ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 12

June 22, 2015

Volume 8, Issue 12

Pages 1989–2137

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Hydrogen Production from Aqueous Solutions of Urea with Ruthenium-based Catalysts (ChemSusChem 12/2015) (page 1989)

      Dr. Shinya Furukawa, Ryohei Suzuki, Kazuyoshi Ochi, Prof. Tatsuaki Yashima and Prof. Takayuki Komatsu

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500618

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Cover picture shows that urea molecules can be effectively converted into H2, N2, and CO2 in the presence of water and Ru/Al2O3 as catalyst. This highly efficient catalytic system produces hydrogen with high yield (92 %) at 500 °C utilizing hydrogen atoms from water as well as urea. The aqueous urea solution is essentially non-toxic, easy to handle, and has a sufficient hydrogen content of 8 wt %. This catalytic system can be a promising alternative to the existing hydrogen production systems based on chemical H2 carriers such as ammonia, hydrazine, and organic hydrides. A mechanistic study suggested that the reaction proceeds mainly via two steps: urea hydrolysis followed by NH3 decomposition. More details can be found in the Communication by Furukawa et al. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500112).

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid–Ru/C Catalysts (ChemSusChem 12/2015) (page 1990)

      Dr. Paraskevi Panagiotopoulou, Nickolas Martin and Prof. Dionisios G. Vlachos

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500748

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      The Inside Cover picture demonstrates the synergy of supported metal catalysts and Lewis acid homogeneous metal chlorides in driving the hydrogenolysis of biomass derivatives into valuable fuel additives and chemicals. Strong evidence points towards Lewis acids being mainly responsible for the hydrogenation of furfural to furfural alcohol, whereas the synergy of the Lewis acid/metal catalyst on the molecular level drives the hydrogenolysis of furfural alcohol to 2-methylfuran. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Panagiotopoulou et al. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500212).

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Highly Efficient Oxygen-Storage Material with Intrinsic Coke Resistance for Chemical Looping Combustion-Based CO2 Capture (ChemSusChem 12/2015) (page 2138)

      Qasim Imtiaz, Alexey Kurlov, Prof. Dr. Jennifer Lilia Marguerite Rupp and Prof. Dr. Christoph Rüdiger Müller

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500749

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      The Inside Back Cover picture shows schematically the so-called chemical looping combustion scheme, which is an emerging carbon dioxide capture process. Here, methane reacts with copper oxide, the oxygen carrier, to form carbon dioxide and steam. After condensation of steam, a pure stream of carbon dioxide is obtained ready for compression and sequestration or further utilization. The reduced copper oxide is regenerated to its initial state using air. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Imtiaz et al. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403426).

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Recyclable Bifunctional Polystyrene and Silica Gel-Supported Organocatalyst for the Coupling of CO2 with Epoxides (ChemSusChem 12/2015) (page 2139)

      Dr. Christina Kohrt and Dr. Thomas Werner

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500644

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      The Back Cover picture shows a bifunctional ammonium salt covalently bound to a silica support catalyzing the addition of carbon dioxide to epoxides under solvent-free conditions. The catalysts can be easily recovered by simple filtration after the reaction and reused in up to 13 consecutive runs with retention of high activity and selectivity even at 90 °C. The scope and limitations of the reaction have been evaluated in terms of reaction conditions and substrate scope. More details can be found in the Communication by Kohrt and Werner (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500128).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Hydrogen Production from Aqueous Solutions of Urea with Ruthenium-based Catalysts (page 1991)

      Dr. Shinya Furukawa, Ryohei Suzuki, Kazuyoshi Ochi, Prof. Tatsuaki Yashima and Prof. Takayuki Komatsu

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500620

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “We value the fundamental aspect of observed results…‥” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the Cover image is presented in the Cover Profile. More details can be found in the Communication by Furukawa et al.: 10.1002/cssc.201500112. View the Front Cover here: 10.1002/cssc.201500618.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 12/2015 (pages 1992–1997)

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201590022

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 12/2015 (pages 1998–1999)

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201590023

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Carbon Nanosheets: Synthesis and Application (pages 2004–2027)

      Dr. Huailin Fan and Prof. Wenzhong Shen

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500141

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      Loose leaf: Carbon nanosheets with various thicknesses, morphologies, and pore structures can be synthesized by exfoliation, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), pyrolysis, self-assembly, or solvothermal methods combined with carbonization. The development and applications of these carbon nanosheets are reviewed.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Hydrogen Production from Aqueous Solutions of Urea with Ruthenium-based Catalysts (pages 2028–2030)

      Dr. Shinya Furukawa, Ryohei Suzuki, Kazuyoshi Ochi, Prof. Tatsuaki Yashima and Prof. Takayuki Komatsu

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New to the urea: An efficient catalytic system for hydrogen production from aqueous solution of urea was developed using ruthenium-based catalysts as an alternative for the existing system based on several H2 carriers. Ru/Al2O3 gave the highest catalytic performance, 92 mol % of H2 yield at 500 °C. A mechanistic study revealed that the reaction proceeds mainly via two steps; urea hydrolysis (H2NCONH2+H2O[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]2 NH3+CO2) and the following NH3 decomposition (2 NH3[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]3 H2+N2).

