Vito Di Noto, Dr. Enrico Negro, Prof. Stefano Polizzi, Dr. Filippo Agresti and Dr. Guinevere A. Giffin

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200517

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Power of two: Bimetallic “core–shell” carbon nitride oxygen reduction reaction nano-electrocatalysts are investigated (see picture). A model is proposed to rationalize the morphology and structure of the electrocatalysts, and to interpret the electrochemical behavior and performance of the materials.

    18. Mesoporous Siliconiobium Phosphate as a Pure Brønsted Acid Catalyst with Excellent Performance for the Dehydration of Glycerol to Acrolein (pages 2460–2468)

      Youngbo Choi, Dae Sung Park, Dr. Hyeong Jin Yun, Jayeon Baek, Danim Yun and Prof. Jongheop Yi

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200587

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pore-ing over the details: A new mesoporous solid Brønsted acid is synthesized by combining niobium phosphate with silicate to give a homogeneous composite (see picture). The resulting composite has nearly pure Brønsted acidity, large mesopores, and moderate acid strength; this leads to the efficient and stable conversion of glycerol into acrolein.

    19. Acceleration of Disproportionation of Aromatic Alcohols through Self-Emulsification of Reactants in Water (pages 2469–2473)

      Binbin Zhang, Dr. Jinliang Song, Dr. Huizhen Liu, Prof. Buxing Han, Prof. Tao Jiang, Dr. Honglei Fan, Dr. Zhaofu Zhang and Dr. Tianbin Wu

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200562

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amphiphilic Acceleration: Disproportionation reactions of aromatic alcohols are accelerated significantly in water. The main reason is that the reactants are amphiphilic and can emulsify the reactant/water systems at the reaction conditions. The reactant molecules at the water/reactant droplet interface orientate themselves in a regular fashion, which improves the contact probability of the reactive groups and Pd catalysts.

  7. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 1/2013 (page 2475)

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290053

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION