ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 5

Special Issue: The Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage

May 2014

Volume 7, Issue 5

Pages 1197–1489

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Coaxial Carbon/Metal Oxide/Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays as High-Performance Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries (ChemSusChem 5/2014) (page 1197)

      Dr. Fengliu Lou, Dr. Haitao Zhou, Dr. Trung Dung Tran, Marthe Emelie Melandsø Buan, Prof. Fride Vullum-Bruer, Prof. Magnus Rønning, Prof. John Charles Walmsley and Prof. De Chen

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Cover Picture shows how the aggregation of carbon/metal oxide core–shell arrays used as anodes for lithium ion batteries can be avoided by externally coating carbon to form carbon/metal oxide/carbon sandwich arrays. The volume of the metal oxide film is enlarged significantly during lithiation because of its high lithium ion storage capacity. This results in the formation of an interface between the adjacent metal oxide films, which causes aggregation and thus capacity fading. External carbon coating is a powerful strategy to suppress the formation of this interface between metal oxides and thus prevent aggregation. The lithium ion storage performance is improved as a result of the external carbon layer, which increases the rate capability by enhancing electrical conductivity and maintaining a low mass-transfer resistance, and improves cyclic stability by avoiding aggregation and stabilizing the solid electrolyte interface. More detail is given in the Full Paper by Chen et al. on page 1335 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300461), while more information about the research group is available in the Cover Profile (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400094).

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover Picture: Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution from Glycerol and Water over Nickel-Hybrid Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots under Visible-Light Irradiation (ChemSusChem 5/2014) (page 1198)

      Jiu-Ju Wang, Dr. Zhi-Jun Li, Xu-Bing Li, Xiang-Bing Fan, Dr. Qing-Yuan Meng, Shan Yu, Cheng-Bo Li, Jia-Xin Li, Prof. Dr. Chen-Ho Tung and Prof. Dr. Li-Zhu Wu

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover shows a cheap, simple, and efficient artificial photocatalyst, nickel-hybrid CdS quantum dots (Nih-CdS QDs), developed by Wu et al. for conversion of glycerol to H2 under visible light irradiation. The photocatalyst, formed in situ from 3-mercaptopropionic acid-CdS quantum dots and Ni2+ ions, is capable of producing H2 at pH values ranging from 5 to 9, and shows the highest photocatalytic activity known to date for H2 evolution from the relatively inert biomass glycerol, which has a low market price, in aqueous solutions. More details can be found in the Full Paper on page 1468 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400028).

    3. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Zr4+ Doping in Li4Ti5O12 Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries: Open Li+ Diffusion Paths through Structural Imperfection (ChemSusChem 5/2014) (page 1490)

      Jae-Geun Kim, Dr. Min-Sik Park, Dr. Soo Min Hwang, Prof. Yoon-Uk Heo, Dr. Ting Liao, Dr. Ziqi Sun, Jong Hwan Park, Dr. Ki Jae Kim, Dr. Goojin Jeong, Dr. Young-Jun Kim, Prof. Jung Ho Kim and Prof. Shi Xue Dou

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400095

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The back cover shows an envisagement of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) as a promising energy storage system encompassing a wide range of fields, including portable devices such as mobile phones and laptops, as well as electrically powered automobiles and the storage of electrical energy generated by solar panels or wind turbines. Prof. Jung Ho Kim and co-workers provide an atomic insight into Zr4+ doping in a one-dimensional Li4Ti5O12 nanofiber anode for high-performance LIBs based on theoretical and experimental investigations. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Kim et al. on page 1451 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301393).

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      The Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage (pages 1199–1200)

      Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su 

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      What′s in store: The sustainable development of our society requires the conversion and storage of renewable energy, and these should be scaled up to serve the global primary energy consumption. This special issue on “The Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage”, assembled by guest editor Dangsheng Su, contains papers dealing with these aspects, and highlights important developments in the chemistry of energy conversion and storage during the last two years.

  3. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Coaxial Carbon/Metal Oxide/Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays as High-Performance Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries (page 1201)

      Dr. Fengliu Lou, Dr. Haitao Zhou, Dr. Trung Dung Tran, Marthe Emelie Melandsø Buan, Prof. Fride Vullum-Bruer, Prof. Magnus Rønning, Prof. John Charles Walmsley and Prof. De Chen

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400094

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “Carbon/metal oxide/carbon sandwich arrays were designed and synthesized for the first time as anode for lithium ion batteries…….” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the cover image can be found on page 1335 (10.1002/cssc.201300461. View the front cover on page 1197).

