ChemSusChem

Cover image for ChemSusChem

August 2013

Volume 6, Issue 8

Pages 1289–1555

  1. Cover Picture

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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Highlight
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Towards High Conductivity in Anion-Exchange Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells (ChemSusChem 8/2013) (page 1289)

      Dr. Nanwen Li, Dr. Michael D. Guiver and Prof. Wolfgang H. Binder

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300682

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      The cover shows an anion-exchange membrane for use in an alkaline fuel cell. Due to its unique structure it can act as an electrolyte and facilitate the transport of hydroxide ions, the mobility of which is usually by its low intrinsic conductivity. Binder et al. demonstrate in their manuscript on page 1376 how this structure can be obtained. The simple technique involves the quaternization of azide-modified poly(2,6-dimethyl-phenylene oxide) through click chemistry. The introduction of triazoles in this way results in the formation of “nanochannels”, which in turn gives rise to a tenfold increase in hydroxide mobility.

  2. Cover Profile

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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
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      Towards High Conductivity in Anion-Exchange Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells (page 1290)

      Dr. Nanwen Li, Dr. Michael D. Guiver and Prof. Wolfgang H. Binder

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300681

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      “The basic idea was to design a polymer able to form nanometer-scale channels that serve to improve transport of ions.” This and more about the story behind the research featured on the front cover (page 1289) can be found in this months Cover Profile on page 1290.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 8/2013 (pages 1291–1302)

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201390030

  4. Masthead

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    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 8/2013 (page 1303)

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201390031

  5. News

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  6. Highlight

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    1. Lanthanide-Doped Upconverting Nanoparticles: Harvesting Light for Solar Cells (pages 1308–1311)

      Dr. Rafik Naccache, Prof. Fiorenzo Vetrone and Prof. John A. Capobianco

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300362

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      Nanoharvest on a big scale: The capacity to harvest near-infrared photons from the sun can greatly improve the efficiency of solar cells. Near-infrared excitation of upconverting nanoparticles results in the generation of visible emission and increasing the electrical output of a photovoltaic device.

  7. Communications

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    1. TiO2(B)/Anatase Composites Synthesized by Spray Drying as High Performance Negative Electrode Material in Li-Ion Batteries (pages 1312–1315)

      Dr. Edgar Ventosa, Bastian Mei, Dr. Wei Xia, Prof. Martin Muhler and Prof. Wolfgang Schuhmann

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300439

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      The power of spray-dried TiO2 in LIBs: TiO2(B)/anatase is synthesized by spray drying and investigated as negative electrode material in Li-ion batteries. It exhibits excellent Li-ion storage performances, especially at high charge/discharge rates. The presence of the β phase of TiO2 improves Li-ion diffusivity. Additionally, the scalable synthesis method also allows for Nb-doping, which assists in the maintenance of the electronic conductivity as the thickness of film increases.

    2. Pt Nanoparticles Immobilized on CVD-Grown Graphene as a Transparent Counter Electrode Material for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1316–1319)

      Dr. Van-Duong Dao, Dr. Lam Van Nang, Prof. Eui-Tae Kim, Dr. Joong-Kee Lee and Prof. Ho-Suk Choi

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300353

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      Crystal clear: Dry plasma reduction is used for continuously immobilizing platinum nanoparticles on CVD-grown graphene under atmospheric pressure without using any toxic chemicals while keeping the temperature low. The PtNPs/graphene-coated counter electrode exhibits a reasonably low charge-transfer resistance and a high optical transmittance.

    3. Electrochemical Properties of Yolk-Shell, Hollow, and Dense WO3 Particles Prepared by using Spray Pyrolysis (pages 1320–1325)

      Chul Min Sim, Young Jun Hong and Prof. Yun Chan Kang

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300257

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      Treading on eggshells: WO3 powders are prepared by using a one-step spray pyrolysis process. Different spray solutions are used (with or without sucrose), and particles with various morphologies (yolk-shell, hollow, and dense-structured) are achieved. The yolk-shell composite demonstrates electrochemical properties that are superior to the particles with dense and hollow structures at a high current density.

    4. Oxygen Vacancy Engineering of Cerium Oxides for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Reduction (pages 1326–1329)

      Dr. Sheng-Chiang Yang, Prof. Wei-Nien Su, Dr. John Rick, Prof. Shawn D. Lin, Jyong-Yue Liu, Dr. Chun-Jern Pan, Dr. Jyh-Fu Lee and Prof. Bing-Joe Hwang

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300219

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      Treasure OVE: The performance of doped ceria for CO2 adsorption is investigated by oxygen vacancy engineering (OVE), that is, the formation and regeneration of oxygen vacancies. The doping and synthesis methods can be adapted to OVE, while reduction with hydrogen effectively restores the number of oxygen vacancies back to its original level. The regeneration characteristics of ceria and the catalytic conversion of adsorbed CO2 at moderate temperatures are also explored.

    5. Recycling Nutrients in Algae Biorefinery (pages 1330–1333)

      Laura Garcia Alba, Mathijs P. Vos, Dr. Cristian Torri, Prof. Dr. Daniele Fabbri, Prof. Dr. Sascha R. A. Kersten and Dr. Derk W. F. Brilman

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200988

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      Algal fuel cells: Repeated nutrient recycling is demonstrated by reusing the aqueous phase obtained from the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of microalgae. This is achieved, for the first time, by performing a complete set of four continuous growth–HTL cycles. Results show similar growth rates in each cycle, the potential of nutrient reduction, as well as cell morphology changes. This study demonstrates progress towards the standalone operation of algae biorefineries.

    6. Iron-Catalyzed Ring-Closing Depolymerization of Poly(tetrahydrofuran) (pages 1334–1336)

      Dr. Stephan Enthaler and Alexandra Trautner

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300380

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      Closed encounter: Inexpensive and abundant FeCl3 is demonstrated as an effective pre-catalyst for the ring-closing depolymerization of polytetrahydrofuran (polyTHF) to produce tetrahydrofuran (THF) in high purity and good yields. The protocol is of interest for efficient waste management of end-life polyTHF, and the produced THF is a suitable starting material for new polymeric materials, allowing for an overall efficient recycling process

    7. A Sustainable Process for Catalytic Oxidative Bromination with Molecular Oxygen (pages 1337–1340)

      Zhijun Huang, Dr. Fengbo Li, Bingfeng Chen , Tao Lu , Yin Yuan  and Prof. Guoqing Yuan

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300289

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      Workin′ in a bromine: A palladium–polyoxometalate amphiphilic hybrid material serves as catalyst for oxidative brominations. The emulsion-based process avoids the use of toxic and corrosive bromination agents such as Br2 or HBr, and uses molecular oxygen as oxidant. The only side product is water, which is also the reaction medium. The catalyst offers good recoverability and recyclability.

    8. Ceria-Catalyzed Conversion of Carbon Dioxide into Dimethyl Carbonate with 2-Cyanopyridine (pages 1341–1344)

      Dr. Masayoshi Honda, Dr. Masazumi Tamura, Dr. Yoshinao Nakagawa, Satoru Sonehara, Dr. Kimihito Suzuki, Dr. Ken-ichiro Fujimoto and Prof. Dr. Keiichi Tomishige

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300229

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      DMC run: Carbon dioxide can be converted into dimethyl carbonate in a reaction system involving 2-cyanopyridine as a dehydration agent, catalyzed by CeO2. Regeneration of the coproduct 2-picolinamide can be achieved over a Na2O/SiO2 catalyst. As a whole, the system servest to react carbon dioxide with methanol to produce dimethyl carbonate.

    9. Highly Selective Hydrogenolysis of Glycerol to 1,3-Propanediol over a Boehmite-Supported Platinum/Tungsten Catalyst (pages 1345–1347)

      Dr. Racha Arundhathi, Dr. Tomoo Mizugaki, Dr. Takato Mitsudome, Prof. Dr. Koichiro Jitsukawa and Prof. Dr. Kiyotomi Kaneda

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300196

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      Business is boehming: Boehmite-supported platinum nanoparticles and tungsten oxides exhibit high catalytic activity towards the selective hydrogenolysis of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol. The reaction furthermore proceeds efficiently in aqueous solution without the requirement for any additives. This solid catalyst also demonstrates excellent durability, maintaining high catalytic activity and selectivity during recycling experiments.

    10. Heterogeneous Palladium Catalysts for Decarbonylation of Biomass-Derived Molecules under Mild Conditions (pages 1348–1351)

      Yao-Bing Huang, Zhen Yang, Meng-Yuan Chen, Jian-Jun Dai, Prof. Qing-Xiang Guo and Prof. Yao Fu

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300190

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      Workin′ 6 to 5: A highly active heterogeneous catalyst, Pd/SBA-15(DP), promotes the selective decarbonylation of biomass-derived HMF to furfural alcohol with a high yield, up to 96 %, in mild conditions. The route offers a simple and effective method of linking C6 and C5 molecules in the biomass conversion value chain. In addition to HMF the catalyst is effective towards the decarbonylation of other biomass-derived aldehydes, also.

    11. Highly Active and Recyclable Sn-MWW Zeolite Catalyst for Sugar Conversion to Methyl Lactate and Lactic Acid (pages 1352–1356)

      Qiang Guo, Dr. Fengtao Fan, Dr. Evgeny A. Pidko, William N. P. van der Graaff, Prof. Dr. Zhaochi Feng, Prof. Dr. Can Li and Prof. Dr. Emiel J. M. Hensen

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300160

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      Not just sugar! Lewis-acidic Sn-MWW zeolites are obtained through postsynthesis functionalization of deboronated B-MWW with Sn. These materials are highly active, selective, and recyclable catalysts for the conversion of triose sugars to methyl lactate (in methanol) and lactic acid (in water). They also demonstrate good performance in the conversion of hexose sugars and sucrose to methyl lactate.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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    1. Water Reduction Systems Associated with Homoleptic Cyclometalated Iridium Complexes of Various 2-Phenylpyridines (pages 1357–1365)

      Yong-Jun Yuan, Dr. Zhen-Tao Yu, Jian-Guang Cai, Dr. Chao Zheng, Prof. Dr. Wei Huang and Prof. Dr. Zhi-Gang Zou

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300451

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      Photo shy: A series of homoleptic tris-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes are used for visible-light-induced hydrogen production with excellent activity and stability in the presence of [Rh(dtb-bpy)3]3+ as a water reduction catalyst and TEOA as an electron donor. This progress could pave the way towards the development of prolonged-lifetime and high-activity photocatalytic systems.

    2. Design of OsII-based Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Influence of Heterocyclic Ancillaries (pages 1366–1375)

      Fa-Chun Hu, Sheng-Wei Wang, Dr. Miquel Planells, Dr. Neil Robertson, Dr. Harihara Padhy, Bo-Sian Du, Prof. Dr. Yun Chi, Po-Fan Yang, Prof. Dr. Hao-Wu Lin, Dr. Gene-Hsiang Lee and Prof. Dr. Pi-Tai Chou

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300417

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      Heavyweight: A series of OsII-based sensitizers are prepared and demonstrated to be suitable dyes for the fabrication of DSCs with the I/I3 electrolyte solution. The panchromatic light harvesting capability of these sensitizers extends into the near-IR region, which is achieved by simple replacement of RuII with the more reducible and heavier OsII metal. Our results underline an attainable strategy for producing DSCs with potential industrial applications.

    3. Towards High Conductivity in Anion-Exchange Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells (pages 1376–1383)

      Dr. Nanwen Li, Dr. Michael D. Guiver and Prof. Wolfgang H. Binder

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300320

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      Make it snappy: Clicked 1,2,3-triazoles incorporated into anion-exchange membranes (AEMs) provide more sites to form efficient continuous hydrogen-bond networks for anion transport. Such molecular structures show a dramatic enhancement in anion conductivity compared to typical AEMs without triazole groups.

    4. One-step Synthesis of Vertically Aligned Anatase Thornbush-like TiO2 Nanowire Arrays on Transparent Conducting Oxides for Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1384–1391)

      Dr. Dong Kyu Roh, Won Seok Chi, Sung Hoon Ahn, Harim Jeon and Prof. Jong Hak Kim

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300317

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      There′s something good behind the thorn: High-density anatase-phase vertically aligned thornbush-like TiO2 nanowires on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) glasses result in high-efficiency solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, which exhibits one of the highest values observed for N719 dyes. This can be attributed to improved surface areas, light-scattering effects, and charge transport rates.

    5. Whiter, Brighter, and More Stable Cellulose Paper Coated with TiO2/SiO2 Core/Shell Nanoparticles using a Layer-by-Layer Approach (pages 1392–1399)

      Dr. Fei Cheng, Mark Lorch, Seyed Mani Sajedin, Prof. Stephen M. Kelly and Dr. Andreas Kornherr

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300305

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      Let the sunshine in: TiO2/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles are prepared, deposited and fixed onto the surface of cellulosic paper by a polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer approach, which significantly improves the whiteness and brightness of the paper and its stability to UV-degradation and bleaching.

    6. Enhanced Lithium Battery with Polyethylene Oxide-Based Electrolyte Containing Silane–Al2O3 Ceramic Filler (pages 1400–1405)

      Berhanu W. Zewde, Dr. Shimelis Admassie, Dr. Jutta Zimmermann, Dr. Christian Schulze Isfort, Prof. Bruno Scrosati and Dr. Jusef Hassoun

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300296

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      Polymer power: A polyethylene oxide-based electrolyte was prepared with the addition of silane-treated Al2O3 ceramic filler. The new ceramic additive leads to an enhancement of the ionic conductivity, thermal properties, and lithium transference number of the polymer electrolyte. The electrolyte can be efficiently used in lithium cells with a LiFePO4 cathode, operating within 60–90 °C with a high capacity and a long cycle life.

    7. Energy Storage on Ultrahigh Surface Area Activated Carbon Fibers Derived from PMIA (pages 1406–1413)

      Dr. Alberto Castro-Muñiz, Dr. Fabián Suárez-García, Prof. Dr. Amelia Martínez-Alonso, Prof. Dr. Juan M. D. Tascón and Prof. Dr. Takashi Kyotani

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300295

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      Versatile microporous carbon fibers: High-performance activated carbon fibers with different textural and surface chemical properties are obtained from a polymeric fiber by simply choosing different preparation conditions. The fibers show very promising performances in energy storage applications such as H2 storage and supercapacitors.

    8. Custom-Made Morphologies of ZnO Nanostructured Films Templated by a Poly(styrene-block-ethylene oxide) Diblock Copolymer Obtained by a Sol–Gel Technique (pages 1414–1424)

      Kuhu Sarkar, Dr. Monika Rawolle, Dr. Eva M. Herzig, Weijia Wang, Dr. Adeline Buffet, Dr. Stephan V. Roth and Prof. Dr. Peter Müller-Buschbaum

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300291

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      Made to measure: A polymer-assisted sol–gel route is used to synthesize tailor-made zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures in thin films (see picture). An amphiphilic diblock copolymer plays a key role as a templating agent and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZAD) serves as the precursor for ZnO. Thin films are produced by spin coating or solution casting followed by calcination at high temperature to ensure crystallinity.

    9. Organic Sensitizers Featuring a Planar Indeno[1,2-b]-thiophene for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1425–1431)

      Kimin Lim, Dr. Myung Jong Ju, Juman Song, In Taek Choi, Kwangsuk Do, Hyeju Choi, Prof. Kihyung Song, Prof. Hwan Kyu Kim and Prof. Jaejung Ko

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300281

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      How well does a dye work? The sensitizer reported herein has a strong molar absorption coefficient and a red-shifted absorption band, which results in a significant increase in the short-circuit photocurrent density. A device based on this sensitizer gives rise to high conversion efficiencies that are among the highest values reported for dye-sensitized solar cells based on organic sensitizers.

    10. Enhanced Performance of p-Type Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Ultrasmall Mg-Doped CuCrO2 Nanocrystals (pages 1432–1437)

      Dr. Dehua Xiong, Wenjun Zhang, Xianwei Zeng, Zhen Xu, Prof. Wei Chen, Jin Cui, Prof. Mingkui Wang, Prof. Licheng Sun and Prof. Yi-Bing Cheng

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300265

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      Don't dye: A Mg-doped CuCrO2-nanoparticle-based photocathode achieves superior performance over CuCrO2 and NiO reference cathodes in p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. Higher light harvesting is attained compared to the CuCrO2 reference, and improved charge collection/lower valance band position is obtained compared to the NiO reference.

    11. Polyethylene-Glycol-Doped Polypyrrole Increases the Rate Performance of the Cathode in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries (pages 1438–1444)

      Prof. Feng Wu, Dr. Junzheng Chen, Prof. Li Li, Teng Zhao, Zhen Liu and Prof. Renjie Chen

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300260

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      Grab your coat…: Polypyrrole can be doped with polyethylene glycol and then coated onto the surface of sulfur/aligned carbon nanotubes to produces a composite cathode material for Li/S batteries. The battery can work at a very high current density, and the cathode exhibits a high initial specific capacity and sulfur usage. A high reversible capacity is also retained after 100 cycles.

    12. Enhanced Performance in Inverted Polymer Solar Cells with D–π–A-Type Molecular Dye Incorporated on ZnO Buffer Layer (pages 1445–1454)

      Chang Eun Song, Ka Yeon Ryu, Dr. Seong-Jin Hong, Dr. Chinna Bathula, Prof. Sang Kyu Lee, Prof. Won Suk Shin, Prof. Jong-Cheol Lee, Prof. Si Kyung Choi, Prof. Joo Hyun Kim and Prof. Sang-Jin Moon

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300240

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      It's a cover up! A new organic dye self-assembled on ZnO surface through carboxylate bonding has positive effects on the photovoltaic performance of inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). This dye is based on a D–π–A system and can mediate forward charge transfers, reduce back charge recombination, passivate ZnO surface defects, and give good energy level alignments leading to largely enhanced efficiency and stability in inverted PSCs.

    13. Amination of Heteroaryl Chlorides: Palladium Catalysis or SNAr in Green Solvents? (pages 1455–1460)

      Katie Walsh, Dr. Helen F. Sneddon and Prof. Dr. Christopher J. Moody

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300239

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      Substitutions go green: The reaction of heteroaryl chlorides with amines in water in the presence of KF results in a SNAr reaction and N-arylation as a viable green alternative to palladium-catalysed amination.

    14. Mesoporous TiN Microspheres with Hierarchical Chambers and Enhanced Visible Light-Driven Hydrogen Evolution (pages 1461–1466)

      Prof. Guisheng Li, Peng Zhang, Prof. Zhenfeng Bian, Prof. Jian Zhu, Ling Wu and Prof. Hexing Li

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300221

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      Open into the light: Mesoporous titanium nitride (TiN) microspheres with tunable structures are synthesized through NH3 nitridation and structure duplication of organotitania. The yolk–shell TiN demonstrates high H2 yield in visible light-induced photocatalytic water splitting owing to a narrow energy band gap, unique chamber structure, high surface area, and excellent electrical conductivity, which promoted light harvesting, reactant adsorption, and photoelectron–hole separation.

    15. BETA Zeolite Thin Films Supported on Honeycomb Monoliths with Tunable Properties as Hydrocarbon Traps under Cold-Start Conditions (pages 1467–1477)

      Miriam Navlani-García, Dr. Francisco J. Varela-Gandía, Dr. Agustín Bueno-López, Prof. Diego Cazorla-Amorós, Begoña Puértolas, Dr. José M. López, Dr. Tomás García and Dr. Dolores Lozano-Castelló

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300215

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      Cautious driving: The optimization of two coating methods allows the preparation of BETA zeolite thin films supported on honeycomb monoliths with tunable properties. A highly effective hydrocarbon trap for the abatement of cold-start emissions from the gasoline vehicles was obtained. The important effect of the film density on the final performance is demonstrated.

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      Ammoniation–Dehydration of Fatty Acids into Nitriles: Heterogeneous or Homogeneous Catalysis? (pages 1478–1489)

      Dr. Adrien Mekki-Berrada, Dr. Simona Bennici, Dr. Jean-Philippe Gillet, Dr. Jean-Luc Couturier, Dr. Jean-Luc Dubois and Prof. Dr. Aline Auroux

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300210

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      In the zinc: Catalysts of different acid–base surface features are screened, which include efficient catalysts from the patent literature. Zn and In species display the best results at 250 °C, which correlates with the amount of dissolved materials in the medium. Clues are obtained for coordination complexes formed from ammonia and carboxylates as the catalytically active forms.

    17. Aromatic Chemicals by Iron-Catalyzed Hydrotreatment of Lignin Pyrolysis Vapor (pages 1490–1499)

      Dr. Roberto Nicolas Olcese, George Lardier, Prof. Mohammed Bettahar, Dr. Jaafar Ghanbaja, Dr. Sébastien Fontana, Dr. Vincent Carré, Prof. Frédéric Aubriet, Prof. Dominique Petitjean and Dr. Anthony Dufour

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300191

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      Lignin is fond of iron: Lignin is a promising source for renewable aromatics. Inexpensive iron-based catalysts are very selective for the direct hydrodeoxygenation of lignin pyrolysis vapors. Two types of coke deposit are revealed. Lignin oligomers are analyzed by very high resolution mass spectrometry.

    18. Imidazolium-Based Poly(ionic liquid)s as New Alternatives for CO2 Capture (pages 1500–1509)

      Elena I. Privalova, Erno Karjalainen, Dr. Mari Nurmi, Dr. Päivi Mäki-Arvela, Dr. Kari Eränen, Prof. Heikki Tenhu, Prof. Dmitry Yu. Murzin and Prof. Jyri-Pekka Mikkola

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300120

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      Pretty poly(ionic liquid)s! Solid poly(ionic liquid)s that contain the poly[2-(1-butylimidazolium-3-yl)ethyl methacrylate] cation and different anions, in particular a new combination with the acetate anion, are evaluated for CO2 capture and demonstrated to be alternative CO2 sorption materials.

    19. Assembly of Tin Oxide/Graphene Nanosheets into 3D Hierarchical Frameworks for High-Performance Lithium Storage (pages 1510–1515)

      Yanshan Huang, Dr. Dongqing Wu, Dr. Sheng Han, Shuang Li, Li Xiao, Dr. Fan Zhang and Prof. Xinliang Feng

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300109

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      Go go graphene electrodes! A strategy to fabricate monolithic three-dimensional (3D) graphene frameworks with SnO2 nanoparticles (SnO2/GFs) is presented. The combination of mesopores, macropores, large surface area, and 3D architecture of the hybrids not only effectively prevents agglomeration of SnO2 nanoparticles, but also facilitates fast ion and electron transport in 3D pathways, which results in an outstanding lithium storage performance.

    20. Carbon Nanofibers Grafted on Activated Carbon as an Electrode in High-Power Supercapacitors (pages 1516–1522)

      Prof. Grażyna Gryglewicz, Agata Śliwak and Prof. François Béguin

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300095

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      Coated to perfection: Activated carbon (AC) with a nickel catalyst is coated in situ with herringbone carbon nanofibers (CNFs) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition from propane at 450 °C. The CNF/AC composite is implemented in supercapacitors, showing much higher power than the pristine AC, which is attributed to the presence of CNFs to enhance ion diffusion in the electrode and act as electronic bridges between AC particles (see picture).

    21. Enhanced H2 Separation through Mixed Proton–Electron Conducting Membranes Based on La5.5W0.8M0.2O11.25−δ (pages 1523–1532)

      Dr. Sonia Escolastico, Janka Seeger, Dr. Stefan Roitsch, Dr. Mariya Ivanova, Dr. Wilhelm A. Meulenberg and Dr. José. M. Serra

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300091

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      Party in full flow! La5.5WO11.25−δ-based H2 separation flows are improved by using Re and Mo as dopants in the W position. The influence of the H2 concentration on the feed stream, degree of humidification, and operating temperature are studied for both compounds. Unrivaled H2 flow values are reached for the La5.5W0.8Re0.2O11.25−δ membrane, and good stability in CO2 is demonstrated.

    22. Versatile Eco-friendly Pickering Emulsions Based on Substrate/Native Cyclodextrin Complexes: A Winning Approach for Solvent-Free Oxidations (pages 1533–1540)

      Dr. Loïc Leclercq, Roberto Company, Andrea Mühlbauer, Adrien Mouret, Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Aubry and Prof. Dr. Véronique Nardello-Rataj

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300081

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      Disperse and conquer! Solvent-less Pickering emulsions have been developed and applied to catalytic oxidation. The systems are stabilized by inclusion complexes between cyclodextrins and substrates forming a 3D network among the dispersed phase. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and [Na]3[PW12O40] as a catalyst, they provide particularly efficient eco-friendly reaction media for the oxidation of olefins, organosulfurs, and alcohols.

    23. Pacman and Hangman Metal Tetraazamacrocycles (pages 1541–1544)

      Dr. Chang Hoon Lee, Dr. Dino Villágran, Dr. Timothy R. Cook, Prof. Jonas C. Peters and Prof. Daniel G. Nocera

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300068

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      Man the gallows! Metal complexes of derivatized tetraazamacrocyclic ligands (see picture) are synthesized by metal-templated condensation between 3,3′-diaminodipropylamine and 4-substituted diacetylpyridine derivatives, which are prepared by palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. An electrochemical study on a Hangman complex prepared this way provides a cautionary note that residual amounts of palladium can support H2 generation.

    24. Conversion of Cellulose and Cellobiose into Sorbitol Catalyzed by Ruthenium Supported on a Polyoxometalate/Metal–Organic Framework Hybrid (pages 1545–1555)

      Prof. Dr. Jinzhu Chen, Shengpei Wang, Jing Huang, Dr. Limin Chen, Prof. Dr. Longlong Ma and Dr. Xing Huang

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200914

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      Acid/Metal Balance: Bifunctional catalysts containing ruthenium and polyoxometalates as active species with a metal-organic framework as support and encapsulation matrix, respectively, are synthesized. Excellent yields in sorbitol are obtained in the conversion of cellobiose and ball-milled cellulose. The evaluation of the balance between the hydrogenation and hydrolysis functions of these bifucntional catalysts reveals that by carefully balancing the ratio of acid site density and the number of metal surface atoms a maximum conversion can be achieved.

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