ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 11

November 2014

Volume 7, Issue 11

Pages 2957–3176

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Molecular Basis for the High CO2 Adsorption Capacity of Chabazite Zeolites (ChemSusChem 11/2014) (page 2957)

      Trong D. Pham, Dr. Matthew R. Hudson, Dr. Craig M. Brown and Prof. Dr. Raul F. Lobo

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402953

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      The Front Cover illustrates the migration of CO2 molecules from the earth atmosphere into the interior of the chabazite zeolite structure (displayed on the top right of the image). This structure shows the location of CO2 inside the zeolite pores, one (green–black) connected to the cation (in light blue) and another (yellow–black) located inside a “small window” (an 8-membered ring separating different cages). The high CO2 adsorption capacity of chabazite zeolites was investigated using in situ powder diffraction. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Pham et al. on page 3031 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402555), while more information about the research group is available in the Cover Profile (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402954).

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      Inside Cover: Rationalization of Dye Uptake on Titania Slides for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by a Combined Chemometric and Structural Approach (ChemSusChem 11/2014) (page 2958)

      Dr. Valentina Gianotti, Giada Favaro, Luca Bonandini, Dr. Luca Palin, Dr. Gianluca Croce, Dr. Enrico Boccaleri, Dr. Emma Artuso, Dr. Wouter van Beek, Dr. Claudia Barolo and Dr. Marco Milanesio

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402978

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      The Inside Cover picture underlines the link between solar energy and a sustainable economy. The sunny sky represents the environment in which we live and the dye-sensitized solar cell one of the tesserae needed to build the puzzle of a sustainable future. The optimization of DSC modules is facilitated through the chemical sciences represented by the molecule of D5, the topic of the paper, and through a deep comprehension of the molecular mechanism, represented by the 3D energetic landscape obtained by a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Gianotti et al. on page 3039 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402194).

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      Inside Back Cover: Direct Hydrogenation of Biomass-Derived Butyric Acid to n-Butanol over a Ruthenium–Tin Bimetallic Catalyst (ChemSusChem 11/2014) (page 3177)

      Dr. Jong-Min Lee, Dr. Pravin P. Upare, Prof. Jong-San Chang, Dr. Young Kyu Hwang, Jeong Ho Lee, Dr. Dong Won Hwang, Dr. Do-Young Hong, Dr. Seung Hwan Lee, Myung-Geun Jeong, Prof. Young Dok Kim and Prof. Young-Uk Kwon

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402853

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      The Back Inside Cover picture shows an important method for the production of bioalcohols. The method relies on a hybrid conversion process that is based on the combination of selective hydrogenation of bio-based organic carboxylic acids with the fermentation of biomass to the corresponding acids. A powerful strategy would be the use of direct hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids without having to use additional esterification processes. To achieve this powerful strategy, it is necessary to adopt effective hydrogenation catalysts to produce yields of bioalcohols above 95% without deactivation of the catalyst. More details on this strategy can be found in the Communication by Jong-San Chang on page 2998 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402311).

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      Back Cover: Engineering the Electrochemical Capacitive Properties of Graphene Sheets in Ionic-Liquid Electrolytes by Correct Selection of Anions (ChemSusChem 11/2014) (page 3178)

      Minjie Shi, Prof. Shengzhong Kou and Prof. Xingbin Yan

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402974

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      The Back Cover picture shows the electrochemical double layer capacitor behavior of graphene sheets in ionic liquids. In these ionic liquids the same cation has been coupled with different anions. Prof. Yan et al. systematically studied the relationship between the anion characteristics of ionic liquids and the electrochemical performance of graphene sheets. Moreover, they deeply analyzed the inherent reason and the mechanism influencing energy density and cycling stability of graphene sheets in ionic liquids. More details can be found in their Full Paper on page 3053 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402275).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Molecular Basis for the High CO2 Adsorption Capacity of Chabazite Zeolites (page 2959)

      Trong D. Pham, Dr. Matthew R. Hudson, Dr. Craig M. Brown and Prof. Dr. Raul F. Lobo

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402954

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      “The adsorption sites ”look“ like substrate–enzyme key-and-lock molecular models, clearly revealing the molecular basis for adsorption…‥” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the cover image can be found on page 2959 (10.1002/cssc.201402954). View the Front Cover on page 2957 (10.1002/cssc.201402953).

