ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 3

March 2013

Volume 6, Issue 3

Pages 389–544

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Electrooxidation of Ethylene Glycol and Glycerol on Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C Anodes in Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (ChemSusChem 3/2013) (page 389)

      Dr. Andrea Marchionni, Dr. Manuela Bevilacqua, Dr. Claudio Bianchini, Dr. Yan-Xin Chen, Dr. Jonathan Filippi, Dr. Paolo Fornasiero, Dr. Alessandro Lavacchi, Dr. Hamish Miller, Dr. Lianqin Wang and Dr. Francesco Vizza

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201390011

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      The cover image highlights the research carried out by the group of Francesco Vizza at ICCOM-CNR in Florence, which is reported on page 518. It shows a direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) that converts alcohols into various oxygenate products, providing at the same time excellent power densities, thus exploiting the ability of the anode electrocatalyst to bring about the partial oxidation of either ethylene glycol (EG) or glycerol (G) with high selectivity and fast kinetics. The power densities obtained in the temperature range from 20 to 80 °C, with palladium loadings at the anode as low as 1 mg cm−2, show that Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C can be classified as the best performing palladium-based electrocatalyst ever reported for EG and G electro-oxidation.

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Electrooxidation in Alkaline Media of Ethylene Glycol and Glycerol on Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C Anodes in Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (page 390)

      Dr. Andrea Marchionni, Dr. Manuela Bevilacqua, Dr. Claudio Bianchini, Dr. Yan-Xin Chen, Dr. Jonathan Filippi, Dr. Paolo Fornasiero, Dr. Alessandro Lavacchi, Dr. Hamish Miller, Dr. Lianqin Wang and Dr. Francesco Vizza

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300154

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      “Processes that selectively produce industrially relevant feedstocks from renewables with concomitant release of energy can be realized for alcohols such as glycerol and ethylene glycol by means of devices such as direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs).” This and more about the story behind the front cover research can be found on p. 390.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 3/2013 (pages 391–399)

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201390012

  4. Corrigendum

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
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      Corrigendum: Conversion of (Ligno)Cellulose Feeds to Isosorbide with Heteropoly Acids and Ru on Carbon (page 399)

      Beau Op de Beeck, Dr. Jan Geboers, Dr. Stijn Van de Vyver, Jonas Van Lishout, Jeroen Snelders, Dr. Wouter J. J. Huijgen, Prof. Dr. Christophe M. Courtin, Prof. Dr. Pierre A. Jacobs and Prof. Dr. Bert F. Sels

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300171

      This article corrects:

      Conversion of (Ligno)Cellulose Feeds to Isosorbide with Heteropoly Acids and Ru on Carbon

      Vol. 6, Issue 1, 199–208, Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013

  5. Masthead

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
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    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 3/2013 (page 401)

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201390013

  6. News

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    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 3/2013 (pages 402–404)

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201390014

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
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    6. Masthead
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    1. Membrane Microreactors: Gas–Liquid Reactions Made Easy (pages 405–407)

      Dr. Timothy Noël and Prof. Dr. Volker Hessel

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200913

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      Getting phases together: Membrane microreactors provide new opportunities for gas–liquid reactions. The advantages of this microreactor concept are a large interfacial area, a greater flexibility with regard to flow rates, and the opportunity to immobilize a catalyst on the membrane.

    2. Towards Photo-Rechargeable Textiles Integrating Power Conversion and Energy Storage Functions: Can We Kill Two Birds with One Stone? (pages 408–410)

      Dr. Tao Song and Prof. Baoquan Sun

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200889

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      Wearable power supplies: Photo-rechargeable devices integrating power conversion and energy storage functions are useful for supplying power to portable electronics. A recent report introduces a facile method to fabricate flexible dual-functional devices on a single metal wire which paves the way for wearable fabric power supplies.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    1. Pt-like Behavior of High-Performance Counter Electrodes Prepared from Binary Tantalum Compounds Showing High Electrocatalytic Activity for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 411–416)

      Dr. Sining Yun, Mingxing Wu, Yudi Wang, Jing Shi, Xiao Lin, Prof. Anders Hagfeldt and Prof. Tingli Ma

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200845

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      Ta-based compounds show Pt-like behavior: Binary tantalum compounds as counter electrodes (CEs) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) demonstrate Pt-like electrocatalytic activity and competitive photovoltaic performance, matching the performance of DSCs with Pt CEs. The first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide a strategy for understanding the relationship between the electronic structure and the catalytic activity of CE catalysts in DSCs.