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 5/2014 (page 1213)

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201490019

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. Fischer–Tropsch Reaction on a Thermally Conductive and Reusable Silicon Carbide Support (pages 1218–1239)

      Dr. Yuefeng Liu, Prof. Ovidiu Ersen, Dr. Christian Meny, Dr. Francis Luck and Dr. Cuong Pham-Huu

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300921

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eliminating the hot spot: Thermally conductive materials are explored as catalyst supports in the strongly exothermic Fischer–Tropsch (FT) process, which is a key method used in the conversion of natural gas, coal, and biomass into clean fuels. The role that the β-SiC- or carbon-based conductive support plays in the improved performance of the FT reaction in terms of long-term stability and long-chain hydrocarbon selectivity are evaluated.

  8. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. Substitutional Doping of Carbon Nanotubes with Heteroatoms and Their Chemical Applications (pages 1240–1250)

      Dr. Yexin Zhang, Prof. Dr. Jian Zhang and Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301166

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hit the target! The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be tuned by substitutional doping with heteroatoms (B and/or N) for different applications. Based on the comprehensive understanding of the substitutional doping of CNTs, it should be possible to deliberately design doped CNTs for specific purposes.

    2. Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts for the Production of Hydrocarbon Fuels with High Selectivity (pages 1251–1264)

      Prof. Dr. Qinghong Zhang, Kang Cheng, Dr. Jincan Kang, Dr. Weiping Deng and Prof. Dr. Ye Wang

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300797

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Split personality: Bifunctional catalysts containing both active metal (metal carbide) nanoparticles for CO hydrogenation and acid sites for hydrocracking/isomerization are very promising for the selective production of gasoline or diesel fuel (see picture). The control of secondary reactions by using new solid-acid materials, such as mesoporous zeolites, leads to outstanding product selectivity.

    3. Functionalized Graphene-Based Cathode for Highly Reversible Lithium–Sulfur Batteries (pages 1265–1273)

      Jin Won Kim, Joey D. Ocon, Dr. Dong-Won Park and Prof. Jaeyoung Lee

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300782

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene again: Moving beyond Li ion chemistry to produce batteries that are safer, less expensive, operate longer, and have greater energy density has long been the holy grail in the field of electrochemistry and energy research. Herein, we highlight the challenges in the development of S cathodes in Li S batteries (LSB) and argue why functionalized graphene–S or graphene-oxide–S composites might be the solution to finally push LSB towards commercialization.

  9. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. CO2 Recycling: A Key Strategy to Introduce Green Energy in the Chemical Production Chain (pages 1274–1282)

      Prof. Siglinda Perathoner and Prof. Gabriele Centi

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300926

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Measuring up: The introduction of renewable energy in the chemical production chain is a key strategic factor both to realize a sustainable, resource-efficient, low-carbon economy and society and to drive innovation and competiveness in the chemical production. Carbon dioxide (CO2) recycling is one possible option. This Concept discusses this concept in terms of motivations, perspectives, and impact as well as technical barriers to achieve this goal.

  10. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. History Effects in Lithium–Oxygen Batteries: How Initial Seeding Influences the Discharge Capacity (pages 1283–1288)

      Dr. Ali Rinaldi, Olivia Wijaya, Prof. Harry E. Hoster and Dr. Denis Y. W. Yu

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300986

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      History lesson: The discharge product will at some point form the surface of the ongoing electrochemical reaction in Li–O2 battery. The nature of Li2O2 deposits are crucial for a battery's capacity performance. The discharge profiles of carbon cathodes that are precovered by Li2O2 seed layers are compared. The layers are Coulometrically equal but are deposited at varying deposition rates, and demonstrate how faster initial seeding leads to lower total discharge capacities.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. Excavated Fe-N-C Sites for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity in the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (pages 1289–1294)

      Beomgyun Jeong, Dongyoon Shin, Dr. Hongrae Jeon, Joey D. Ocon, Prof. Bongjin Simon Mun, Dr. Jaeyoon Baik, Dr. Hyun-Joon Shin and Prof. Dr. Jaeyoung Lee

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301374

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pt-free ORR catalyst: Fe-modified N-doped carbon nanofibers (Fe-N-CNFs) are a promising non-Pt catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A pulverization approach to effectively excavate a larger number of active sites embedded in the Fe-N-CNFs for the ORR is possible. Facile ball milling results in a significant enhancement in the Fe-based ORR active sites and the corresponding ORR activity of the Fe-N-CNFs.

    2. Energetics of Defects on Graphene through Fluorination (pages 1295–1300)

      Dr. Jie Xiao, Dr. Praveen Meduri, Honghao Chen, Dr. Zhiguo Wang, Dr. Fei Gao, Dr. Jianzhi Hu, Dr. Ju Feng, Mary Hu, Dr. Sheng Dai, Dr. Suree Brown, Dr. Jamie L. Adcock, Dr. Zhiqun Deng, Dr. Jun Liu, Dr. Gordon L. Graff, Dr. Ilhan A. Aksay and Dr. Ji-Guang Zhang

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Energetics of defects on graphene: The chemical composition and structural evolution of graphene during fluorination is investigated by a combination of experiments and theoretical simulations, which provides a novel method to study defect chemistry. In a model electrode, the energy/power ratio of as-prepared fluorinated graphene is tunable by modifying the C/F ratio, demonstrating both an informative fundamental phenomenon as well as a promising practical use for energy storage

    3. Water Oxidation by Amorphous Cobalt-Based Oxides: Volume Activity and Proton Transfer to Electrolyte Bases (pages 1301–1310)

      Katharina Klingan, Franziska Ringleb, Dr. Ivelina Zaharieva, Jonathan Heidkamp, Dr. Petko Chernev, Diego Gonzalez-Flores, Dr. Marcel Risch, Dr. Anna Fischer and Prof. Dr. Holger Dau

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's what's inside that counts! Amorphous oxides are a high-interest material class in energy science. Rather than at the outer surface, catalysis of water oxidation by an amorphous cobalt oxide takes place inside the hydrated oxide material. Unprotonated buffer molecules of the electrolyte solution are likely to pick up protons at the surface of the catalyst material (see picture).

    4. Hydrogenolysis of Cellulose over Cu-Based Catalysts—Analysis of the Reaction Network (pages 1311–1317)

      Dr. Kameh Tajvidi, Dr. Peter J. C. Hausoul and Prof. Dr. Regina Palkovits

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300978

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the web: A series of polyols and carbohydrates with increasing carbon-chain length as well as cellulose are screened in the CuO/ZnO/Al2O3-catalyzed hydrogenolysis reaction. Analysis of the obtained product mixtures provides insight into the reaction network. For cellulose, an additional depolymerization mechanism is proposed to account for the observed product distribution.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Composite Materials for Thermal Energy Storage: Enhancing Performance through Microstructures (pages 1318–1325)

      Zhiwei Ge, Feng Ye and Prof. Yulong Ding

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300878

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      If you can't stand the heat: Interfacial energy differences in microstructured composite thermal energy storage materials are used to manipulate the microstructures of the composites and achieve excellent thermal and chemical stabilities, good cyclic heating–cooling performance, and high energy storage density. High thermal conductivities are achieved through the addition of a highly thermal conductive carbon material.

    6. Base-Free Oxidation of Glycerol Using Titania-Supported Trimetallic Au–Pd–Pt Nanoparticles (pages 1326–1334)

      Dr. Simon A. Kondrat, Dr. Peter J. Miedziak, Mark Douthwaite, Dr. Gemma L. Brett, Dr. Thomas E. Davies, Dr. David J. Morgan, Dr. Jennifer K. Edwards, David W. Knight, Prof. Christopher J. Kiely, Prof. Stuart H. Taylor and Prof. Graham J. Hutchings

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300834

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The noble trio: Base-free selective oxidation of glycerol is investigated using trimetallic Au–Pd–Pt nanoparticles supported on titania and their corresponding bimetallic catalysts. Increased activity is observed for the trimetallic Au–Pd–Pt/TiO2 catalyst, with retention of selectivity towards C3 products.