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 11/2014 (pages 2960–2967)

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201490036

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 11/2014 (pages 2968–2969)

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201490037

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 11/2014 (pages 2970–2973)

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201481113

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  6. Review

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Nanostructured Tungsten Trioxide Thin Films Synthesized for Photoelectrocatalytic Water Oxidation: A review (pages 2974–2997)

      Tao Zhu, Dr. Meng Nan Chong and Prof. Eng Seng Chan

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402089

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      It′s all a matter of e: The synthesis of nanostructured WO3 to be used for photochemical water splitting using various electrochemical routes is reviewed. Key fundamental reaction mechanisms and various effects of synthesis methods and approaches on physical, chemical, optical, and photoelectrochemical properties of nanostructured WO3 are explained. Also, a summary of the current evaluation practices on the energy conversion efficiency of nanostructured WO3 is provided.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Direct Hydrogenation of Biomass-Derived Butyric Acid to n-Butanol over a Ruthenium–Tin Bimetallic Catalyst (pages 2998–3001)

      Dr. Jong-Min Lee, Dr. Pravin P. Upare, Prof. Jong-San Chang, Dr. Young Kyu Hwang, Jeong Ho Lee, Dr. Dong Won Hwang, Dr. Do-Young Hong, Dr. Seung Hwan Lee, Myung-Geun Jeong, Prof. Young Dok Kim and Prof. Young-Uk Kwon

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402311

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      True convert: A hybrid conversion process for the selective hydrogenation of butyric acid combined with fermentation of glucose is developed. Bimetallic ruthenium–tin catalysts supported on zinc oxide (Ru–Sn/ZnO) show good performance in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol, as well as good long-term performance.

    2. Metal–Nitrogen Doping of Mesoporous Carbon/Graphene Nanosheets by Self-Templating for Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts (pages 3002–3006)

      Shuang Li, Dr. Dongqing Wu, Dr. Haiwei Liang, Jinzuan Wang, Dr. Xiaodong Zhuang, Dr. Yiyong Mai, Dr. Yuezeng Su and Prof. Xinliang Feng

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402680

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      Double doping strategy: Highly efficient electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are prepared by a self-templating strategy. The strategy yields carbon/graphene nanosheets that are doped by both transition metals and nitrogen, having a unique two-dimensional morphology and tunable meso-scale porosity. The as-prepared iron–cobalt catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the ORR and are stable in both alkaline and acidic media.

    3. Silicon Nanowire Photocathodes for Light-Driven Electroenzymatic Synthesis (pages 3007–3011)

      Dr. Sahng Ha Lee, Gyeong Min Ryu, Dong Heon Nam, Dr. Jae Hong Kim and Prof. Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402469

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      Photoelectroenzymatic synthesis: A photoelectrochemical NADH regeneration system is realized by using platinum nanoparticle-decorated, p-type silicon nanowires (Pt-SiNWs) as a photocathode. Pt-SiNWs enable an efficient electron transfer from an electrode to NAD+, which facilitates photoelectroenzymatic synthesis of L-glutamate at a low applied potential. This approach is applicable to a wide range of cofactor-dependent redox enzymatic synthesis without the requirement of sacrificial electron donors.

    4. Iron-Catalyzed Synthesis of Secondary Amines: On the Way to Green Reductive Aminations (pages 3012–3016)

      Tobias Stemmler, Dr. Annette-Enrika Surkus, Dr. Marga-Martina Pohl, Dr. Kathrin Junge and Prof. Matthias Beller

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402413

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      A well-defined carbon-supported iron-based catalyst is investigated for a one-pot multistep synthesis of secondary amines. The reductive amination of aldehydes includes the industrially relevant hydrogenation of nitroarenes to functionalized anilines as well as the conclusive reduction of the formed Schiff base. The catalytic activity of this cheap, promising catalyst is caused by a core–shell-structured iron oxide nanocomposite, which is encapsulated by individually nitrogen-enriched graphene-type layers.

    5. Assessing the Utility of Bipolar Membranes for use in Photoelectrochemical Water-Splitting Cells (pages 3017–3020)

      Nella M. Vargas-Barbosa, Dr. Geoffrey M. Geise, Prof. Michael A. Hickner and Prof. Thomas E. Mallouk

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402535

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      Use your ′branes: A bipolar membrane enables high- and low-pH solutions to be used on two sides of a water electrolysis cell. Steady-state membrane and solution resistances, electrode overpotentials, and pH gradients are measured at current densities relevant to solar photoelectrolysis, revealing that overall losses in a bipolar membrane-based cell can be minimized when strongly acidic and basic electrolytes are used on the cathode and anode sides of the cell, respectively.

    6. Use of Bipolar Membranes for Maintaining Steady-State pH Gradients in Membrane-Supported, Solar-Driven Water Splitting (pages 3021–3027)

      Michael B. McDonald, Prof. Shane Ardo, Prof. Nathan S. Lewis and Prof. Michael S. Freund

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402288

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      Grad students: Bipolar membranes are capable of maintaining a pH gradient, which can realize the introduction of novel earth-abundant catalysts into solar-driven water-splitting devices. A device configuration involving bipolar membrane-supported photoelectrode arrays is proposed with two different pH on each side, and materials to minimize the membrane overpotential and meet solar requirements simultaneously are discussed.

    7. Novel Pathways to 2,5-Dimethylfuran via Biomass-Derived 5-(Chloromethyl)furfural (pages 3028–3030)

      Dr. Saikat Dutta and Prof. Mark Mascal

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402702

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      Fueling the revolution: 2,5-Dimethylfuran (DMF), a promising biofuel and key precursor for the production of renewable para-xylene, is synthesized under mild conditions and in high yield from biomass-derived 5-(chloromethyl)furfural (CMF) via hydrogenolysis of acetal and imine intermediates.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Molecular Basis for the High CO2 Adsorption Capacity of Chabazite Zeolites (pages 3031–3038)

      Trong D. Pham, Dr. Matthew R. Hudson, Dr. Craig M. Brown and Prof. Dr. Raul F. Lobo

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402555

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      Window of opportunity: Li, Na, K, and Si chabazite zeolites were investigated by in situ powder diffraction. Two adsorption sites for CO2 were found in all samples with CO2 adsorption in the 8-membered ring window being dominant with end-on coordination to alkali-metal cations also observed. Li and Na chabazite with Si/Al=6 have adsorption capacity comparable to low-silica commercial faujasite and linde type A zeolite at ambient temperature and pressure.

    2. Rationalization of Dye Uptake on Titania Slides for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by a Combined Chemometric and Structural Approach (pages 3039–3052)

      Dr. Valentina Gianotti, Giada Favaro, Luca Bonandini, Dr. Luca Palin, Dr. Gianluca Croce, Dr. Enrico Boccaleri, Dr. Emma Artuso, Dr. Wouter van Beek, Dr. Claudia Barolo and Dr. Marco Milanesio

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402194

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      Live and let dye: A polyene-diphenylaniline dye (D5) for dye-sensitized solar cells is studied by a combination of XRD, theoretical calculations, and spectroscopic/chemometric methods. These data allow us to characterize the driving forces that govern D5 uptake and grafting, to infer the most likely arrangement of the D5 molecules on TiO2, and to understand the aggregation phenomena suggested by the chemometric study.

    3. Engineering the Electrochemical Capacitive Properties of Graphene Sheets in Ionic-Liquid Electrolytes by Correct Selection of Anions (pages 3053–3062)

      Minjie Shi, Prof. Shengzhong Kou and Prof. Xingbin Yan

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402275

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      What a way to behave! The electrochemical behavior of graphene sheets (GSs) in a series of ionic liquids (ILs) with the same cation and different anions is systematically studied. Viscosity, ion size, and molecular weight of the ILs all affect the electrochemical characteristics of GSs.

    4. Multifunctional Pd/Ni–Co Catalyst for Hydrogen Production by Chemical Looping Coupled With Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid (pages 3063–3077)

      Dr. Javier Fermoso, Dr. María V. Gil, Dr. Fernando Rubiera and Prof. De Chen

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402675

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      Combined power for hydrogen: High-purity H2 is obtained from the sorption-enhanced steam reforming (SESR) of biomass-derived compounds. A Ni–Co catalyst derived from a hydrotalcite-like material has been promoted with Pd to eliminate the catalyst reduction step after regeneration of the CO2 sorbent with air. Thus, the proposed Pd/Ni–Co HT catalyst may function as an oxygen carrier in a chemical loop coupled to the SESR process, supplying heat in situ for the regeneration reaction.

    5. Operando and In situ X-ray Spectroscopies of Degradation in La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3−δ Thin Film Cathodes in Fuel Cells (pages 3078–3087)

      Samson Y. Lai, Dr. Dong Ding, Dr. Mingfei Liu, Prof. Meilin Liu and Prof. Faisal M. Alamgir

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402670

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      Phantom of the operando: Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy together formulate a deeper understanding of how water vapor and carbon dioxide instigate degradation in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes during operation. The results from the operando experiment are distinctly different compared to the combined results of the individual in situ experiments, emphasizing the uniqueness of operando experiments.

    6. Lead Methylammonium Triiodide Perovskite-Based Solar Cells: An Interfacial Charge-Transfer Investigation (pages 3088–3094)

      Xiaobao Xu, Hua Zhang, Kun Cao, Jin Cui, Jianfeng Lu, Xianwei Zeng, Prof. Yan Shen and Prof. Mingkui Wang

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402566

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      Recombining holes and electrons: CH3NH3PbI3-based p–n heterojunction solar cells with anatase TiO2 nanocuboids, in combination with carbon as a counter electrode, are described. The effect of 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9-spirobifluorene as a hole-transport material is also investigated.

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      Zinc-Assisted Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-Dimethylfuran (pages 3095–3101)

      Dr. Basudeb Saha, Christine M. Bohn and Prof. Dr. Mahdi M. Abu-Omar

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402530

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      Are you thinking what I′m zincing? The addition of zinc salt enhances the catalytic effectiveness of a palladium–carbon (Pd/C) catalyst in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) into 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) by a factor of more than 3. The finding allows to use catalysts with less palladium. The synergistic effect of the zinc salt with different hydrodeoxygenation catalysts is compared to elucidate the role of the zinc component.

    8. Cube-like α-Fe2O3 Supported on Ordered Multimodal Porous Carbon as High Performance Electrode Material for Supercapacitors (pages 3102–3111)

      Dr. Nitin K. Chaudhari, Dr. Sudeshna Chaudhari and Prof. Jong-Sung Yu

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402526

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      Cubed iron for storage: Synthesis of cube-like α-Fe2O3 supported on OMPC is presented through a facile solution-based mild hydrothermal route using glycine. As an electrode material for supercapacitors, the as-synthesized α-Fe2O3/OMPC composite demonstrates high specific capacitance, excellent rate capability, and good cycling stability, which are ascribed to the favorable synergistic interaction between cube-like α-Fe2O3 and uniform hierarchically nanostructured OMPC with high surface area as support in the composite.

    9. Nano-Sized Quaternary CuGa2In3S8 as an Efficient Photocatalyst for Solar Hydrogen Production (pages 3112–3121)

      Dr. Tarek A. Kandiel, Dr. Dalaver H. Anjum and Prof. Kazuhiro Takanabe

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402525

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      Lighting the way to H2: Quaternary CuGa2In3S8 photocatalysts with a primary particle size of ≈4 nm are synthesized using a facile hot-injection method by fine-tuning the sulfur source injection temperature and aging time. Under optimized conditions, the 1.0 wt % Ru-loaded CuGa2In3S8 photocatalyst exhibits a photocatalytic H2 evolution response up to 700 nm and an apparent quantum efficiency of (6.9±0.5) % at 560 nm.

    10. Immobilized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as Stable and Reusable Catalysts for Hydrazine-Mediated Nitro Reductions in Continuous Flow (pages 3122–3131)

      Mojtaba Mirhosseini Moghaddam, Bartholomäus Pieber, Dr. Toma Glasnov and Prof. Dr. C. Oliver Kappe

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402455

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      Support it! A simple and convenient experimental procedure for the effective immobilization of Fe3O4 nanocrystals on alumina is presented. This supported catalyst shows excellent behavior for reduction of nitroarenes to anilines in continuous-flow formats over a prolonged time period at high productivity rates without leaching of the catalyst.

    11. Gluconic Acid from Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oils: Specialty Chemicals from the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass (pages 3132–3137)

      Dr. Daniel Santhanaraj, Dr. Marjorie R. Rover, Prof. Daniel E. Resasco, Prof. Robert C. Brown and Prof. Steven Crossley

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402431

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      Chemicals from pyrolysis: We demonstrate the production of gluconic acid from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. Because a relatively clean anhydrosugar solution is obtained, a simple contact with activated carbon removes the impurities to produce gluconic acid. The purity of the stream offers potential for long catalyst lifetimes, with no measurable decrease in catalyst activity after oxidation.

    12. Scalable Integration of Li5FeO4 towards Robust, High-Performance Lithium-Ion Hybrid Capacitors (pages 3138–3144)

      Dr. Min-Sik Park, Young-Geun Lim, Dr. Soo Min Hwang, Prof. Jung Ho Kim, Prof. Jeom-Soo Kim, Prof. Shi Xue Dou, Prof. Jaephil Cho and Dr. Young-Jun Kim

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402397

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      Lithium sourcing: A single-phase Li5FeO4 is developed, which features a large first charge capacity (Li+ extraction) and irreversibility for efficient Li+ predoping into the negative electrode. The unique properties of Li5FeO4 render it an excellent lithium-source additive. This innovative strategy provides an effective solution for improving the volumetric energy density as well as the safety of lithium-ion hybrid capacitors.

    13. Aminosilanes Grafted to Basic Alumina as CO2 Adsorbents—Role of Grafting Conditions on CO2 Adsorption Properties (pages 3145–3156)

      Dr. Sumit Bali, Dr. Johannes Leisen, Guo Shiou Foo, Prof. Carsten Sievers and Prof. Christopher W. Jones

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402373

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      Catch that carbon: Solid-oxide-supported amine sorbents for CO2 capture are amongst the most rapidly developing classes of sorbent materials for CO2 capture. Basic γ-alumina supports are used as hosts for amine sites through the grafting of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane to the alumina surface under a variety of conditions to yield the expected surface-grafted alkylamine groups.

    14. Synthesis of 1,4:3,6-Dianhydrohexitols Diesters from the Palladium-Catalyzed Hydroesterification Reaction (pages 3157–3163)

      Dr. Romain Pruvost, Jérôme Boulanger, Dr. Bastien Léger, Prof. Anne Ponchel, Prof. Eric Monflier, Dr. Mathias Ibert, Prof. André Mortreux, Dr. Thomas Chenal and Prof. Mathieu Sauthier

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402584

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      An ester is born: The hydroesterification of α-olefins with isosorbide allows a straightforward access to diesters according to a catalytic and highly atom-economical pathway. With optimized reaction conditions, the diesters can be synthesized selectively with high yields using a palladium catalyst. The reaction conditions can be scaled up to 100-gram-scale synthesis under solvent-free conditions.

    15. From Gene Towards Selective Biomass Valorization: Bacterial β-Etherases with Catalytic Activity on Lignin-Like Polymers (pages 3164–3171)

      Dr. Pere Picart, Christoph Müller, Jakob Mottweiler, Lotte Wiermans, Prof. Dr. Carsten Bolm, Dr. Pablo Domínguez de María and Prof. Dr. Anett Schallmey

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402465

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      Nature takes over: New β-etherases that display catalytic activity on lignin-like fluorescence-based polymers are described for the potential of these enzymes to cleave C[BOND]O bonds selectively in macromolecules. Upon optimization of both the biocatalyst and process setup, future lignin valorization strategies are foreseeable.

    16. Continuous-Flow Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis: A Revolutionary Reduction of the Amino Acid Excess (pages 3172–3176)

      Dr. István M. Mándity, Balázs Olasz, Dr. Sándor B. Ötvös and Prof. Dr. Ferenc Fülöp

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402436

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      Pep talk: A highly efficient continuous-flow technique for the synthesis of peptides is reported. The method uses only 1.5 equivalents of amino acid during coupling, while yielding virtually quantitative conversions, allowing to incorporate exotic and expensive artificial amino acids in a highly economic and more sustainable manner.

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