    2. Recyclable Bifunctional Polystyrene and Silica Gel-Supported Organocatalyst for the Coupling of CO2 with Epoxides (pages 2031–2034)

      Dr. Christina Kohrt and Dr. Thomas Werner

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500128

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Do it again: Polystyrene and silica-supported bifunctional ammonium salts catalyze the addition of carbon dioxide to epoxide under mild and solvent-free reaction conditions. Those catalysts can be recycled up to 13 times without loss of activity. Moreover, a wide array of cyclic carbonates can be prepared in excellent yields utilizing those immobilized metal-free catalyst.

    3. A Single-Use Paper-Shaped Microbial Fuel Cell for Rapid Aqueous Biosensing (pages 2035–2040)

      Kuichang Zuo, Han Liu, Qiaoying Zhang, Prof. Peng Liang, Prof. Xia Huang and Prof. Chad D. Vecitis

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500258

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      Sensing the difference: A paper-shaped microbial fuel cell has low internal resistance, inoculation by filtration results in instantaneous power generation, and the integrated current is linearly correlated to microorganism concentration. Thus, there is potential for single-use rapid biosensing.

    4. Rapid Screening of Immobilized Amine CO2 Sorbents for Steam Stability by Their Direct Contact with Liquid H2O (pages 2041–2045)

      Walter Christopher Wilfong, Brian W. Kail and McMahan L. Gray

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500189

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      Steam Fortress: An accelerated liquid H2O technique rapidly determines the stability of hydrophobic and hydrophilic immobilized amine CO2 sorbents towards steam. The 40 min method can predict the steam stability of sorbents during 30 h of conventional testing by thermogravimetric analysis. TMPED proves to stabilize the sorbents towards H2O.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid–Ru/C Catalysts (pages 2046–2054)

      Dr. Paraskevi Panagiotopoulou, Nickolas Martin and Prof. Dionisios G. Vlachos

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500212

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two catalysts are better than one: The catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural in the liquid phase is studied over homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and with mixtures of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts (see scheme).The Lewis acid mainly catalyzes the hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol (FA) and the etherification of furfuryl alcohol with 2-propanol; the Lewis acid/metal catalyst synergy drives the hydrogenolysis of FA to 2-methylfuran (MF).

    2. Highly Efficient Oxygen-Storage Material with Intrinsic Coke Resistance for Chemical Looping Combustion-Based CO2 Capture (pages 2055–2065)

      Qasim Imtiaz, Alexey Kurlov, Prof. Dr. Jennifer Lilia Marguerite Rupp and Prof. Dr. Christoph Rüdiger Müller

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403426

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Head in the CLOU: We report on the development of highly efficient and coke-resistant materials based on ceria-stabilized copper oxide as CO2-capture architectures based on chemical looping combustion.

    3. C[BOND]N and N[BOND]H Bond Metathesis Reactions Mediated by Carbon Dioxide (pages 2066–2072)

      Yehong Wang, Jian Zhang, Jing Liu, Chaofeng Zhang, Zhixin Zhang, Prof. Dr. Jie Xu, Dr. Shutao Xu, Dr. Fangjun Wang and Prof. Dr. Feng Wang

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500318

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      CO2-mediated reactions: CO2-mediated metathesis reactions between amines and DMF to synthesize formamides are described. The N-formylation of amines to formamides is achieved by activating amines, not DMF, via a C[BOND]N and N[BOND]H bond metathesis reaction. Using this method, primary, secondary, aromatic, and heterocyclic amines as well as diamines can be obtained with good to excellent formamide yields.

    4. Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol over Ceria–Zirconia Catalysts (pages 2073–2083)

      Sarah M. Schimming, Onaje D. LaMont, Michael König, Allyson K. Rogers, Andrew D. D'Amico, Matthew M. Yung and Prof. Carsten Sievers

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500317

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      Guaiacol to action: Ceria–zirconia catalysts catalyze the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol in the absence of reduced metal particles. The functional groups are removed, but the aromatic ring is not hydrogenated. Oxygen vacancies are the active sites for hydrodeoxygenation.

    5. Recycled Poly(vinyl alcohol) Sponge for Carbon Encapsulation of Size-Tunable Tin Dioxide Nanocrystalline Composites (pages 2084–2092)

      Dr. Yue Ma, Dr. Cheuk-Wai Tai, Dr. Torbjörn Gustafsson and Prof. Kristina Edström

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500297

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      Easy as PVA: An industrial product, polyvinyl alcohol sponge, is recycled as the carbon matrix for the encapsulation of SnO2 nanocrystals (NCs). The intimate coupling of a macroporous carbon network and SnO2 NCs with an optimal size range results in mixed-conducting properties and a robust structure; thus, impressive Li+ ion storage capabilities are shown. Additional analysis demonstrates the capacity contribution from the non-diffusion-controlled pseudocapacitance.

    6. Zeolitic Core@Shell Adsorbents for the Selective Removal of Free Glycerol from Crude Biodiesel (pages 2093–2105)

      Nima Masoumifard, Dr. Pablo M. Arnal, Prof. Serge Kaliaguine and Prof. Freddy Kleitz

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500190

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      This is a sticky situation…: A new adsorbent for the selective removal of free glycerol from crude biodiesel mixtures is introduced. It consists of a mesoporous silica core with a uniform microporous silicalite-1 shell. Glycerol sorption reveals that effective adsorbents possess highly size-selective pore entrances so as to maintain a larger number of adsorption sites for small molecules (e.g., glycerol, methanol). FAMEs=fatty acid methyl esters

    7. Copper- and Vanadium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin using Dioxygen (pages 2106–2113)

      Jakob Mottweiler, Marta Puche, Dr. Christoph Räuber, Dr. Thomas Schmidt, Dr. Patricia Concepción, Prof. Dr. Avelino Corma and Prof. Dr. Carsten Bolm

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500131

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      Chopping wood: With molecular oxygen as an oxidant, inexpensive transition-metal-containing hydrotalcites (HTc) and combinations of V(acac)3 (acac=acetylacetonate) and Cu(NO3)2⋅3 H2O catalyze the oxidative depolymerization of lignin to dimeric and trimeric products. Both high activity and good selectivity have been achieved in the degradation of a model compound and four different lignin sources.

    8. 3 D Hierarchical Porous Carbon for Supercapacitors Prepared from Lignin through a Facile Template-Free Method (pages 2114–2122)

      Wenli Zhang, Prof. Dr. Haibo Lin, Zheqi Lin, Jian Yin, Prof. Dr. Haiyan Lu, Dechen Liu and Mingzhu Zhao

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403486

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      Solid as a rock: 3D hierarchical porous carbon (HPC) with superior rate performance is prepared from alkaline lignin through a facile, template-free method. In this method, KOH acts both as template and activating agent. The obtained HPC is composed of 3D macroporous cores, mesochannels, and micropores, which endows the obtained HPC with high rate capability and a long lifespan when used in supercapacitors.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tuning of ZIF-Derived Carbon with High Activity, Nitrogen Functionality, and Yield – A Case for Superior CO2 Capture (pages 2123–2132)

      Dr. Srinivas Gadipelli and Prof. Zheng Xiao Guo

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403402

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      Carbon control: A detailed structural analysis is performed for MOF-derived nanoporous carbons, using ZIF-8 as a case study as one of the most commonly used precursors. The controlled carbonization of ZIF-8 yields very different porous carbons with variation of the activated C and N sites. The sample prepared at around 700 °C shows a high content of highly active N functional groups. The samples have enhanced CO2 uptake, binding, and selectivity due to the N and Zn sites.

    10. Biphasic Palladium-Catalyzed Hydroesterification in a Polyol Phase: Selective Synthesis of Derived Monoesters (pages 2133–2137)

      Dr. Romain Pruvost, Dr. Jérôme Boulanger, Dr. Bastien Léger, Prof. Anne Ponchel, Prof. Eric Monflier, Dr. Mathias Ibert, Prof. André Mortreux and Prof. Mathieu Sauthier

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403397

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      Phased out: The palladium-catalyzed hydroesterification reaction with ionic phosphines in a polyol phase allows high selectivity for monoesters and efficient metal separation from the products. The palladium-based catalyst remains immobilized in the polyol phase as a result of cationic triarylphosphines possessing pendent protonated amino groups in the acidic reaction medium or to the presence of a sulfonated phosphine.

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