    7. Coaxial Carbon/Metal Oxide/Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays as High-Performance Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries (pages 1335–1346)

      Dr. Fengliu Lou, Dr. Haitao Zhou, Dr. Trung Dung Tran, Marthe Emelie Melandsø Buan, Prof. Fride Vullum-Bruer, Prof. Magnus Rønning, Prof. John Charles Walmsley and Prof. De Chen

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays provide it: Coaxial carbon/metal oxide/aligned carbon nanotube arrays over stainless-steel foil have been designed and tested as binder-free anodes for lithium ion batteries. The coaxial arrays show high performance in terms of initial Coulombic efficiency, capacity, stability, and rate capability. The outer carbon layer is a key component for high performance, and performance improvement mechanisms are investigated.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Two-Electron Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalyzed by Rhenium(I) Bis(imino)acenaphthene Carbonyl Complexes (pages 1347–1351)

      Engelbert Portenkirchner, Elham Kianfar, Prof. Dr. Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci and Prof. Dr. Günther Knör

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multielectron transfer catalysis: A series of deeply colored rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes with bis(imino)acenaphthene ligands (i.e., [Re(BIAN)(CO)3]Cl) is successfully tested as novel homogeneous catalysts for the two-electron reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO). Variation of the ligand substitution pattern in proximity to the metal center has a significant influence on the catalytic performance of these systems.

    2. Biphasic Catalytic Conversion of Fructose by Continuous Hydrogenation of HMF over a Hydrophobic Ruthenium Catalyst (pages 1352–1356)

      Yanliang Yang, Dr. Zhongtian Du, Dr. Jiping Ma, Dr. Fang Lu, Junjie Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jie Xu

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Divide and conquer: A method for direct catalytic conversion of fructose to tetrahydro-2,5-furandimethanol (THFDM) via 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) is reported. High selectivity towards THFDM is achieved by using a catalyst combination of acid and a hydrophobic ruthenium catalyst (Ru/SiO2-TM) in a water/cyclohexane biphasic system by continuous hydrogenation of generated HMF. The use of the hydrophobic Ru/SiO2-TM is the key, as it prevents hydrogenation of fructose to mannitol and sorbitol in the water phase.

    3. Cycloaddition of Carbon Dioxide and Epoxides using Pentaerythritol and Halides as Dual Catalyst System (pages 1357–1360)

      Michael E. Wilhelm, Michael H. Anthofer, Dr. Mirza Cokoja, Iulius I. E. Markovits, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301273

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doubleteam: The combination of pentaerytrithol with tetrabutylammonium iodide leads to an efficient catalytic system for the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide (CO2) with various epoxides to cyclic carbonates. The nontoxic, metalfree, and cost-efficient dual catalysts, as well as the easy recyclability result in an exceptional sustainable organocatalytic approach for the fixation of carbon dioxide.

  13. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Cover Profile
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Minireviews
    10. Concept
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    13. Communications
    14. Full Papers
    1. Photocatalysis with Chromium-Doped TiO2: Bulk and Surface Doping (pages 1361–1371)

      Dr. Samy Ould-Chikh, Dr. Olivier Proux, Dr. Pavel Afanasiev, Dr. Lhoussain Khrouz, Dr. Mohamed N. Hedhili, Dr. Dalaver H. Anjum, Dr. Moussab Harb, Dr. Christophe Geantet, Prof. Jean-Marie Basset and Dr. Eric Puzenat

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201300922

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's classified! The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two types of modified titania are discussed: one with CrIII doped in the bulk and one with CrOOH clusters on the TiO2 surface (see picture). Both series show visible-light-driven photo-oxidation activity. However, surface modification appears to be a more efficient strategy.

    2. Modeling Practical Performance Limits of Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Based on the Current State of Materials Research (pages 1372–1385)

      Linsey C. Seitz, Zhebo Chen, Arnold J. Forman, Blaise A. Pinaud, Jesse D. Benck and Prof. Thomas F. Jaramillo

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How efficient can it be? Based on the current state of materials research, we model various losses in photoelectrochemical water splitting, examining devices configured in several different ways, to determine their overall solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies. The effects of different absorber configurations and various losses are quantitatively analyzed, leading to the introduction of potential engineering solutions to overcome limitations of water-splitting systems.

    3. Easily Regenerable Solid Adsorbents Based on Polyamines for Carbon Dioxide Capture from the Air (pages 1386–1397)

      Dr. Alain Goeppert, Hang Zhang, Dr. Miklos Czaun, Robert B. May, Prof. G. K. Surya Prakash, Prof. George A. Olah and Prof. S. R. Narayanan

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As easy as breathing: Materials prepared from widely available fumed silica and polyethylenimines are used as efficient and inexpensive adsorbents for the capture of CO2 directly from the air (see picture). They can be easily regenerated under mild conditions for numerous adsorption/desorption cycles.

    4. Pt Nanocatalysts Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Selective Conversion of Cellulose or Cellobiose to Sorbitol (pages 1398–1406)

      Dr. Ding Wang, Dr. Wenqi Niu, Dr. Minghui Tan, Prof. Mingbo Wu, Prof. Xuejun Zheng, Dr. Yanpeng Li and Prof. Noritatsu Tsubaki

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301123

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Support group: Pt nanocatalysts loaded on reduced graphene oxide are prepared by a microwave-assisted ethylene glycol reduction method, and present high activity and selectivity for the conversion of cellobiose or cellulose to sorbitol. The high catalytic activity is attributed to the synergistic effects of reduced graphene oxide and the supported Pt nanoparticles.

    5. Four-Layer Tin–Carbon Nanotube Yolk–Shell Materials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 1407–1414)

      Peng Chen, Fengdan Wu and Prof. Dr. Yong Wang

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tinception: A four-layer yolk–shell tin–carbon (Sn–C) nanotube nanostructure for application in lithium-ion batteries is designed and successfully prepared by a SnO2 nanotube-mediated method. The complex structure, designed to withstand the large volume changes associated with the use of tin anodes, offers excellent lithium-ion storage properties in terms of high capacity, long cycle life, and high rate performance.

    6. The Pt-Enriched PtNi Alloy Surface and its Excellent Catalytic Performance in Hydrolytic Hydrogenation of Cellulose (pages 1415–1421)

      Guanfeng Liang, Limin He, Prof. Masahiko Arai and Prof. Fengyu Zhao

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301204

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Put a Pt on it: ZSM-5-supported PtNi alloy particles with Pt-enriched alloy surface are prepared and characterized. The Pt-enriched alloy surface enhances hydrogenation activity but suppresses hydrogenolysis activity, thus resulting in high yield of hexitols. The decoration with an alloy surface offers a new approach to prevent the rapid deactivation of Ni-based catalysts in hot-compressed water.

    7. Amphiphilic and Phase-Separable Ionic Liquids for Biomass Processing (pages 1422–1434)

      Ashley J. Holding, Mikko Heikkilä, Prof. Dr. Ilkka Kilpeläinen and Dr. Alistair W. T. King

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solving the dissolving: Hydrophobic wood-biopolymer-solvating ionic liquids are developed that are phase separable from aqueous solutions as a means of recycling. These ionic liquids are excellent solvents for cellulose in the form of their DMSO electrolyte solutions but only dissolve lignin as the pure ionic liquids.

    8. Construction of High-Energy-Density Supercapacitors from Pine-Cone-Derived High-Surface-Area Carbons (pages 1435–1442)

      Dr. Kaliyappan Karthikeyan, Samuthirapandiyan Amaresh, Sol Nip Lee, Prof. Xueliang Sun, Dr. Vanchiappan Aravindan, Dr. Young-Gi Lee and Prof. Yun Sung Lee

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301262

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pine cones: Not just for squirrels! Activated carbon with an ultrahigh surface area (∼3950 m2 g−1) was prepared from pine cone petals by using a chemical activation process for high-performance supercapacitor applications. The symmetric supercapacitor cell with such carbon electrodes delivered a discharge capacitance of ∼111 F g−1 with excellent capacitance retention.

    9. Entropically Favored Adsorption of Cellulosic Molecules onto Carbon Materials through Hydrophobic Functionalities (pages 1443–1450)

      Mizuho Yabushita, Dr. Hirokazu Kobayashi, Prof. Jun-ya Hasegawa, Dr. Kenji Hara and Prof. Atsushi Fukuoka

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dual friendship: Hydrophobic functionality provides the primary and strong driving forces for adsorbing cellulosic molecules onto carbons (see picture). The driving forces consist of entropically driven hydrophobic interactions and CH–π hydrogen bonds, and thus, carbons can adsorb cellulosic molecules even at the high temperatures required for the conversion of cellulose.

    10. Zr4+ Doping in Li4Ti5O12 Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries: Open Li+ Diffusion Paths through Structural Imperfection (pages 1451–1457)

      Jae-Geun Kim, Dr. Min-Sik Park, Dr. Soo Min Hwang, Prof. Yoon-Uk Heo, Dr. Ting Liao, Dr. Ziqi Sun, Jong Hwan Park, Dr. Ki Jae Kim, Dr. Goojin Jeong, Dr. Young-Jun Kim, Prof. Jung Ho Kim and Prof. Shi Xue Dou

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301393

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Distorted lattice: Zr4+ is doped into a 1 D spinel Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) nanostructure and the resulting electrochemical properties are explored through a combined theoretical and experimental investigation. The improved electrochemical performance resulting from incorporation of Zr4+ in the LTO is due to lattice distortion and, thereby, enlarged Li+ diffusion paths rather than to a change in the electronic structure.

    11. Electrochemical Performance of Hierarchical Porous Carbon Materials Obtained from the Infiltration of Lignin into Zeolite Templates (pages 1458–1467)

      R. Ruiz-Rosas, M. J. Valero-Romero, D. Salinas-Torres, J. Rodríguez-Mirasol, T. Cordero, E. Morallón and D. Cazorla-Amorós

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201301408

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No limit for lignin: Hierarchical micro-/mesoporous carbon materials are prepared by the liquid-phase impregnation of zeolites with an inexpensive and renewable biopolymer, lignin. High capacitances and an outstanding rate performance are obtained as a result of the ordered arrangement of porosity and the presence of certain electroactive surface oxygen and nitrogen groups.

    12. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution from Glycerol and Water over Nickel-Hybrid Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots under Visible-Light Irradiation (pages 1468–1475)

      Jiu-Ju Wang, Dr. Zhi-Jun Li, Xu-Bing Li, Xiang-Bing Fan, Dr. Qing-Yuan Meng, Shan Yu, Cheng-Bo Li, Jia-Xin Li, Prof. Dr. Chen-Ho Tung and Prof. Dr. Li-Zhu Wu

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400028

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In good Nick: A simple and robust photocatalyst based on hybrid cadmium sulfide quantum dots with nickel complex active sites (Nih-CdS QDs) enables the photocatalytic production of hydrogen (H2) from glycerol and water. Using the Nih-CdS QDs allows to achieve a high rate of H2 production as well as a high turnover number over 20 h of irradiation (λ>400 nm). The performance is the highest activity known to date for H2 production from glycerol by photocatalysis.

    13. Controlling the Size and Composition of Nanosized Pt–Ni Octahedra to Optimize Their Catalytic Activities toward the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (pages 1476–1483)

      Dr. Sang-Il Choi, Shuifen Xie, Dr. Minhua Shao, Dr. Ning Lu, Dr. Sandra Guerrero, Jonathan H. Odell, Jinho Park, Dr. Jinguo Wang, Prof. Moon J. Kim and Prof. Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400051

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Maximizing the catalytic activity: Nanosized Pt–Ni octahedra with a range of controlled sizes and compositions are synthesized. By adjusting the size and composition of the Pt–Ni octahedra, their catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction is optimized. The results of these studies may serve as a useful guideline for the future design and synthesis of advanced ORR catalysts based on Pt–Ni nanocrystals.

    14. Equimolar Carbon Absorption by Potassium Phthalimide and In Situ Catalytic Conversion Under Mild Conditions (pages 1484–1489)

      Dr. Shuai Zhang, Dr. Yu-Nong Li, Ya-Wei Zhang, Prof. Dr. Liang-Nian He, Bing Yu, Dr. Qing-Wen Song and Xian-Dong Lang

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201400133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a fix: Potassium phthalimide is as an excellent absorbent for equimolar CO2 capture with simultaneous activation. The in situ catalytic conversion of captured CO2 can be successfully converted into value-added chemicals and fuel-related products under mild conditions through a carbon capture and utilization pathway, rather than going through desorption process.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION