ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 7

July 2012

Volume 5, Issue 7

Pages 1129–1319

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Electrochemistry Serving People and Nature: High-Energy Ecocapacitors based on Redox-Active Electrolytes (ChemSusChem 7/2012) (page 1129)

      Prof. Elzbieta Frackowiak, Dr. Krzysztof Fic, Mikolaj Meller and Dr. Grzegorz Lota

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image highlights research by the group of Elzbieta Frackowiak at Poznan University of Technology, who describe in a Communication on p. 1181 the advantages of aqueous solutions of conjugated redox couples applied as electrolytes for electrochemical capacitors. Solutions of potassium iodide and vanadyl sulphate are investigated, and allow to reach high capacitance and voltage values. The energy density is about 20 Wh kg−1 with a maximum power density of 2 kW kg−1. These electrolytes offer an interesting alternative to organic electrolytes, which are usually applied in commercial supercapacitors.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 7/2012 (pages 1131–1138)

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290028

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Molybdenum, Molybdenum Oxides, and their Electrochemistry (pages 1146–1161)

      Dr. Viswanathan S. Saji and Prof. Chi-Woo Lee

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100660

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molybdenum and molybdenum oxides are used in many practical applications, such as CIS/CIGS solar cells in which molybdenum is employed as the back contact. This Review discusses the scattered information on the electrochemistry of molybdenum in metallic alloys, electrocatalysts, electrochromic materials, and energy materials critically, in the context of experimental results obtained on a commercial-grade molybdenum/glass electrode.

    2. A Comparative Review of Petroleum-Based and Bio-Based Acrolein Production (pages 1162–1180)

      Dr. Lu Liu, Dr. X. Philip Ye and Dr. Joseph J. Bozell

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100447

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Worthwhile glycerol: Biodiesel production and production capacity worldwide are increasing every year because of regulatory and socioeconomic motivations for renewable energy. Development of value-added chemicals from glycerol, the coproduct with biodiesel, is necessary to help sustain the biodiesel industry. Acrolein is a good example; its production from glycerol offers a promising alternative to the commercial method from propylene.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Electrochemistry Serving People and Nature: High-Energy Ecocapacitors based on Redox-Active Electrolytes (pages 1181–1185)

      Prof. Elzbieta Frackowiak, Dr. Krzysztof Fic, Mikolaj Meller and Dr. Grzegorz Lota

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positive Poles: A new type of electrochemical capacitor with two different aqueous solutions, separated by a Nafion membrane (see image) is described. High capacitance values as well as excellent energy/power characteristics are reported and discussed. The neutral character of the applied electrolytes makes this capacitor an environmentally friendly, easy to assemble, and cost-effective device for energy storage.

    2. Synthesis of Cu2ZnSnS4 Micro- and Nanoparticles via a Continuous-Flow Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Process (pages 1186–1189)

      Michael J. Casciato, Dr. Galit Levitin, Prof. Dennis W. Hess and Prof. Martha A. Grover

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200171

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      CZTS: Atlanta. A supercritical CO2 continuous-flow reactor is employed to deposit micro- and nanoparticles of copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), a promising material for thin-film solar cells, onto a silicon wafer. The image shows a chemical map of deposited CZTS particles (scale bar: 15 μm), and a Raman spectrum with a peak characteristic of CZTS.

    3. Efficient Solvent-Free Hydrogenation of Ketones over Flame-Prepared Bimetallic Pt–Pd/ZrO2 Catalysts (pages 1190–1194)

      Dr. Yijiao Jiang, Dr. Robert Büchel, Dr. Jun Huang, Dr. Frank Krumeich, Prof. Dr. Sotiris E. Pratsinis and Prof. Dr. Alfons Baiker

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Named and flamed: Bimetallic Pt–Pd/ZrO2 catalysts with different Pt/Pd atomic ratios and high dispersion of the metal nanoparticles are prepared by a single-step flame-spray pyrolysis. The catalysts show excellent activity and tunable product selectivity for the solvent-free hydrogenation of the ketone model compounds cyclopentanone and acetophenone.

    4. Low-Temperature Iron-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Polyethers (pages 1195–1198)

      Dr. Stephan Enthaler and Maik Weidauer

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Iron will: The iron-catalyzed depolymerization of a range of polyethers is studied. The products of the depolymerization reactions are chloroesters, which can be used as starting materials for new polymers. In the presence of simple iron salts extraordinary catalyst activities and selectivities are feasible at low temperature.

