ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 10

October 2014

Volume 7, Issue 10

Pages 2757–2953

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Redox-Initiated Hydrogel System for Detection and Real-Time Imaging of Cellulolytic Enzyme Activity (ChemSusChem 10/2014) (page 2757)

      Klara H. Malinowska, Tobias Verdorfer, Aylin Meinhold, Lukas F. Milles, Victor Funk, Prof. Dr. Hermann E. Gaub and Dr. Michael A. Nash

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402797

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      On the Front Cover, cellulolytic enzymes break down plant fibers into fermentable sugars, providing a route to biofuel production. A hydrogel reagent signaling (HyReS) system is developed that converts oligosaccharides produced during biomass hydrolysis into a fluorescent hydrogel. When combined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, this system allows the real-time detection and localization of enzyme activity. More details can be found in the Full Paper on page 2825 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402428), while more information about the research group is available in the Cover Profile (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402796).

      Image courtesy Christoph Hohmann, Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM).

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Efficient Water-Splitting Device Based on a Bismuth Vanadate Photoanode and Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells (ChemSusChem 10/2014) (page 2758)

      Lihao Han, Dr. Fatwa F. Abdi, Prof. Dr. Roel van de Krol, Dr. Rui Liu, Dr. Zhuangqun Huang, Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Lewerenz, Prof. Dr. Bernard Dam, Prof. Dr. Miro Zeman and Dr. Arno H. M. Smets

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402901

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      The Inside Cover illustrates the cross-sectional sketch of a hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) water-splitting device with a benchmark solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.2 % under simulated air mass (AM) 1.5 illumination. The cell consists of a gradient-doped tungsten–bismuth vanadate (W:BiVO4) photoanode and a thin-film silicon solar cell. This record efficiency for metal oxide-based water-splitting devices is reached by further optimization of the doping profile in the W:BiVO4 photoanode as well as the smart design of the micromorph silicon (a-Si:H/nc-Si:H) cell. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Han et al. on page 2832 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402456).

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: A Combinatorial Approach towards Water-Stable Metal–Organic Frameworks for Highly Efficient Carbon Dioxide Separation (ChemSusChem 10/2014) (page 2955)

      Zhigang Hu, Kang Zhang, Mei Zhang, Dr. Zhengang Guo, Prof. Jianwen Jiang and Prof. Dan Zhao

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402982

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      The Inside Back Cover shows the crystal structure of an ionized Zr metal–organic framework (MOF) and its selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 and CH4 for applications in clean energy and environmental sustainability. A library of 20 UiO-66-derived MOFs is synthesized in a combinatorial approach involving mixed ligand copolymerization and two post-synthetic modifications in tandem. These MOFs exhibit excellent water stabilities in a pH range of 1 to 12, together with high CO2 uptake capacities and selectivities as revealed by the analysis of 147 isotherms. This approach paves a way towards the systematic study of water-stable and affordable MOFs as highly efficient adsorbents for CO2 separation in the applications of post-combustion CO2 capture and natural gas upgrading. More details can be found in the Communication by Hu et al. on page 2791 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402378).

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Rapid Double-Dye-Layer Coating for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells using a New Method (ChemSusChem 10/2014) (page 2956)

      Cho-long Jung, Chi-Hwan Han, Prof. Doo Kyung Moon and Prof. Yongseok Jun

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402948

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      The Back Cover picture illustrates a dye-multi-layered working electrode that has been prepared by applying a novel method. The new method using viscous solvents such as ethylene glycol and glycerol shortens the dye coating time to the minute scale and makes it possible to position the dye coating at a specific depth of the working electrode within minutes. This method is useful for extending sunlight harvesting by application of various dyes with different light absorption peaks. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Jung et al on page 2839 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402232).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Redox-Initiated Hydrogel System for Detection and Real-Time Imaging of Cellulolytic Enzyme Activity (page 2759)

      Klara H. Malinowska, Tobias Verdorfer, Aylin Meinhold, Lukas F. Milles, Victor Funk, Prof. Dr. Hermann E. Gaub and Dr. Michael A. Nash

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402796

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      “Part of the solution to the global energy problem will rely on efficient biological conversion of cellulose into fuels and chemicals…‥” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the cover image can be found on page 2759 (10.1002/cssc.201402796). View the Front Cover on page 2757 (10.1002/cssc.201402797).

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 10/2014 (pages 2760–2767)

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201490034

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 10/2014 (pages 2768–2769)

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201490035

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 10/2014 (pages 2770–2773)

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201481013

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  6. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Sonochemistry: What Potential for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass into Platform Chemicals? (pages 2774–2787)

      Dr. Gregory Chatel, Dr. Karine De Oliveira Vigier and Dr. François Jérôme

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402289

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      Blowing up wood speedily: This Review focuses on the use of ultrasound to produce chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The potential of sonochemistry is high, but the technology is mainly used for production of low-value chemicals such as biodiesel or as simple method for pretreatment or extraction. Herein, we show that the access to added-value chemicals can be easily and sometimes solely obtained by the use of ultrasound.

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Oxidant-Free Dehydrogenative Coupling Reactions via Hydrogen Evolution (pages 2788–2790)

      Ke-Han He and Prof. Dr. Yang Li

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402606

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      Oxidant-free dehydrogenative coupling reactions: Recently, coupling reactions have followed a novel strategy for the construction of C[BOND]C, C[BOND]N, C[BOND]P, and S[BOND]S bonds by dehydrogenation without using any extra oxidant, via H2 evolution. These breakthroughs inspire a new direction in the construction of chemical bonds, towards more sustainable, highly atom-economical, and environmentally benign synthetic methods.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. A Combinatorial Approach towards Water-Stable Metal–Organic Frameworks for Highly Efficient Carbon Dioxide Separation (pages 2791–2795)

      Zhigang Hu, Kang Zhang, Mei Zhang, Dr. Zhengang Guo, Prof. Jianwen Jiang and Prof. Dan Zhao

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402378

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      With our powers combined: A library of 20 UiO-66-derived metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) is synthesized following a combinatorial approach involving mixed ligand copolymerization and two post-synthetic modifications in tandem. The MOFs have excellent water stabilities in a pH range of 1 to 12 together with high carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake capacities and selectivities. These features make them promising adsorbents in adsorption-based CO2 separations such as post-combustion CO2 capture and upgrading natural gas.

    2. Selective Hydrogenation of Furan-Containing Condensation Products as a Source of Biomass-Derived Diesel Additives (pages 2796–2800)

      Dr. Madhesan Balakrishnan, Eric R. Sacia and Prof. Alexis T. Bell

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402764

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      Furans to fuels: Production of diesel fuels from lignocellulosic feedstocks has largely relied on hydrodeoxygenation of oxygenates to alkanes. However, the products of selective ring saturation have been demonstrated herein to provide diesel additives of exceptional quality with minimal H2 input. Further, a new class of heterogeneous palladium catalysts with tunable surface properties achieves excellent yields to cyclic ethers without hydrogenolysis.

    3. High-Performance Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on a Binuclear Ruthenium Catalyst for Visible-Light-Driven Water Oxidation (pages 2801–2804)

      Linlin Zhang, Dr. Yan Gao, Xin Ding, Dr. Ze Yu and Prof. Licheng Sun

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402561

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      Ru-bi: Two photoanodes, one based on a binuclear and the other based on a mononuclear ruthenium water oxidation catalyst in combination with a molecular photosensitizer, are prepared by using a co-adsorption method. When used in dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells for visible light driven water splitting, the device using the binuclear complex as catalyst exhibits better performance. Differing reaction mechanisms can explain the difference in catalytic activity.

    4. Biological Construction of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electron Transfer Pathways in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 2805–2810)

      Dr. Ippei Inoue, Kiyoshi Watanabe, Hirofumi Yamauchi, Prof. Dr. Yasuaki Ishikawa, Dr. Hisashi Yasueda, Prof. Dr. Yukiharu Uraoka and Prof. Dr. Ichiro Yamashita

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402514

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      Tube light: A nanocomposite of TiO2-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is synthesized by using a cage-shaped protein supramolecule with SWNT-binding and Ti-mineralization bifunctionality. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that use the SWNT–TiO2 nanocomposite show decreased electrical resistance (by 50 %) and improved power conversion efficiency (by 120 %) compared to SWNT-free reference DSSCs.

    5. Triple-Conducting Layered Perovskites as Cathode Materials for Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (pages 2811–2815)

      Junyoung Kim, Sivaprakash Sengodan, Goeun Kwon, Dong Ding, Jeeyoung Shin, Meilin Liu and Guntae Kim

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402351

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      Triple play: Proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (H+-SOFCs) have received a great deal of attention for intermediate-temperature SOFCs. However, the performance of the H+-SOFCs is limited by the cathode material. Triple-conducting oxide cathodes could enhance the electrochemical performance by extending the electrochemically active site to the entire surface of cathode.

    6. One-pot Aldol Condensation and Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass-derived Carbonyl Compounds for Biodiesel Synthesis (pages 2816–2820)

      Dr. Laura Faba, Dr. Eva Díaz and Prof. Salvador Ordóñez

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402236

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      One step is enough! The use of bifunctional catalysts allows the integration of aldol condensation and total hydrodeoxygenation of the condensation products in a single step. Using an aqueous solution of furfural and acetone, selectivities to alkanes higher than 50 % are obtained when Pt/Mg–Zr oxides are used as catalyst. The use of organic solvent, carbonaceous supports, or mechanical mixtures of basic and metal catalysts leads to poorer results.

    7. Ecofriendly Porphyrin Synthesis by using Water under Microwave Irradiation (pages 2821–2824)

      César A. Henriques, Dr. Sara M. A. Pinto, Dr. Gilberto L. B. Aquino, Dr. M. Pineiro, Dr. Mário J. F. Calvete and Dr. Mariette M. Pereira

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402464

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      Micro-Porph′in-Power Rangers: Water, under microwave irradiation and at high temperatures, aids the synthesis of meso-substituted porphyrins. By using very high concentrations, the use of solvent can be minimized, and the solvents that are used are less toxic. Also, expensive oxidants are avoided. The sustainability merits of the reaction are evident from its E Factor of 35; the lowest obtained for porphyrin synthesis thus far.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Redox-Initiated Hydrogel System for Detection and Real-Time Imaging of Cellulolytic Enzyme Activity (pages 2825–2831)

      Klara H. Malinowska, Tobias Verdorfer, Aylin Meinhold, Lukas F. Milles, Victor Funk, Prof. Dr. Hermann E. Gaub and Dr. Michael A. Nash

      Article first published online: 12 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402428

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      HyReS development: A hydrogel reagent signaling (HyReS) system converts oligosaccharides produced during biomass hydrolysis into a fluorescent hydrogel. This system for assaying cellulolytic enzyme activity serves as a versatile platform on both soluble and insoluble substrates. When combined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, it provides a spatially resolved method for chemical imaging of biomass degradation in real time.

    2. Efficient Water-Splitting Device Based on a Bismuth Vanadate Photoanode and Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells (pages 2832–2838)

      Lihao Han, Dr. Fatwa F. Abdi, Prof. Dr. Roel van de Krol, Dr. Rui Liu, Dr. Zhuangqun Huang, Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Lewerenz, Prof. Dr. Bernard Dam, Prof. Dr. Miro Zeman and Dr. Arno H. M. Smets

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402456

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      W-inning combination: A photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) water-splitting device based on a tungsten-doped bismuth vanadate photoanode and a thin-film silicon solar cell is reported. A record solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency for metal oxide based water-splitting devices is achieved by simultaneously enhancing light trapping in the photoanode and improving spectral utilization through the integration of a silicon solar cell.

    3. Rapid Double-Dye-Layer Coating for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells using a New Method (pages 2839–2844)

      Cho-long Jung, Chi-Hwan Han, Prof. Doo Kyung Moon and Prof. Yongseok Jun

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402232

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      Two dyes in a cell! Dye coating times on the TiO2 surface for dye-sensitized solar cells is minimized by employing solvent mixtures with high boiling points and suitable viscosities. Dye coating with high efficiency without degradation at high temperatures is achievable. Furthermore, this fast dye-coating method enables the fabrication of multilayer devices containing more than two dyes by controlling adsorption time at high temperatures.

    4. Gel-Derived Cation–π Stacking Films of Carbon Nanotube–Graphene Complexes as Oxygen Cathodes (pages 2845–2852)

      Dr. Tao Zhang, Dr. Hirofumi Matsuda and Prof. Haoshen Zhou

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402567

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      Well stacked: Carbon nanotube–graphene complexes are processed into finely crosslinked films based on their synchronous cation–π stacking interaction with ionic liquid molecules. The gel-derived film of single-layer graphene incorporating single-walled carbon nanotubes shows improved cycleability as O2 cathodes of Li–O2 batteries. Loading Ru nanoparticles into the film suppresses side reactions, stabilizing the whole cell architecture.

    5. Biomimetic Nanostructuring of Copper Thin Films Enhances Adhesion to the Negative Electrode Laminate in Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 2853–2858)

      Ziyan Zheng, Dr. Zhihui Wang, Xiangyun Song, Dr. Shidi Xun, Dr. Vincent Battaglia and Dr. Gao Liu

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402543

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      Let′s stick together: Delamination is a common cause of battery failure. Thin films of copper current collectors are nanostructured by chemical treatment to increase their adhesion to the anode. Nanorod arrays on the surface of treated copper current collectors are very similar to the structure of spatulas in a gecko's foot. The electrochemical performance of batteries using these electrodes is not compromised by the biomimetic modification.

    6. Environmentally-Friendly Lithium Recycling From a Spent Organic Li-Ion Battery (pages 2859–2867)

      Dr. Stéven Renault, Dr. Daniel Brandell and Prof. Kristina Edström

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402440

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      Pre-loved lithium: A simple method is investigated for recycling lithium from organic electrode materials for secondary lithium batteries. The method uses non-polluting solvents and a single thermal treatment step at moderate temperature. Up to 99 % of the capacity is retained with the recycled materials. Moreover, only a moderate quantity of lithium is lost during the course of the complete procedure.

    7. A Facile and Green Method to Hydrophobize Films of Cellulose Nanofibrils and Silica by Laccase-Mediated Coupling of Nonpolar Colloidal Particles (pages 2868–2878)

      Dr. Oriol Cusola, Prof. M. Blanca Roncero, Prof. Teresa Vidal and Prof. Orlando J. Rojas

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402432

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      Multicomponent colloids: Hydrophobic particles based on dodecyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate are coupled onto the surface of cellulose nanofibrils and silica by treatment with a multicomponent colloidal system derived from a laccase-mediated reaction in the presence of a sulfonated lignin. The resulting micro- and nanostructures on the surfaces are effective for cellulose hydrophobization.

    8. New Organic Donor–Acceptor–π–Acceptor Sensitizers for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells and Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution under Visible-Light Irradiation (pages 2879–2888)

      Xing Li, Dr. Shicong Cui, Dan Wang, Ying Zhou, Hao Zhou, Yue Hu, Prof. Jin-gang Liu, Prof. Yitao Long, Dr. Wenjun Wu, Prof. Jianli Hua and Prof. He Tian

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402414

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      Sensitive to different needs: Two organic donor–acceptor–π–acceptor sensitizers (AQ and AP) with quinoxaline/pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine as the auxiliary acceptor are described. These sensitizers are used in dye-sensitized solar cells and as photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution under visible-light irradiation (420 nm<λ<780 nm).

    9. Nickel Complex with Internal Bases as Efficient Molecular Catalyst for Photochemical H2 Production (pages 2889–2897)

      Yong Yang, Prof. Mei Wang, Liqin Xue, Fengbo Zhang, Lin Chen, Dr. Mårten S. G. Ahlquist and Prof. Licheng Sun

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402381

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      Nickel is the answer: A noble-metal-free molecular system that comprises a Ni complex that bears internal bases, fluorescein as a cheap light harvester, and triethylamine, displays a turnover number up to 3230 in H2 evolution in aqueous solutions.

    10. Multiple Cathodic Reaction Mechanisms in Seawater Cathodic Biofilms Operating in Sediment Microbial Fuel Cells (pages 2898–2906)

      Dr. Jerome T. Babauta, Lewis Hsu, Erhan Atci, Jeff Kagan, Bart Chadwick and Haluk Beyenal

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402377

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      Microsensors and biocathodes: Biofilms form on cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells operating in sea water. These cathodic biofilms enhance the performance through different mechanisms. Two regions of limiting current in the biocathodes can be identified using cyclic voltammetry. By placing dissolved oxygen and pH microsensors at the biocathode surface, it is possible to distinguish between the two different cathodic reaction mechanisms operating simultaneously.

    11. Palladium Nanoparticles Supported on Vertically Oriented Reduced Graphene Oxide for Methanol Electro-Oxidation (pages 2907–2913)

      Liming Yang, Dr. Yanhong Tang, Prof. Shenglian Luo, Prof. Chengbin Liu, Hejie Song and Dafeng Yan

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402352

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      Making reduced graphene oxide stand: A one-step electrochemical deposition is presented to prepare vertically oriented graphene oxide (VrGO) from graphene oxide solution. The vertical orientation is achieved by the assistance of metal nanoparticles. The VrGO electrocatalyst support is superior to its flat counterpart.

    12. In Situ Encapsulation of Germanium Clusters in Carbon Nanofibers: High-Performance Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 2914–2922)

      Wei Wang, Ying Xiao, Xia Wang, Bing Liu and Prof. Minhua Cao

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402304

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      Home-grown talent: Hybrids materials, comprising in situ-grown germanium nanoparticles embedded within nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (Ge/N-CNFs), are prepared by using an electrospinning method. The Ge/N-CNFs are highly efficient anode materials when used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The Ge/N-CNFs hybrids exhibit excellent lithium storage performance in terms of specific capacity, cycling stability, and rate capability.

    13. Diglycerol-Based Polyesters: Melt Polymerization with Hydrophobic Anhydrides (pages 2923–2929)

      Dr. Deivasagayam Dakshinamoorthy, Allison K. Weinstock, Prof. Krishnan Damodaran, Dr. David F. Iwig and Prof. Robert T. Mathers

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402249

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      Replacing petroleum-based chemicals: Plant-based diglycerol polymerizes with bio-derived anhydride monomers to satisfy most of the 12 principles of green chemistry. The ambient temperature monomer synthesis, low E factors (<2), large amount of bio-based content (>75 %), solvent free polymerization, and polymer degradability represent key factors in the design of these hydrophobic polyesters.

    14. Thiocyanate-Free Ruthenium(II) Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on the Cobalt Redox Couple (pages 2930–2938)

      Dr. Kuan-Lin Wu, Dr. John N. Clifford, Sheng-Wei Wang, Dr. Yella Aswani, Prof. Emilio Palomares, Maria Grazia Lobello, Edoardo Mosconi, Prof. Filippo De Angelis, Wan-Ping Ku, Prof. Yun Chi, Dr. Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin and Prof. Michael Grätzel

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402030

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      Co-ping with being sensitive: Two thiocyanate-free ruthenium(II) sensitizers, TFRS-41 and TFRS-42 with distinctive dialkoxyphenyl thienyl substituents are tested for potential applications in dye-sensitized solar cells with a [Co(bpy)3]2+/3+-based (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine) electrolyte. Through proper control of peripheral substituents good cell performance characteristics are recorded for sensitizer TFRS-42.

    15. Enabling LiTFSI-based Electrolytes for Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries by Using Linear Fluorinated Carbonates as (Co)Solvent (pages 2939–2946)

      Julian Kalhoff, Dominic Bresser, Marco Bolloli, Dr. Fannie Alloin, Prof. Jean-Yves Sanchez and Prof. Stefano Passerini

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402502

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      LiTFSI for safety: The utilization of LiTFSI as electrolyte salt in lithium-ion batteries is enabled by the use of fluorinated carbonates, which form a protective aluminum fluoride film on the current collector surface that avoids anodic dissolution. Electrochemical characterization of state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells with these new electrolyte solvents reveals that they allow to replace toxic LiPF6 by the chemically and thermally stable and safer LiTFSI as conductive electrolyte salt.

    16. Obtaining Spruce Hemicelluloses of Desired Molar Mass by using Pressurized Hot Water Extraction (pages 2947–2953)

      Jussi V. Rissanen, Dr. Henrik Grénman, Dr. Chunlin Xu, Prof. Stefan Willför, Prof. Dmitry Yu Murzin and Prof. Tapio Salmi

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402282

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      Let's spruce things up! The yield and average molar mass of hemicelluloses extracted from spruce sapwood by using pressurized hot water extraction is investigated in a cascade reactor. The influence of extraction time, temperature, pH, and chip size on extraction and hydrolysis are studied. The experimental conditions influence dramatically the molar mass of the extracted hemicelluloses with results ranging from 2 to >60 kg mol−1.

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