    2. A Unique Palladium Catalyst for Efficient and Selective Alkoxycarbonylation of Olefins with Formates (pages 417–420)

      Dr. Ivana Fleischer, Dr. Reiko Jennerjahn, Dr. Daniela Cozzula, Dr. Ralf Jackstell, Prof. Dr. Robert Franke  and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200759

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      Forget about CO! Carbonylations are among the most important homogeneously catalyzed reactions in the chemical industry, but typically require carbon monoxide. Instead, straightforward and efficient alkoxycarbonylations of olefins can proceed with alkyl formates in the presence of a specific palladium catalyst. Aromatic, terminal aliphatic, and internal olefins are carbonylated to give industrially important linear esters at low catalyst loadings.

    3. Hydroisomerization of Emerging Renewable Hydrocarbons using Hierarchical Pt/H-ZSM-22 Catalyst (pages 421–425)

      Prof. Johan A. Martens, Dr. Danny Verboekend, Dr. Karine Thomas, Gina Vanbutsele, Prof. Jean-Pierre Gilson and Prof. Javier Pérez-Ramírez

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200888

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      Last site standing: A new generation of hierarchical Pt/H-ZSM-22 zeolites is designed for the efficient processing of upcoming renewable feedstocks. The enhanced accessibility of the active sites is vital for the superior activity and exceptional selectivity in the hydroisomerization of model molecules such as nonadecane and pristane.

    4. Selective Metal-Catalyzed Transfer of H2 and CO from Polyols to Alkenes (pages 426–429)

      Dr. J. Johan Verendel, Michael Nordlund and Prof. Pher G. Andersson

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200843

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      Transmission of alcohols achieved: A method for the direct transfer of the CHOH function from simple polyols to alkenes has been developed. In a dual-reactor system, successive iridium-catalyzed dehydrogenations and decarbonylations of polyols such as glycerol and sorbitol generates a low pressure of syngas, which is directly used in ex situ alkene hydroformylation.

    5. Acid-Catalyzed Hydration of Alkynes in Aqueous Microemulsions (pages 430–432)

      Zackaria Nairoukh, Prof. David Avnir and Prof. Jochanan Blum

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200838

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      Terminal aromatic alkynes are converted rapidly into ketones in a regioselective manner by treatment of their microemulsions with 0.33 M mineral acid between 80 and 140 °C. Internal and aliphatic acetylenes are likewise hydrated, but require longer reaction periods. The products are easily isolated from the reaction mixtures by phase separation. Replacement of H2O by D2O leads to the formation of trideuteriomethyl ketones.

    6. Conductive Magnetite Nanoparticles Accelerate the Microbial Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer Processes (pages 433–436)

      Dr. Federico Aulenta, Dr. Simona Rossetti, Dr. Stefano Amalfitano, Prof. Mauro Majone and Dr. Valter Tandoi

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200748

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      Playing your part: Conductive magnetite nanoparticles accelerate the microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE), an ubiquitous and toxic subsurface contaminant. The stimulatory effect most likely results from the nanoparticles promoting the establishment of interspecies electron transfer (IET) processes between non-dechlorinating and dechlorinating microorganisms.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Mesoporous Fluorocarbon-Modified Silica Aerogel Membranes Enabling Long-Term Continuous CO2 Capture with Large Absorption Flux Enhancements (pages 437–442)

      Dr. Yi-Feng Lin, Chien-Hua Chen, Prof. Kuo-Lun Tung, Dr. Te-Yu Wei, Prof. Shih-Yuan Lu and Dr. Kai-Shiun Chang

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200837

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      Water repulsion and CO2 attraction: We have developed a SiO2 aerogel membrane modified with [BOND]CF3 functional groups. This has the potential to be used in a membrane contactor for CO2 absorption. The as-coated hydrophobic SiO2 aerogel membranes reveal excellent reusability. The hydrophobized silica aerogel membrane contactor is a promising technology for large-scale CO2 absorption during the post-combustion process in power plants.

    2. Robust Cycling of Li–O2 Batteries through the Synergistic Effect of Blended Electrolytes (pages 443–448)

      Byung Gon Kim, Je-Nam Lee, Dong Jin Lee, Prof. Jung-Ki Park and Prof. Jang Wook Choi

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200801

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      Blend and conquer: A blended electrolyte that consists of propylene carbonate and an ionic liquid is tested for Li–O2 batteries. Both components perform complementary functions to each other to overcome the drawbacks of the other component. Such synergistic effects allow substantially improved lifetimes, the most critical parameter in Li–O2 batteries. This study confirms the importance and opportunities of the use of electrolytes in Li–O2 batteries.

    3. BaSnO3 Perovskite Nanoparticles for High Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 449–454)

      Dr. Dong Wook Kim, Seong Sik Shin, Dr. Sangwook Lee, Dr. In Sun Cho, Dong Hoe Kim, Chan Woo Lee, Prof. Hyun Suk Jung and Prof. Kug Sun Hong

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200769

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      Electron collection: A high-potential material, BaSnO3, as the photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is explored. The DSSC that is fabricated using highly crystalline BaSnO3 nanoparticles shows an overall energy conversion efficiency of 5.2 %, which is the highest performance in ternary oxide-based DSSCs. This high performance comes from rapid charge capture in the BaSnO3 nanoparticle photoelectrode.

    4. Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation and Deoxygenation of Glucose on Solid Metal Electrodes (pages 455–462)

      Youngkook Kwon and Prof. Marc T. M. Koper

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200722

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      Electrocatalytic glucose hydrogenation: The hydrogenation of glucose to sorbitol or 2-deoxysorbitol in neutral media has been studied on solid metal electrodes. Three groups of catalysts can be identified from the periodic table, with regard to the main reaction products: (1) early transition metals and platinum group metals (hydrogen formation); (2) late transition metals and Al (sorbitol formation); and (3) post-transition metals, as well as Zn, and Cd (sorbitol and 2-deoxysorbitol formation).

    5. Improvement on the Catalytic Performance of Mg–Zr Mixed Oxides for Furfural–Acetone Aldol Condensation by Supporting on Mesoporous Carbons (pages 463–473)

      Laura Faba, Dr. Eva Díaz and Prof. Salvador Ordóñez

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200710

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      Carbon supports improve catalytic activity: The yield of the catalytic acetone–furfural aldol condensation is improved by supporting the Mg–Zr mixed oxide on carbon nanofibers and high surface area graphites. For preparation of the catalysts, coprecipitation achieves the best conversion and selectivity towards C13 compounds (biodiesel precursor). This behavior is consistent with improved basic site distribution and increased interaction of the reactants with the carbon surface.

    6. Graphene Oxide-Dispersed Pristine CNTs Support for MnO2 Nanorods as High Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes (pages 474–480)

      Dr. Bo You, Na Li, Hongying Zhu, Xiaolan Zhu and Prof. Jun Yang

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200709

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      The energy superstore: High performance supercapacitor electrodes based on MnO2–CNT–graphene oxide nanocomposites are fabricated using graphene oxide as a surfactant to directly disperse pristine carbon nanotubes. Subsequently, MnO2 nanorods have been deposited to produce a supercapacitor electrode that exhibits ideal capacitive behavior in addition to many other advantageous characterisitics.

    7. Influence of Composition on the Performance of Sintered Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Nanocrystal Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices (pages 481–486)

      Dr. Vahid A. Akhavan, Taylor B. Harvey, C. Jackson Stolle, Dr. David P. Ostrowski, Micah S. Glaz, Dr. Brian W. Goodfellow, Dr. Matthew G. Panthani, Dariya K. Reid, Prof. David A. Vanden Bout and Prof. Brian A. Korgel

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200677

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      Composition influences sintering and performance: The performance of selenized Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanocrystal photovoltaics has been observed to change dramatically with different [Ga]/[In+Ga] ratios in the nanocrystals. The [Ga]/[In+Ga] concentration alters the [Cu]/[In+Ga] content in the nanocrystals, which influences sintering and film morphology (see image), leading to very significant variations in device efficiency.

    8. Unraveling the Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics of Electroactive Microbial Biofilms Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (pages 487–492)

      Hoang K. Ly, Dr. Falk Harnisch, Dr. Siang-Fu Hong, Prof. Dr. Uwe Schröder, Prof. Dr. Peter Hildebrandt and Dr. Diego Millo

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200626

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      Speed dating for electrons: Heterogeneous electron transfer across the biofilm/electrode interface is a slow process promoted by surface-confined cytochromes that are not in direct physical contact with the electrode. Subsequent electron transfer from the surface-confined cytochromes to more remote redox centers within the biofilm is a much faster process. Herein, an approach is identified as a powerful tool for selectively probing interfacial processes of biofilms close to the electrode surface.

    9. Sulfur and Nitrogen Co-Doped, Few-Layered Graphene Oxide as a Highly Efficient Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen-Reduction Reaction (pages 493–499)

      Dr. Jiaoxing Xu, Guofa Dong, Prof. Chuanhong Jin, Dr. Meihua Huang and Prof. Lunhui Guan

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200564

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      Double doping: S and N co-doped, few-layered graphene oxide catalysts show increased activity for the electroreduction of oxygen compared to mono-doped S and N carbon nanomaterials. The co-doped catalysts exhibit competitive catalytic activity (10 mA cm−2 kinetically limited current density at −0.25 V versus Ag/AgCl) and superior methanol tolerance and durability in comparison to the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

    10. Cellulose Conversion with Tungstated-Alumina-Based Catalysts: Influence of the Presence of Platinum and Mechanistic Studies (pages 500–507)

      Flora Chambon, Dr. Franck Rataboul, Dr. Catherine Pinel, Dr. Amandine Cabiac, Dr. Emmanuelle Guillon and Dr. Nadine Essayem

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200880

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      Support for platinum: The hydrothermal treatment of cellulose under H2 in the presence of tungstated alumina-based catalysts (AlW) yields lactic acid or acetol and propylene glycol as the main products depending on the presence or absence of supported platinum.

    11. Triarylamine-Substituted Imidazole- and Quinoxaline-Fused Push–Pull Porphyrins for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 508–517)

      Dr. Hironobu Hayashi, Dr. Abeda Sultana Touchy, Yuriko Kinjo, Prof. Kei Kurotobi, Yuuki Toude, Prof. Seigo Ito, Hanna Saarenpää, Prof. Nikolai V. Tkachenko, Prof. Helge Lemmetyinen and Prof. Hiroshi Imahori

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200869

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      Pushing and pulling: A push–pull porphyrin with an electron-donating and an electron-withdrawing group at opposite sites has been synthesized to evaluate the effect of the push–pull structure on optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties. This system exhibited a power conversion efficiency that is higher than that of the dye without the electron-donating group.

    12. Electrooxidation of Ethylene Glycol and Glycerol on Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C Anodes in Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (pages 518–528)

      Dr. Andrea Marchionni, Dr. Manuela Bevilacqua, Dr. Claudio Bianchini, Dr. Yan-Xin Chen, Dr. Jonathan Filippi, Dr. Paolo Fornasiero, Dr. Alessandro Lavacchi, Dr. Hamish Miller, Dr. Lianqin Wang and Dr. Francesco Vizza

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200866

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      An excellent electrocatalyst! The electrooxidation of ethylene glycol (EG) and glycerol (G) has been studied, in alkaline media, in passive as well as active direct ethylene glycol fuel cells and direct glycerol fuel cells containing Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C as anode electrocatalyst, that is, Pd nanoparticles supported on a Ni–Zn phase. Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C can be classified amongst the best performing Pd-based electrocatalysts ever reported for EG and G oxidation.

    13. Fractionation of Organosolv Lignin from Olive Tree Clippings and its Valorization to Simple Phenolic Compounds (pages 529–536)

      Dr. Ana Toledano, Dr. Luis Serrano, Dr. Alina Mariana Balu, Dr. Rafael Luque, Antonio Pineda and Dr. Jalel Labidi

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200755

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      Value-added waste: A new lignin valorization approach is proposed that involves ultrafiltration as a fractionation process to separate different molecular weight (MW) lignin fractions followed by a hydrogen-free, mild, hydrogenolytic, heterogeneously catalyzed methodology (see picture; NP=nanoparticle).

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      Chitin Nanowhisker Aerogels (pages 537–544)

      Lindy Heath, Lifan Zhu and Dr. Wim Thielemans

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200717

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      Chitin aerogels are prepared by the aqueous self-assembly of chitin nanowhiskers under low-power sonication, followed by solvent exchange with ethanol and drying with scCO2. The aerogels have a high modulus and only shrink by 4 % on average during the solvent exchange and scCO2 drying steps. These aerogels could be useful as thermal insulators, catalyst supports and for the construction of biomedical materials.

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