    5. Selective Oxidative Decarboxylation of Amino Acids to Produce Industrially Relevant Nitriles by Vanadium Chloroperoxidase (pages 1199–1202)

      Andrada But , Dr. Jérôme Le Nôtre, Dr. Elinor L. Scott, Prof. Ron Wever and Prof. Johan P. M. Sanders

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200098

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Industrial nitriles from biomass: Vanadium-chloroperoxidase is successfully used to transform selectively glutamic acid into 3-cyanopropanoic acid, a key intermediate for the synthesis of bio-succinonitrile and bio-acrylonitrile, by using a catalytic amount of a halide salt. This clean oxidative decarboxylation can be applied to mixtures of amino acids obtained from plant waste streams, leading to easily separable nitriles.

    6. Chemo-Enzymatic Conversion of Glucose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Seawater (pages 1203–1206)

      Philipp M. Grande, Christian Bergs and Dr. Pablo Domínguez de María

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Do you sea water? Water consumption will be a challenge in biorefineries, and the use of non-drinkable sources of water will be preferred. Herein, glucose is converted into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in a chemo-enzymatic one-pot, two-step procedure, involving immobilized glucose isomerase to produce fructose and oxalic acid to dehydrate it to HMF.

    7. Polyoxometalates Immobilized in Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nitride as Highly Efficient Water Oxidation Catalysts (pages 1207–1212)

      Dr. Jian Wu, Dr. Lingwen Liao, Prof. Wensheng Yan, Dr. Yan Xue, Dr. Yongfu Sun, Xin Yan, Prof. Yanxia Chen and Prof. Yi Xie

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100809

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Support with pom poms: A hybrid material ([Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2]10−/mesoporous carbon nitride) is prepared as an efficient water oxidation catalyst, and shows excellent catalytic activity for water oxidation. Mesoporous carbon nitride as an immobilization matrix improves the catalytic water oxidation activity and structural durability of the assembled nanostructures.

    8. Confined Iron Nanowires Enhance the Catalytic Activity of Carbon Nanotubes in the Aerobic Oxidation of Cyclohexane (pages 1213–1217)

      Xixian Yang, Dr. Hao Yu, Prof. Feng Peng and Dr. Hongjuan Wang

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inside job: New applications of carbon materials pave the way towards greener chemical syntheses. The encapsulation of metallic Fe within CNTs improves electron transfer between the metal and the CNTs. The resulting material offers a high catalytic activity and easy magnetic separation of catalyst in the heterogeneous selective oxidation of cyclohexane.

    9. Selective Reduction of Biomass by Hydriodic Acid and Its In Situ Regeneration from Iodine by Metal/Hydrogen (pages 1218–1222)

      Dr. Weiran Yang, Dr. Matthew R. Grochowski and Prof. Ayusman Sen

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100669

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      HI returns: Hydroiodic acid is a highly selective reducing reagent for a wide variety of substrates. Its application is limited by the formation of iodine and the difficulty in reconverting that iodione back to HI in situ. We report the facile conversion of I2 to HI by metal-catalyzed hydrogenation in the presence of water, and demonstrate the utility of this process in the conversion of fructose to 5-methyfurfural and glycerol to 2-iodopropane.

    10. Dehydration of Highly Concentrated Solutions of Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in a Cheap and Sustainable Choline Chloride/Carbon Dioxide System (pages 1223–1226)

      Dr. Fei Liu, Dr. Joël Barrault, Dr. Karine De Oliveira Vigier and Dr. François Jérôme

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200186

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fête DES sciences: The dehydration of fructose and inulin to HMF is conveniently performed in a cheap and sustainable choline chloride/CO2 deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. The medium is capable of converting high contents of fructose (>100 wt %) without affecting the yield of HMF (up to 72 %). The purity of the recovered HMF is >98%, and the reaction medium can be recycled.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Metal-Free Photocatalytic Graphitic Carbon Nitride on p-Type Chalcopyrite as a Composite Photocathode for Light-Induced Hydrogen Evolution (pages 1227–1232)

      Dr. Florent Yang, Dr. Michael Lublow, Steven Orthmann, Dr. Christoph Merschjann, Tobias Tyborski, Prof. Marin Rusu, Sven Kubala, Prof. Dr. Arne Thomas, Dr. Rosa Arrigo, Dr. Michael Hävecker and Dr. Thomas Schedel-Niedrig

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Trip the light fantastic: Graphitic carbon nitride films coated on p-type CuGaSe2 thin films can be successfully applied as new photoelectrochemical composite photocathodes for light-induced hydrogen evolution (see picture). The surface/near-surface chemical composition of the new photocathode is investigated by synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy.

    2. Microwave Decoration of Pt Nanoparticles on Entangled 3D Carbon Nanotube Architectures as PEM Fuel Cell Cathode (pages 1233–1240)

      Peter C. Sherrell, Dr. Weimin Zhang, Jie Zhao, Prof. Gordon G. Wallace, Dr. Jun Chen and Prof. Andrew I. Minett

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100667

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Entangled affairs: Alternative energy technologies require further development if they are to provide complementary power to fossil-fuel technology. It is shown that by loading Pt particles onto an entangled carbon nanotube scaffold, binding between Pt and the CNT backbone is strengthened, and simultaneously a significant improvement in both energy and power densities of a working fuel-cell device is observed .

    3. Nanoroses of Nickel Oxides: Synthesis, Electron Tomography Study, and Application in CO Oxidation and Energy Storage (pages 1241–1248)

      Dr. Aziz Fihri, Dr. Rachid Sougrat, Dr. Raghavan Baby Rakhi, Dr. Raed Rahal, Dr. Dongkyu Cha, Dr. Mohamed Nejib Hedhili, Dr. Mohamed Bouhrara, Prof. Dr. Husam N. Alshareef and Prof. Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100620

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A rose of nickel oxide on the desert: A convenient synthetic protocol for the production of nickel oxide with a unique nanorose morphology under microwave irradiation conditions has been developed, which enables the design of new catalysts by tuning the shapes and morphologies of the materials. The obtained nanostructures are single crystals composed of nanosheets and can be used as catalyst for CO oxidation and as energy storage materials.

    4. Synthesis, Characterization, and CO2 Adsorptive Behavior of Mesoporous AlOOH-Supported Layered Hydroxides (pages 1249–1257)

      Dr. Yen-Po Chang, Yu-Chun Chen, Dr. Po-Hsueh Chang and Prof. San-Yuan Chen

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100617

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Peeling back the layers: We have successfully developed a novel mesoporous metal oxide as CO2 solid sorbent for high temperature. The sorbent is prepared by calcining mesoporous AlOOH-supported CaAl layered double hydroxides. It exhibits ordered mesoporous arrays and displays a maximum CO2 adsorption capacity, a rapid adsorption rate, longer cycle lives and, increased number of activated sites in the mesostructures (see picture).

    5. The Origin of Molecular Mobility During Biomass Pyrolysis as Revealed by In situ 1H NMR Spectroscopy (pages 1258–1265)

      Dr. Anthony Dufour, Dr. Miguel Castro-Diaz, Prof. Nicolas Brosse, Dr. Mohamed Bouroukba and Prof. Colin Snape

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100442

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biomass becomes fluid: An understanding of biomass pyrolysis mechanisms is of great importance for the production of biofuels and green chemicals. The pyrolysis products are highly affected by the mobility of protons. Mobility of the protons is mainly produced by the thermal conversion of lignin and xylan. Interactions between polymers in the native biomass network are evidenced.

    6. Energy Efficiency Enhancement of Ethanol Electrooxidation on Pd–CeO2/C in Passive and Active Polymer Electrolyte-Membrane Fuel Cells (pages 1266–1273)

      Dr. Valentina Bambagioni, Dr. Claudio Bianchini, Yanxin Chen, Dr. Jonathan Filippi, Prof. Paolo Fornasiero, Dr. Massimo Innocenti, Alessandro Lavacchi, Andrea Marchionni, Dr. Werner Oberhauser and Dr. Francesco Vizza

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100738

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Energizing Ce: We report the first examples of direct ethanol fuel cells containing anode electrocatalysts made of Pd nanoparticles supported on ceria (Pd–CeO2/C). A comparison with a standard anode electrocatalyst containing Pd nanoparticles (Pd/C) shows that, at the same metal loading and experimental conditions, the energy released by the cells with the Pd–CeO2/C electrocatalyst is twice as much as that supplied by the cells with the Pd/C electrocatalyst.

    7. Yeast-Based Microporous Carbon Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture (pages 1274–1279)

      Dr. Wenzhong Shen, Dr. Yue He, Dr. Shouchun Zhang, Dr. Junfen Li and Prof. Weibin Fan

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100735

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A baker's recipe: Hierarchical microporous carbon materials prepared from yeast activated with KOH show excellent CO2-capture capacity as a result of large numbers of nitrogen-containing groups and high surface area and pore volume. The amount of CO2 adsorbed is higher, and the rate of adsorption is faster, than when directly carbonizing the same yeast.

    8. Kinetics and Reaction Engineering of Levulinic Acid Production from Aqueous Glucose Solutions (pages 1280–1290)

      Ronen Weingarten, Dr. Joungmo Cho, Dr. Rong Xing, Prof. William Curtis Conner Jr and Prof. George W. Huber

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100717

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plug wins over stirring: A plug flow reactor is preferred over a continuously stirred tank reactor for aqueous-phase production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid from glucose (estimated levulinic acid carbon yield of 57 %—68 % of theoretical yield). There is no distinct advantage to implementing a system of two consecutive reactors compared to a single-plug flow reactor.

    9. Lignin Model Compounds as Bio-Based Reactive Diluents for Liquid Molding Resins (pages 1291–1297)

      Joseph F. Stanzione III, Dr. Joshua M. Sadler, Dr. John J. La Scala and Prof. Richard P. Wool

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100687

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Glassy lignin makes good resins: Lignin model compounds have been methacrylated and utilized as reactive diluents in a vinyl ester-based resin without the need to include the traditionally used reactive diluent styrene. The glass transition temperatures of the cured resins are comparable to those containing styrene, demonstrating the ability of these lignin model compounds to completely replace styrene as reactive diluents in liquid molding resins without sacrificing thermal performance.

    10. Regeneration of Silica-Supported Silicotungstic Acid as a Catalyst for the Dehydration of Glycerol (pages 1298–1306)

      Dr. Benjamin Katryniok, Prof. Sébastien Paul, Dr. Mickaël Capron, Dr. Virginie Bellière-Baca, Dr. Patrick Rey and Prof. Franck Dumeignil

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100635

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic support: The regeneration of supported silicotungstic acid, widely used in the dehydration of glycerol to yield acrolein, is described. The nature of the support has a strong impact on the thermal stability of the active phase. Zirconia stabilizes silicotungstic acid, thus enabling efficient and nondestructive regeneration (see picture).

    11. Application of Y2O3:Er3+ Nanorods in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1307–1312)

      Jiangli Wang, Prof. Jihuai Wu, Prof. Jianming Lin, Prof. Miaoliang Huang, Dr. Yunfang Huang, Dr. Zhang Lan, Dr. Yaoming Xiao, Dr. Gentian Yue, Dr. Shu Yin and Prof. Tsugio Sato

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100596

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Illuminating rare earths: Y2O3:Er3+ nanorods are introduced into a TiO2 electrode in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Y2O3:Er3+ improves infrared light harvesting and photocurrent through up-conversion luminescence. The rare earth ions improve the energy level of the TiO2 electrode through a doping effect and thus increase the photovoltage. The DSSC doped with Y2O3:Er3+ achieves an energy conversion efficiency of 7.0 %, which is 19.9 % higher than the DSSC without Y2O3:Er3+.

    12. Catalytic Air Oxidation of Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates to Formic Acid (pages 1313–1318)

      Jiang Li, Dao-Jun Ding, Li Deng, Prof. Qing-Xiang Guo and Prof. Dr. Yao Fu

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201100466

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Breathing life into new conversions: An efficient conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates into formic acid (FA) can be achieved when catalyzed by H5PV2Mo10O40, which can also be used for the conversion of cellulose into FA. X-ray photoelectron spectra and reactions of possible intermediates indirectly shed light on the reaction mechanism involving electron and oxygen transfer processes.

  7. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemSusChem 8/2012 (page 1319)

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201290030

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION